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Most-download articles are from the articles published in 2021 during the last three month.

Review Articles
Pallidus Stimulation for Chorea-Acanthocytosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Individual Data
Weibin He, Chenhui Li, Hongjuan Dong, Lingmin Shao, Bo Yin, Dianyou Li, Liguo Ye, Ping Hu, Chencheng Zhang, Wei Yi
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(3):197-205.   Published online July 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22003
  • 1,804 View
  • 250 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
A significant proportion of patients with chorea-acanthocytosis (ChAc) fail to respond to standard therapies. Recent evidence suggests that globus pallidus internus (GPi) deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising treatment option; however, reports are few and limited by sample sizes. We conducted a systematic literature review to evaluate the clinical outcome of GPi-DBS for ChAc. PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases were searched for relevant articles published before August 2021. The improvement of multiple motor and nonmotor symptoms was qualitatively presented. Improvements in the Unified Huntington’s Disease Rating Scale motor score (UHDRS-MS) were also analyzed during different follow-up periods. A multivariate linear regression analysis was conducted to identify potential predictors of clinical outcomes. Twenty articles, including 27 patients, were eligible. Ninety-six percent of patients with oromandibular dystonia reported significant improvement. GPi-DBS significantly improved the UHDRS-motor score at < 6 months (p < 0.001) and ≥ 6 months (p < 0.001). The UHDRS-motor score improvement rate was over 25% in 75% (15/20 cases) of patients at long-term follow-up (≥ 6 months). The multiple linear regression analysis showed that sex, age at onset, course of disease, and preoperative movement score had no linear relationship with motor improvement at long-term follow-up (p > 0.05). GPi-DBS is an effective and safe treatment in most patients with ChAc, but no reliable predictor of efficacy has been found. Oromandibular dystonia-dominant patients might be the best candidates for GPi-DBS.
Treatable Ataxias: How to Find the Needle in the Haystack?
Albert Stezin, Pramod Kumar Pal
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(3):206-226.   Published online September 7, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22069
  • 2,110 View
  • 299 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Treatable ataxias are a group of ataxic disorders with specific treatments. These disorders include genetic and metabolic disorders, immune-mediated ataxic disorders, and ataxic disorders associated with infectious and parainfectious etiology, vascular causes, toxins and chemicals, and endocrinopathies. This review provides a comprehensive overview of different treatable ataxias. The major metabolic and genetic treatable ataxic disorders include ataxia with vitamin E deficiency, abetalipoproteinemia, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis, Niemann-Pick disease type C, autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia due to coenzyme Q10 deficiency, glucose transporter type 1 deficiency, and episodic ataxia type 2. The treatment of these disorders includes the replacement of deficient cofactors and vitamins, dietary modifications, and other specific treatments. Treatable ataxias with immune-mediated etiologies include gluten ataxia, anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody-associated ataxia, steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis, Miller-Fisher syndrome, multiple sclerosis, and paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Although dietary modification with a gluten-free diet is adequate in gluten ataxia, other autoimmune ataxias are managed by short-course steroids, plasma exchange, or immunomodulation. For autoimmune ataxias secondary to malignancy, treatment of tumor can reduce ataxic symptoms. Chronic alcohol consumption, antiepileptics, anticancer drugs, exposure to insecticides, heavy metals, and recreational drugs are potentially avoidable and treatable causes of ataxia. Infective and parainfectious causes of cerebellar ataxias include acute cerebellitis, postinfectious ataxia, Whipple’s disease, meningoencephalitis, and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. These disorders are treated with steroids and antibiotics. Recognizing treatable disorders is of paramount importance when dealing with ataxias given that early treatment can prevent permanent neurological sequelae.
Original Articles
Long-Term Outcomes of Deep Brain Stimulation in Pantothenate Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration-Related Dystonia
Kyung Ah Woo, Han-Joon Kim, Seung-Ho Jeon, Hye Ran Park, Kye Won Park, Seung Hyun Lee, Sun Ju Chung, Jong-Hee Chae, Sun Ha Paek, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(3):241-248.   Published online July 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22002
  • 1,014 View
  • 95 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
To investigate the long-term clinical outcomes of pallidal deep brain stimulation (GPi-DBS) in patients with pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN).
Methods
We reviewed the records of patients with genetically confirmed PKAN who received bilateral GPi-DBS for refractory dystonia and were clinically followed up for at least 2 years postoperatively at two centers in Korea. Pre- and postoperative Burke– Fahn–Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale motor subscale (BFMDRS-M) scores, disability subscale (BFMDRS-D) scores, and qualitative clinical information were prospectively collected. Descriptive analysis was performed for BFMDRS-M scores, BFMDRSD scores, and the orofacial, axial, and limb subscores of the BFMDRS-M at 6–12, 24–36, and 60–72 months postoperatively.
Results
Five classic-type, four atypical-type, and one unknown-type PKAN cases were identified. The mean preoperative BFMDRS-M score was 92.1 for the classic type and 38.5 for the atypical or unknown type, with a mean BFMDRS follow-up of 50.7 months and a clinical follow-up of 69.0 months. The mean improvements in BFMDRS-M score were 11.3%, 41.3%, and 30.5% at 6–12, 24–36, and 60–72 months, respectively. In four patients with full regular evaluations until 60–72 months, improvements in the orofacial, axial, and limb subscores persisted, but the disability scores worsened from 24–36 months post-operation compared to the baseline, mainly owing to the aggravation of eating and feeding disabilities.
Conclusion
The benefits of GPi-DBS on dystonia may persist for more than 5 years in PKAN. The effects on patients’ subjective disability may have a shorter duration despite improvements in dystonia owing to the complex manifestations of PKAN.
Potential Link Between Cognition and Motor Reserve in Patients With Parkinson’s Disease
Seok Jong Chung, Yae Ji Kim, Yun Joong Kim, Hye Sun Lee, Mijin Yun, Phil Hyu Lee, Yong Jeong, Young H. Sohn
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(3):249-257.   Published online September 7, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22063
  • 868 View
  • 86 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
To investigate whether there is a link between cognitive function and motor reserve (i.e., individual capacity to cope with nigrostriatal dopamine depletion) in patients with newly diagnosed Parkinson’s disease (PD).
Methods
A total of 163 patients with drug-naïve PD who underwent 18F-FP-CIT PET, brain MRI, and a detailed neuropsychological test were enrolled. We estimated individual motor reserve based on initial motor deficits and striatal dopamine depletion using a residual model. We performed correlation analyses between motor reserve estimates and cognitive composite scores. Diffusion connectometry analysis was performed to map the white matter fiber tracts, of which fractional anisotropy (FA) values were well correlated with motor reserve estimates. Additionally, Cox regression analysis was used to assess the effect of initial motor reserve on the risk of dementia conversion.
Results
The motor reserve estimate was positively correlated with the composite score of the verbal memory function domain (γ = 0.246) and with the years of education (γ = 0.251). Connectometry analysis showed that FA values in the left fornix were positively correlated with the motor reserve estimate, while no fiber tracts were negatively correlated with the motor reserve estimate. Cox regression analysis demonstrated that higher motor reserve estimates tended to be associated with a lower risk of dementia conversion (hazard ratio, 0.781; 95% confidence interval, 0.576–1.058).
Conclusion
The present study demonstrated that the motor reserve estimate was well correlated with verbal memory function and with white matter integrity in the left fornix, suggesting a possible link between cognition and motor reserve in patients with PD.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Extra-Basal Ganglia Brain Structures Are Related to Motor Reserve in Parkinson’s Disease
    Jinyoung Youn, Ji Hye Won, Mansu Kim, Junmo Kwon, Seung Hwan Moon, Minkyeong Kim, Jong Hyun Ahn, Jun Kyu Mun, Hyunjin Park, Jin Whan Cho
    Journal of Parkinson's Disease.2022; : 1.     CrossRef
Review Articles
Immune-Mediated Cerebellar Ataxias: Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment Based on Immunological and Physiological Mechanisms
Hiroshi Mitoma, Mario Manto, Marios Hadjivassiliou
J Mov Disord. 2021;14(1):10-28.   Published online January 12, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20040
  • 8,073 View
  • 561 Download
  • 18 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Since the first description of immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias (IMCAs) by Charcot in 1868, several milestones have been reached in our understanding of this group of neurological disorders. IMCAs have diverse etiologies, such as gluten ataxia, postinfectious cerebellitis, paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration, opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome, anti-GAD ataxia, and primary autoimmune cerebellar ataxia. The cerebellum, a vulnerable autoimmune target of the nervous system, has remarkable capacities (collectively known as the cerebellar reserve, closely linked to plasticity) to compensate and restore function following various pathological insults. Therefore, good prognosis is expected when immune-mediated therapeutic interventions are delivered during early stages when the cerebellar reserve can be preserved. However, some types of IMCAs show poor responses to immunotherapies, even if such therapies are introduced at an early stage. Thus, further research is needed to enhance our understanding of the autoimmune mechanisms underlying IMCAs, as such research could potentially lead to the development of more effective immunotherapies. We underscore the need to pursue the identification of robust biomarkers.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Gluten Ataxia: an Underdiagnosed Condition
    Marios Hadjivassiliou, R. A. Grϋnewald
    The Cerebellum.2022; 21(4): 620.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Problem Solving: Decreased Level of Consciousness and Unexplained Hydrocephalus
    Naomi Niznick, Ronda Lun, Daniel A. Lelli, Tadeu A. Fantaneanu
    The Neurohospitalist.2022; 12(2): 312.     CrossRef
  • Pharmacotherapy of cerebellar and vestibular disorders
    João Lemos, Mario Manto
    Current Opinion in Neurology.2022; 35(1): 118.     CrossRef
  • Advances in the Pathogenesis of Auto-antibody-Induced Cerebellar Synaptopathies
    Hiroshi Mitoma, Mario Manto
    The Cerebellum.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Breakdown of Immune Tolerance in the Cerebellum
    Christiane S. Hampe, Hiroshi Mitoma
    Brain Sciences.2022; 12(3): 328.     CrossRef
  • Acute Cerebellar Inflammation and Related Ataxia: Mechanisms and Pathophysiology
    Md. Sorwer Alam Parvez, Gen Ohtsuki
    Brain Sciences.2022; 12(3): 367.     CrossRef
  • A Case Report of Anti-PCA-2-Positive Autoimmune Cerebellitis
    霞 董
    Advances in Clinical Medicine.2022; 12(04): 3272.     CrossRef
  • Cell-Autonomous Processes That Impair Xenograft Survival into the Cerebellum
    Lorenzo Magrassi, Giulia Nato, Domenico Delia, Annalisa Buffo
    The Cerebellum.2022; 21(5): 821.     CrossRef
  • Diagnosis and Clinical Features in Autoimmune-Mediated Movement Disorders
    Pei-Chen Hsieh, Yih-Ru Wu
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2022; 15(2): 95.     CrossRef
  • Autoimmune cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-leucine-rich glioma-inactivated protein 1 antibodies: Two pediatric cases
    Zhang Weihua, Ren Haitao, Deng Jie, Ren Changhong, Zhou Ji, Zhou Anna, Guan Hongzhi, Ren Xiaotun
    Journal of Neuroimmunology.2022; 370: 577918.     CrossRef
  • Anti-dipeptidyl-peptidase-like protein 6 encephalitis with pure cerebellar ataxia: a case report
    Jing Lin, Min Zhu, Xiaocheng Mao, Zeqing Jin, Meihong Zhou, Daojun Hong
    BMC Neurology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Central Positional Nystagmus
    Ana Inês Martins, André Jorge, João Lemos
    Current Treatment Options in Neurology.2022; 24(10): 453.     CrossRef
  • Paraneoplastic Ataxia: Antibodies at the Forefront Have Become Routine Biomarkers
    Lazaros C. Triarhou, Mario Manto
    The Cerebellum.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Rare Etiologies in Immune-Mediated Cerebellar Ataxias: Diagnostic Challenges
    Marios Hadjivassiliou, Mario Manto, Hiroshi Mitoma
    Brain Sciences.2022; 12(9): 1165.     CrossRef
  • Paraneoplastic syndromes in neuro-ophthalmology
    SimonJ Hickman
    Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology.2022; 25(8): 101.     CrossRef
  • Immunotherapies for the Effective Treatment of Primary Autoimmune Cerebellar Ataxia: a Case Series
    Jiao Li, Bo Deng, Wenli Song, Keru Li, Jingwen Ai, Xiaoni Liu, Haocheng Zhang, Yi Zhang, Ke Lin, Guofu Shao, Chunfeng Liu, Wenhong Zhang, Xiangjun Chen, Yanlin Zhang
    The Cerebellum.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Stiff-Eye Syndrome—Anti-GAD Ataxia Presenting with Isolated Ophthalmoplegia: A Case Report
    Abel Dantas Belém, Thaís de Maria Frota Vasconcelos, Rafael César dos Anjos de Paula, Francisco Bruno Santana da Costa, Pedro Gustavo Barros Rodrigues, Isabelle de Sousa Pereira, Paulo Roberto de Arruda Tavares, Gabriela Studart Galdino, Daniel Aguiar Dia
    Brain Sciences.2021; 11(7): 932.     CrossRef
  • Update on Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Degeneration
    Philipp Alexander Loehrer, Lara Zieger, Ole J. Simon
    Brain Sciences.2021; 11(11): 1414.     CrossRef
Manganese and Movement Disorders: A Review
Dinkar Kulshreshtha, Jacky Ganguly, Mandar Jog
J Mov Disord. 2021;14(2):93-102.   Published online April 6, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20123
  • 6,367 View
  • 390 Download
  • 9 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Scientific and technological advances achieved with industrial expansion have led to an ever-increasing demand for heavy metals. This demand has, in turn, led to increased contamination of soil, water and air with these metals. Chronic exposure to metals may be detrimental not only to occupational workers but also to the nonoccupational population exposed to these metals. Manganese (Mn), a commonly used heavy metal, is an essential cofactor for many enzymatic processes that drive biological functions. However, it is also a potential source of neurotoxicity, particularly in the field of movement disorders. The typical manifestation of Mn overexposure is parkinsonism, which may be difficult to differentiate from the more common idiopathic Parkinson’s disease. In addition to environmental exposure to Mn, other potential etiologies causing hypermanganesemia include systemic health conditions, total parenteral nutrition and genetic mutations causing Mn dyshomeostasis. In this review, we critically analyze Mn and discuss its sources of exposure, pathophysiology and clinical manifestations. We have highlighted the global public health impact of Mn and emphasize that movement disorder specialists should record a detailed social and occupational history to ensure that a toxic etiology is not misdiagnosed as a neurodegenerative disease. In the absence of a definite therapeutic option, early diagnosis and timely institution of preventive measures are the keys to managing its toxic effects.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Differentiating Wild and Apiary Honey by Elemental Profiling: a Case Study from Mangroves of Indian Sundarban
    Tanushree Gaine, Praveen Tudu, Somdeep Ghosh, Shouvik Mahanty, Madhurima Bakshi, Nabanita Naskar, Souparna Chakrabarty, Subarna Bhattacharya, Swati Gupta Bhattacharya, Kashinath Bhattacharya, Punarbasu Chaudhuri
    Biological Trace Element Research.2022; 200(10): 4550.     CrossRef
  • Environmental Impact on the Epigenetic Mechanisms Underlying Parkinson’s Disease Pathogenesis: A Narrative Review
    Efthalia Angelopoulou, Yam Nath Paudel, Sokratis G. Papageorgiou, Christina Piperi
    Brain Sciences.2022; 12(2): 175.     CrossRef
  • Ayahuasca as a Decoction Applied to Human: Analytical Methods, Pharmacology and Potential Toxic Effects
    Ľuboš Nižnanský, Žofia Nižnanská, Roman Kuruc, Andrea Szórádová, Ján Šikuta, Anežka Zummerová
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2022; 11(4): 1147.     CrossRef
  • Can therapeutic plasma exchange be life-saving in life-threatening manganese intoxication?
    Emel Uyar, Esra Gurkas, Aysel Unlusoy Aksu, Serhat Emeksiz, Cigdem Seher Kasapkara, Nadide Basak Gulleroglu, Ikbal Ok Bozkaya, Kader Karlı Oguz
    Transfusion and Apheresis Science.2022; 61(4): 103417.     CrossRef
  • Manganese‐induced parkinsonism responsive to intranasal insulin: A case report
    Mehri Salari, Masoud Etemadifar, Leila Dargahi, Neda Valian, Malihe Rezaee
    Clinical Case Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The potential convergence of NLRP3 inflammasome, potassium, and dopamine mechanisms in Parkinson’s disease
    Adrianne F. Pike, Ildikò Szabò, Robert Veerhuis, Luigi Bubacco
    npj Parkinson's Disease.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effect of Chelation Therapy on a Korean Patient With Brain Manganese Deposition Resulting From a Compound Heterozygous Mutation in the SLC39A14 Gene
    Jae-Hyeok Lee, Jin-Hong Shin
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2022; 15(2): 171.     CrossRef
  • Manganese chloride (MnCl2) induced novel model of Parkinson’s disease in adult Zebrafish; Involvement of oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and apoptosis pathway
    Abhishek.P.R. Nadig, Bader Huwaimel, Ahmed Alobaida, El-Sayed Khafagy, Hadil Faris Alotaibi, Afrasim Moin, Amr Selim Abu Lila, Suman, Sahyadri. M, K.L. Krishna
    Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy.2022; 155: 113697.     CrossRef
  • Çalışma Yaşamında Manganez Maruz Kalımının Sağlık Etkileri ve Parkinsonizm
    Zehra GÖK METİN, Abdulsamet SANDAL, Ali Naci YILDIZ
    Karaelmas İş Sağlığı ve Güvenliği Dergisi.2021; 5(2): 147.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Semiautomated Algorithm for the Diagnosis of Multiple System Atrophy With Predominant Parkinsonism
Woong-Woo Lee, Han-Joon Kim, Hong Ji Lee, Han Byul Kim, Kwang Suk Park, Chul-Ho Sohn, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(3):232-240.   Published online July 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21178
  • 1,006 View
  • 75 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Putaminal iron deposition is an important feature that helps differentiate multiple system atrophy with predominant parkinsonism (MSA-p) from Parkinson’s disease (PD). Most previous studies used visual inspection or quantitative methods with manual manipulation to perform this differentiation. We investigated the value of a new semiautomated diagnostic algorithm using 3T-MR susceptibility-weighted imaging for MSA-p.
Methods
This study included 26 MSA-p, 68 PD, and 41 normal control (NC) subjects. The algorithm was developed in 2 steps: 1) determine the image containing the remarkable putaminal margin and 2) calculate the phase-shift values, which reflect the iron concentration. The next step was to identify the best differentiating conditions among several combinations. The highest phaseshift value of each subject was used to assess the most effective diagnostic set.
Results
The raw phase-shift values were present along the lateral margin of the putamen in each group. It demonstrates an anterior- to-posterior gradient that was identified most frequently in MSA-p. The average of anterior 5 phase shift values were used for normalization. The highest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.874, 80.8% sensitivity, and 86.7% specificity) of MSA-p versus PD was obtained under the combination of 3 or 4 vertical pixels and one dominant side when the normalization methods were applied. In the subanalysis for the MSA-p patients with a longer disease duration, the performance of the algorithm improved.
Conclusion
This algorithm detected the putaminal lateral margin well, provided insight into the iron distribution of the putaminal rim of MSA-p, and demonstrated good performance in differentiating MSA-p from PD.
Increased Mortality in Young-Onset Parkinson’s Disease
Eldbjørg Hustad, Tor Åge Myklebust, Sasha Gulati, Jan O. Aasly
J Mov Disord. 2021;14(3):214-220.   Published online July 29, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21029
  • 14,942 View
  • 235 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Few studies have followed Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients from the time of diagnosis to the date of death. This study compared mortality in the Trondheim PD cohort to the general population, investigated causes of death and analyzed the associations between mortality and age at disease onset (AAO) and cognitive decline defined as Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) score below 26.
Methods
The cohort was followed longitudinally from 1997. By the end of January 2020, 587 patients had died. Comparisons to the Norwegian population were performed by calculating standardized mortality ratios (SMRs). Survival curves were estimated using the standard Kaplan-Meier estimator, and multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were estimated to investigate associations.
Results
SMR was 2.28 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.13–2.44] for the whole cohort. For participants with AAO 20–39 years, the SMR was 5.55 (95% CI: 3.38–8.61). Median survival was 15 years (95% CI: 14.2–15.5) for the whole cohort. Early-onset PD (EOPD) patients (AAO < 50 years) had the longest median survival time. For all groups, there was a significant shortening in median survival time and an almost 3-fold higher age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratio for death when the MoCA score decreased below 26.
Conclusion
PD patients with an AAO before 40 years had a more than fivefold higher mortality rate compared to a similar general population. EOPD patients had the longest median survival; however, their life expectancy was reduced to a greater degree than that of late-onset PD patients. Cognitive impairment was strongly associated with mortality in PD.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Real-World Prescription Patterns For Patients With Young-Onset Parkinson’s Disease in China: A Trend Analysis From 2014 to 2019
    Xiao-qin Liu, Xiao-yu Wang, Hui-ming Shen, Wen-yuan Pang, Ming-kang Zhong, Chun-lai Ma
    Frontiers in Pharmacology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Montreal cognitive assessment (MoCA) is highly correlated with 1-year mortality in hip fracture patients
    R. M. Y. Wong, R. W. K. Ng, W. W. Chau, W. H. Liu, S. K. H. Chow, C. Y. Tso, N. Tang, W.-H. Cheung
    Osteoporosis International.2022; 33(10): 2185.     CrossRef
  • Obituary for Jan O. Aasly (1950–2022)
    Matthew J. Farrer
    Movement Disorders.2022; 37(9): 1783.     CrossRef
  • Age Cutoff for Early‐Onset Parkinson's Disease: Recommendations from the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society Task Force on Early Onset Parkinson's Disease
    Raja Mehanna, Katarzyna Smilowska, Jori Fleisher, Bart Post, Taku Hatano, Maria Elisa Pimentel Piemonte, Kishore Raj Kumar, Victor McConvey, Baorong Zhang, Eng‐King Tan, Rodolfo Savica, Rodolfo Savica, Eng‐King Tan, Raja Mehanna, Katarzyna Smilowska, Conn
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice.2022; 9(7): 869.     CrossRef
Review Articles
Diagnosis and Clinical Features in Autoimmune-Mediated Movement Disorders
Pei-Chen Hsieh, Yih-Ru Wu
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(2):95-105.   Published online May 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21077
  • 2,308 View
  • 383 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Movement disorders are common manifestations in autoimmune-mediated encephalitis. This group of diseases is suspected to be triggered by infection or neoplasm. Certain phenotypes correlate with specific autoantibody-related neurological disorders, such as orofacial-lingual dyskinesia with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis and faciobrachial dystonic seizures with leucine-rich glioma-inactivated protein 1 encephalitis. Early diagnosis and treatment, especially for autoantibodies targeting neuronal surface antigens, can improve prognosis. In contrast, the presence of autoantibodies against intracellular neuronal agents warrants screening for underlying malignancy. However, early clinical diagnosis is challenging because these diseases can be misdiagnosed. In this article, we review the distinctive clinical phenotypes, magnetic resonance imaging findings, and current treatment options for autoimmune-mediated encephalitis.
Gene Therapy for Huntington’s Disease: The Final Strategy for a Cure?
Seulgi Byun, Mijung Lee, Manho Kim
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(1):15-20.   Published online November 17, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21006
  • 3,990 View
  • 363 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Huntington’s disease (HD) has become a target of the first clinical trials for gene therapy among movement disorders with a genetic origin. More than 100 clinical trials regarding HD have been tried, but all failed, although there were some improvements limited to symptomatic support. Compared to other neurogenetic disorders, HD is known to have a single genetic target. Thus, this is an advantage and its cure is more feasible than any other movement disorder with heterogeneous genetic causes. In this review paper, the authors attempt to cover the characteristics of HD itself while providing an overview of the gene transfer methods currently being researched, and will introduce an experimental trial with a preclinical model of HD followed by an update on the ongoing clinical trials for patients with HD.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Mitochondrial organization and structure are compromised in fibroblasts from patients with Huntington’s disease
    Marie Vanisova, Hana Stufkova, Michaela Kohoutova, Tereza Rakosnikova, Jana Krizova, Jiri Klempir, Irena Rysankova, Jan Roth, Jiri Zeman, Hana Hansikova
    Ultrastructural Pathology.2022; 46(5): 462.     CrossRef
  • Pathogenesis of Huntington’s Disease: An Emphasis on Molecular Pathways and Prevention by Natural Remedies
    Zainab Irfan, Sofia Khanam, Varnita Karmakar, Sayeed Mohammed Firdous, Bothaina Samih Ismail Abou El Khier, Ilyas Khan, Muneeb U. Rehman, Andleeb Khan
    Brain Sciences.2022; 12(10): 1389.     CrossRef
  • CRISPR: a tool with potential for genomic reprogramming in neurological disorders
    Yogesh K. Dhuriya, Aijaz A. Naik
    Molecular Biology Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Letter to the editor
Mosapride-Induced Movement Disorders
Sang-Wook Hong, Hae-Won Shin
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(3):273-276.   Published online May 10, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21149
  • 1,593 View
  • 183 Download
PDF
Original Article
Health-Related Quality of Life for Parkinson’s Disease Patients and Their Caregivers
Michal Lubomski, Ryan L. Davis, Carolyn M. Sue
J Mov Disord. 2021;14(1):42-52.   Published online January 12, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20079
  • 6,441 View
  • 215 Download
  • 13 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Motor and non-motor symptoms (NMS) negatively impact the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) for individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD), as well as their caregivers. NMS can emerge decades prior to the manifestation of motor symptoms but often go unrecognized and therefore untreated. To guide clinical management, we surveyed differences and identified factors that influence HRQoL in a cohort of PD patients and family caregivers.
Methods
A total of 103 PD patients were compared with 81 caregivers. Outcome measures collected from validated questionnaires included generic and disease-specific HRQoL assessments, depression frequency and severity, constipation severity, upper and lower gastrointestinal symptoms, physical activity and motor symptom severity.
Results
PD patients reported significantly decreased physical and mental HRQoL compared to their caregivers (both p < 0.001). Unemployment, the need for social support services, rehabilitation use, REM sleep behavior disorder, impulse control disorders and features suggestive of increasing disease severity hallmarked by increasing PD duration, higher MDS UPDRS-III (Movement Disorder Society–Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale–Part III) scores, higher daily levodopa equivalence dose and motor fluctuations were consistent with a lower HRQoL in our PD cohort. Furthermore, decreased physical activity, chronic pain, depression, constipation and upper gastrointestinal dysfunction (particularly indigestion, excess fullness and bloating) suggested vulnerability to reduced HRQoL. Overall, PD patients perceived their health to decline by 12% more than their caregivers did over a 1-year period.
Conclusion
PD patients reported decreased HRQoL, with both motor symptoms and NMS negatively impacting HRQoL. Our findings support the routine clinical screening of HRQoL in PD patients to identify and address modifiable factors.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The impact of device-assisted therapies on the gut microbiome in Parkinson’s disease
    Michal Lubomski, Xiangnan Xu, Andrew J. Holmes, Jean Y. H. Yang, Carolyn M. Sue, Ryan L. Davis
    Journal of Neurology.2022; 269(2): 780.     CrossRef
  • Predictive Model of Quality of Life in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease
    Eduardo Candel-Parra, María Pilar Córcoles-Jiménez, Victoria Delicado-Useros, Marta Carolina Ruiz-Grao, Antonio Hernández-Martínez, Milagros Molina-Alarcón
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(2): 672.     CrossRef
  • Die neue Parkinson-Schmerzklassifikation (PSK)
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Brief communication
Sensitivity of Detecting Alpha-Synuclein Accumulation in the Gastrointestinal Tract and Tissue Volume Examined
Chaewon Shin, Seong-Ik Kim, Sung-Hye Park, Jung Hwan Shin, Chan Young Lee, Han-Kwang Yang, Hyuk-Joon Lee, Seong-Ho Kong, Yun-Suhk Suh, Han-Joon Kim, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(3):264-268.   Published online July 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22042
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
This study aimed to evaluate whether a larger tissue volume increases the sensitivity of detecting alpha-synuclein (AS) pathology in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.
Methods
Nine patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) or idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep disorder (iRBD) who underwent GI operation and had full-depth intestinal blocks were included. All patients were selected from our previous study population. A total of 10 slides (5 serial sections from the proximal and distal blocks) per patient were analyzed.
Results
In previous studies, pathologic evaluation revealed phosphorylated AS (+) in 5/9 patients (55.6%) and in 1/5 controls (20.0%); in this extensive examination, this increased to 8/9 patients (88.9%) but remained the same in controls (20.0%). The severity and distribution of positive findings were similar between patients with iRBD and PD.
Conclusion
Examining a large tissue volume increased the sensitivity of detecting AS accumulation in the GI tract.
Case Report
Nearly Abolished Dopamine Transporter Uptake in a Patient With a Novel FBXO7 Mutation
Eun Young Kim, Seon Young Kim, Youngduk Seo, Chaewon Shin
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(3):269-272.   Published online July 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22006
  • 1,096 View
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  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Mutations in the F-box only protein 7 (FBXO7) gene are the cause of autosomal recessive parkinsonian-pyramidal syndrome. Herein, we report a patient with a novel FBXO7 mutation with a unique clinical presentation. A 43-year-old male visited our hospital with complaints of progressing gait disturbance since a generalized tonic clonic seizure. There were no past neurological symptoms or familial disorders. Neurological examination revealed bradykinesia, masked face, stooped posture, parkinsonian gait, and postural instability. The bilateral uptake by dopamine transporters was nearly abolished, as determined by N-(3-[18F]fluoropropyl)- 2β-carbon ethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl) nortropane positron emission tomography (18F-FP-CIT PET). Next-generation sequencing revealed a heterozygous c.1066_1069delTCTG (p.Ser356ArgfsTer56) frameshift variant and a heterozygous c.80G>A (p.Arg27His) missense variant of the FBXO7 gene. The patient’s specific clinical features, medication-refractory parkinsonism and seizures further broaden the spectrum of FBXO7 mutations. The nearly abolished dopamine transporter uptake identified by 18F-FP-CIT PET is frequently found in patients with FBXO7 mutations, which is different from the usual rostrocaudal gradient that is observed in patients with Parkinson’s disease.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The characteristics of FBXO7 and its role in human diseases
    Yeling Zhong, Jinyun Li, Meng Ye, Xiaofeng Jin
    Gene.2023; 851: 146972.     CrossRef
Review Article
Evidence of Inflammation in Parkinson’s Disease and Its Contribution to Synucleinopathy
Thuy Thi Lai, Yun Joong Kim, Hyeo-il Ma, Young Eun Kim
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(1):1-14.   Published online November 3, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21078
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  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Accumulation of alpha-synuclein (αSyn) protein in neurons is a renowned pathological hallmark of Parkinson’s disease (PD). In addition, accumulating evidence indicates that activated inflammatory responses are involved in the pathogenesis of PD. Thus, achieving a better understanding of the interaction between inflammation and synucleinopathy in relation to the PD process will facilitate the development of promising disease-modifying therapies. In this review, the evidence of inflammation in PD is discussed, and human, animal, and laboratory studies relevant to the relationship between inflammation and αSyn are explored as well as new therapeutic targets associated with this relationship.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
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JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders