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Most-read articles are from the articles published in 2020 during the last three month.

Original Article
Increased Mortality in Young-Onset Parkinson’s Disease
Eldbjørg Hustad, Tor Åge Myklebust, Sasha Gulati, Jan O. Aasly
J Mov Disord. 2021;14(3):214-220.   Published online July 29, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21029
  • 13,314 View
  • 211 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Few studies have followed Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients from the time of diagnosis to the date of death. This study compared mortality in the Trondheim PD cohort to the general population, investigated causes of death and analyzed the associations between mortality and age at disease onset (AAO) and cognitive decline defined as Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) score below 26.
Methods
The cohort was followed longitudinally from 1997. By the end of January 2020, 587 patients had died. Comparisons to the Norwegian population were performed by calculating standardized mortality ratios (SMRs). Survival curves were estimated using the standard Kaplan-Meier estimator, and multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were estimated to investigate associations.
Results
SMR was 2.28 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.13–2.44] for the whole cohort. For participants with AAO 20–39 years, the SMR was 5.55 (95% CI: 3.38–8.61). Median survival was 15 years (95% CI: 14.2–15.5) for the whole cohort. Early-onset PD (EOPD) patients (AAO < 50 years) had the longest median survival time. For all groups, there was a significant shortening in median survival time and an almost 3-fold higher age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratio for death when the MoCA score decreased below 26.
Conclusion
PD patients with an AAO before 40 years had a more than fivefold higher mortality rate compared to a similar general population. EOPD patients had the longest median survival; however, their life expectancy was reduced to a greater degree than that of late-onset PD patients. Cognitive impairment was strongly associated with mortality in PD.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Real-World Prescription Patterns For Patients With Young-Onset Parkinson’s Disease in China: A Trend Analysis From 2014 to 2019
    Xiao-qin Liu, Xiao-yu Wang, Hui-ming Shen, Wen-yuan Pang, Ming-kang Zhong, Chun-lai Ma
    Frontiers in Pharmacology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Montreal cognitive assessment (MoCA) is highly correlated with 1-year mortality in hip fracture patients
    R. M. Y. Wong, R. W. K. Ng, W. W. Chau, W. H. Liu, S. K. H. Chow, C. Y. Tso, N. Tang, W.-H. Cheung
    Osteoporosis International.2022; 33(10): 2185.     CrossRef
  • Obituary for Jan O. Aasly (1950–2022)
    Matthew J. Farrer
    Movement Disorders.2022; 37(9): 1783.     CrossRef
  • Age Cutoff for Early‐Onset Parkinson's Disease: Recommendations from the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society Task Force on Early Onset Parkinson's Disease
    Raja Mehanna, Katarzyna Smilowska, Jori Fleisher, Bart Post, Taku Hatano, Maria Elisa Pimentel Piemonte, Kishore Raj Kumar, Victor McConvey, Baorong Zhang, Eng‐King Tan, Rodolfo Savica, Rodolfo Savica, Eng‐King Tan, Raja Mehanna, Katarzyna Smilowska, Conn
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice.2022; 9(7): 869.     CrossRef
Review Article
Update on Current Technologies for Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson’s Disease
Michelle Paff, Aaron Loh, Can Sarica, Andres M. Lozano, Alfonso Fasano
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(3):185-198.   Published online August 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20052
  • 13,738 View
  • 597 Download
  • 34 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is becoming increasingly central in the treatment of patients with Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders. Recent developments in DBS lead and implantable pulse generator design provide increased flexibility for programming, potentially improving the therapeutic benefit of stimulation. Directional DBS leads may increase the therapeutic window of stimulation by providing a means of avoiding current spread to structures that might give rise to stimulation-related side effects. Similarly, control of current to individual contacts on a DBS lead allows for shaping of the electric field produced between multiple active contacts. The following review aims to describe the recent developments in DBS system technology and the features of each commercially available DBS system. The advantages of each system are reviewed, and general considerations for choosing the most appropriate system are discussed.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Long-term motor outcomes of deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus interna in Parkinson's disease patients: Five-year follow-up
    Yun Su Hwang, Sungyang Jo, Seung Hyun Lee, Nayoung Kim, Mi-Sun Kim, Sang Ryong Jeon, Sun Ju Chung
    Journal of the Neurological Sciences.2023; 444: 120484.     CrossRef
  • Brain stimulation treatments in epilepsy: Basic mechanisms and clinical advances
    Thomas J. Foutz, Michael Wong
    Biomedical Journal.2022; 45(1): 27.     CrossRef
  • Neurodegenerative disorders management: state-of-art and prospects of nano-biotechnology
    Raj Kumar, Keshaw Ram Aadil, Kunal Mondal, Yogendra Kumar Mishra, David Oupicky, Seeram Ramakrishna, Ajeet Kaushik
    Critical Reviews in Biotechnology.2022; 42(8): 1180.     CrossRef
  • Sleep and circadian rhythms in Parkinson’s disease and preclinical models
    Jeremy Hunt, Elizabeth J. Coulson, Rajendram Rajnarayanan, Henrik Oster, Aleksandar Videnovic, Oliver Rawashdeh
    Molecular Neurodegeneration.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Jose Delgado: A controversial trailblazer in neuromodulation
    Nicholas D. Lorusso, Uma R. Mohan, Joshua Jacobs
    Artificial Organs.2022; 46(4): 531.     CrossRef
  • Local and distant cortical responses to single pulse intracranial stimulation in the human brain are differentially modulated by specific stimulation parameters
    Angelique C. Paulk, Rina Zelmann, Britni Crocker, Alik S. Widge, Darin D. Dougherty, Emad N. Eskandar, Daniel S. Weisholtz, R. Mark Richardson, G. Rees Cosgrove, Ziv M. Williams, Sydney S. Cash
    Brain Stimulation.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Proceedings of the Ninth Annual Deep Brain Stimulation Think Tank: Advances in Cutting Edge Technologies, Artificial Intelligence, Neuromodulation, Neuroethics, Pain, Interventional Psychiatry, Epilepsy, and Traumatic Brain Injury
    Joshua K. Wong, Günther Deuschl, Robin Wolke, Hagai Bergman, Muthuraman Muthuraman, Sergiu Groppa, Sameer A. Sheth, Helen M. Bronte-Stewart, Kevin B. Wilkins, Matthew N. Petrucci, Emilia Lambert, Yasmine Kehnemouyi, Philip A. Starr, Simon Little, Juan Ans
    Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Past, Present, and Future of Deep Brain Stimulation: Hardware, Software, Imaging, Physiology and Novel Approaches
    Jessica Frey, Jackson Cagle, Kara A. Johnson, Joshua K. Wong, Justin D. Hilliard, Christopher R. Butson, Michael S. Okun, Coralie de Hemptinne
    Frontiers in Neurology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Parkinson’s Disease Management via Wearable Sensors: A Systematic Review
    Huma Mughal, Abdul Rehman Javed, Muhammad Rizwan, Ahmad S. Almadhor, Natalia Kryvinska
    IEEE Access.2022; 10: 35219.     CrossRef
  • Conversion to Hybrid Deep Brain Stimulation System to Enable Multi‐Contact Fractionation Can be Therapeutic
    Disep I. Ojukwu, Allan R. Wang, Traci S. Hornbeck, Erika A. Lim, Jennifer Sharrard, Rohit Dhall, Vivek P. Buch, Casey H. Halpern
    Movement Disorders.2022; 37(6): 1321.     CrossRef
  • Developments in Deep Brain Stimulators for Successful Aging Towards Smart Devices—An Overview
    Angelito A. Silverio, Lean Angelo A. Silverio
    Frontiers in Aging.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Single-interface bioelectronic medicines—concept, clinical applications and preclinical data
    Cristian Sevcencu
    Journal of Neural Engineering.2022; 19(3): 031001.     CrossRef
  • Current Steering Using Multiple Independent Current Control Deep Brain Stimulation Technology Results in Distinct Neurophysiological Responses in Parkinson’s Disease Patients
    Jana Peeters, Alexandra Boogers, Tine Van Bogaert, Robin Gransier, Jan Wouters, Bart Nuttin, Myles Mc Laughlin
    Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Managing Intractable Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease: A Nonsurgical Approach Employing Infralow Frequency Neuromodulation
    Stella B. Legarda, P. Andreas Michas-Martin, Dana McDermott
    Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Directional Deep Brain Stimulation in the Treatment of Parkinson's Disease
    Akash Mishra, Ritesh A Ramdhani
    Neurology.2022; 18(1): 64.     CrossRef
  • Approach to the Treatment of Pediatric Dystonia
    Carolina Gorodetsky, Alfonso Fasano
    Dystonia.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • CRISPR and iPSCs: Recent Developments and Future Perspectives in Neurodegenerative Disease Modelling, Research, and Therapeutics
    Tirthankar Sen, Rajkumar P. Thummer
    Neurotoxicity Research.2022; 40(5): 1597.     CrossRef
  • Encoding type, medication, and deep brain stimulation differentially affect memory-guided sequential reaching movements in Parkinson's disease
    Fabian J. David, Yessenia M. Rivera, Tara K. Entezar, Rishabh Arora, Quentin H. Drane, Miranda J. Munoz, Joshua M. Rosenow, Sepehr B. Sani, Gian D. Pal, Leonard Verhagen-Metman, Daniel M. Corcos
    Frontiers in Neurology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Remote programming for subthalamic deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease
    Si Chen, Shu-jun Xu, Wei-guo Li, Teng Chen, Chao Li, Shuo Xu, Ning Yang, Yi-ming Liu
    Frontiers in Neurology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Longevity of Deep Brain Stimulation Batteries; a Global Survey of Neurosurgeons and Neurologists
    Marwan Hariz, Gun‐Marie Hariz, Patric Blomstedt
    Movement Disorders.2021; 36(5): 1273.     CrossRef
  • Basic Tips: How Do I Start Programming Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson Disease Patients?
    Carolina Gorodetsky, Alfonso Fasano
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice.2021; 8(4): 639.     CrossRef
  • Deep brain stimulation: Challenges at the tissue‐electrode interface and current solutions
    Emily Kolaya, Bonnie L. Firestein
    Biotechnology Progress.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • An Update on Medical and Surgical Treatments of Parkinson’s Disease
    Dipali Nemade, Thyagarajan Subramanian, Vikram Shivkumar
    Aging and disease.2021; 12(4): 1021.     CrossRef
  • Experimental Characterization of Ferroelectric Capacitor Circuits for the Realization of Simply Designed Electroceuticals
    Yves Olsommer, Frank R. Ihmig
    Electronic Materials.2021; 2(3): 299.     CrossRef
  • Flexible vs. standard subthalamic stimulation in Parkinson disease: A double-blind proof-of-concept cross-over trial
    Derrick Soh, Ricardo Maciel, Musleh Algarni, Karlo Lizarraga, Aaron Loh, Jürgen Germann, Gavin Elias, Alexandre Boutet, Renato P. Munhoz, Suneil K. Kalia, Mojgan Hodaie, Andres M. Lozano, Alfonso Fasano
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2021; 89: 93.     CrossRef
  • Telemedicine and Deep brain stimulation - Current practices and recommendations
    Vibhash D. Sharma, Delaram Safarpour, Shyamal H. Mehta, Nora Vanegas-Arroyave, Daniel Weiss, Jeffrey W. Cooney, Zoltan Mari, Alfonso Fasano
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2021; 89: 199.     CrossRef
  • Subspace-based predictive control of Parkinson’s disease: A model-based study
    Mahboubeh Ahmadipour, Mojtaba Barkhordari-Yazdi, Saeid R. Seydnejad
    Neural Networks.2021; 142: 680.     CrossRef
  • Advances in Triboelectric Nanogenerators for Self‐Powered Regenerative Medicine
    Samira Parandeh, Niloofar Etemadi, Mahshid Kharaziha, Guorui Chen, Ardo Nashalian, Xiao Xiao, Jun Chen
    Advanced Functional Materials.2021; 31(47): 2105169.     CrossRef
  • Implantable Pulse Generators for Deep Brain Stimulation: Challenges, Complications, and Strategies for Practicality and Longevity
    Can Sarica, Christian Iorio-Morin, David H. Aguirre-Padilla, Ahmed Najjar, Michelle Paff, Anton Fomenko, Kazuaki Yamamoto, Ajmal Zemmar, Nir Lipsman, George M. Ibrahim, Clement Hamani, Mojgan Hodaie, Andres M. Lozano, Renato P. Munhoz, Alfonso Fasano, Sun
    Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Microstimulation Is a Promising Approach in Achieving Better Lead Placement in Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery
    Lin Shi, Shiying Fan, Tianshuo Yuan, Huaying Fang, Jie Zheng, Zunyu Xiao, Yu Diao, Guanyu Zhu, Quan Zhang, Huanguang Liu, Hua Zhang, Fangang Meng, Jianguo Zhang, Anchao Yang
    Frontiers in Neurology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Revisiting brain stimulation in Parkinson’s disease
    Carola A. Haas
    Science.2021; 374(6564): 153.     CrossRef
  • A New Implantable Closed-Loop Clinical Neural Interface: First Application in Parkinson’s Disease
    Mattia Arlotti, Matteo Colombo, Andrea Bonfanti, Tomasz Mandat, Michele Maria Lanotte, Elena Pirola, Linda Borellini, Paolo Rampini, Roberto Eleopra, Sara Rinaldo, Luigi Romito, Marcus L. F. Janssen, Alberto Priori, Sara Marceglia
    Frontiers in Neuroscience.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Update on Parkinson's Disease Therapy
    Rebecca M Gilbert
    Neurology.2021; 17(2): 92.     CrossRef
  • Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease: Currents Status and Emerging Concepts
    PareshK Doshi, Deepak Das
    Neurology India.2020; 68(8): 179.     CrossRef
Case Report
New Nonsense Variant c.2983G>T; p.Glu995* in the CACNA1A Gene Causes Progressive Autosomal Dominant Ataxia
Yannic Saathoff, Saskia Biskup, Claudia Funke, Christian Roth
J Mov Disord. 2021;14(1):70-74.   Published online October 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20082
  • 4,596 View
  • 90 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
The genetic testing of hereditary ataxias includes screening for CAG-repeat expansions as well as pathogenic variants and nontranslated oligonucleotide expansion, which can cause spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). Genotype-phenotype correlations of several SCA subtypes are difficult to establish, and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we report a 58-year-old male patient who presented with severe generalized ataxia, horizontal gaze-evoked nystagmus, cognitive impairment and a positive family history of gait difficulties. Genetic panel diagnostics revealed a new nonsense pathogenic variant in the CACNA1A gene (c.2983G>T; p. Glu995*) that segregated with the phenotype in three clinically affected family members. This gene is related to SCA type 6 (SCA6), episodic ataxia type 2, familial hemiplegic migraine type 1, among others. When it is supported by the clinical findings and family history, additional DNA sequencing beyond fragment length analysis should be performed.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Next-Generation Sequencing Technologies and Neurogenetic Diseases
    Hui Sun, Xiao-Rong Shen, Zi-Bing Fang, Zong-Zhi Jiang, Xiao-Jing Wei, Zi-Yi Wang, Xue-Fan Yu
    Life.2021; 11(4): 361.     CrossRef
Review Article
Pallidus Stimulation for Chorea-Acanthocytosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Individual Data
Weibin He, Chenhui Li, Hongjuan Dong, Lingmin Shao, Bo Yin, Dianyou Li, Liguo Ye, Ping Hu, Chencheng Zhang, Wei Yi
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(3):197-205.   Published online July 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22003
  • 1,383 View
  • 167 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
A significant proportion of patients with chorea-acanthocytosis (ChAc) fail to respond to standard therapies. Recent evidence suggests that globus pallidus internus (GPi) deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising treatment option; however, reports are few and limited by sample sizes. We conducted a systematic literature review to evaluate the clinical outcome of GPi-DBS for ChAc. PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases were searched for relevant articles published before August 2021. The improvement of multiple motor and nonmotor symptoms was qualitatively presented. Improvements in the Unified Huntington’s Disease Rating Scale motor score (UHDRS-MS) were also analyzed during different follow-up periods. A multivariate linear regression analysis was conducted to identify potential predictors of clinical outcomes. Twenty articles, including 27 patients, were eligible. Ninety-six percent of patients with oromandibular dystonia reported significant improvement. GPi-DBS significantly improved the UHDRS-motor score at < 6 months (p < 0.001) and ≥ 6 months (p < 0.001). The UHDRS-motor score improvement rate was over 25% in 75% (15/20 cases) of patients at long-term follow-up (≥ 6 months). The multiple linear regression analysis showed that sex, age at onset, course of disease, and preoperative movement score had no linear relationship with motor improvement at long-term follow-up (p > 0.05). GPi-DBS is an effective and safe treatment in most patients with ChAc, but no reliable predictor of efficacy has been found. Oromandibular dystonia-dominant patients might be the best candidates for GPi-DBS.
Original Article
Comparison of Spontaneous Motor Tempo during Finger Tapping, Toe Tapping and Stepping on the Spot in People with and without Parkinson’s Disease
Dawn Rose, Daniel J. Cameron, Peter J. Lovatt, Jessica A. Grahn, Lucy E. Annett
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(1):47-56.   Published online January 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.19043
  • 12,264 View
  • 144 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Spontaneous motor tempo (SMT), observed in walking, tapping and clapping, tends to occur around 2 Hz. Initiating and controlling movement can be difficult for people with Parkinson’s (PWP), but studies have not identified whether PWP differ from controls in SMT. For community-based interventions, e.g. dancing, it would be helpful to know a baseline SMT to optimize the tempi of cued activities. Therefore, this study compared finger tapping (FT), toe tapping (TT) and stepping ‘on the spot’ (SS) in PWP and two groups of healthy controls [age-matched controls (AMC) and young healthy controls (YHC)], as SMT is known to change with age.
Methods
Participants (PWP; n = 30, AMC; n = 23, YHC; n = 35) were asked to tap or step on the spot at a natural pace for two trials lasting 40 seconds. The central 30 seconds were averaged for analyses using mean inter-onset intervals (IOI) and coefficient of variation (CoV) to measure rate and variability respectively.
Results
PWP had faster SMT than both control groups, depending on the movement modality: FT, F(2, 87) = 7.92, p < 0.01 (PWP faster than YHC); TT, F(2, 87) = 4.89, p = 0.01 (PWP faster than AMC); and SS, F(2, 77) = 3.26, p = 0.04 (PWP faster than AMC). PWP had higher CoV (more variable tapping) than AMC in FT only, F(2, 87) = 4.10, p = 0.02.
Conclusion
This study provides the first direct comparison of SMT between PWP and two control groups for different types of movements. Results suggest SMT is generally faster in PWP than control groups, and more variable when measured with finger tapping compared to stepping on the spot.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Deficient Interhemispheric Connectivity Underlies Movement Irregularities in Parkinson’s Disease
    Manuel Bange, Gabriel Gonzalez-Escamilla, Tabea Marquardt, Angela Radetz, Christian Dresel, Damian Herz, Wolfgang Immanuel Schöllhorn, Sergiu Groppa, Muthuraman Muthuraman
    Journal of Parkinson's Disease.2022; 12(1): 381.     CrossRef
  • Memory-Paced Tapping to Auditory Rhythms: Effects of Rate, Speech, and Motor Engagement
    Anat Kliger Amrani, Elana Zion Golumbic
    Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research.2022; 65(3): 923.     CrossRef
  • Virtual Reality to Evaluate the Impact of Colorful Interventions and Nature Elements on Spontaneous Walking, Gaze, and Emotion
    Adamantia Batistatou, Florentin Vandeville, Yvonne N. Delevoye-Turrell
    Frontiers in Virtual Reality.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Synchronization during Improvised Active Music Therapy in clients with Parkinson’s disease
    Demian Kogutek, Emily Ready, Jeffrey D. Holmes, Jessica A. Grahn
    Nordic Journal of Music Therapy.2022; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Neural synchronization is strongest to the spectral flux of slow music and depends on familiarity and beat salience
    Kristin Weineck, Olivia Xin Wen, Molly J Henry
    eLife.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Spontaneous motor tempo contributes to preferred music tempo regardless of music familiarity
    Kyoko Hine, Koki Abe, Yuya Kinzuka, Mohammad Shehata, Katsunobu Hatano, Toshie Matsui, Shigeki Nakauchi
    Frontiers in Psychology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A general procedure to measure the pacing of body movements timed to music and metronome in younger and older adults
    Dawn Rose, Laurent Ott, Ségolène M. R. Guérin, Lucy E. Annett, Peter Lovatt, Yvonne N. Delevoye-Turrell
    Scientific Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Synchronization and locking in oscillators with flexible periods
    Mariya Savinov, David Swigon, Bard Ermentrout
    Chaos: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Nonlinear Science.2021; 31(3): 033143.     CrossRef
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    Rie Asano, Cedric Boeckx, Uwe Seifert
    Cognition.2021; 216: 104847.     CrossRef
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    Anat Kliger Amrani, Elana Zion Golumbic
    Neuropsychologia.2020; 146: 107544.     CrossRef
Review Articles
Diagnostic Criteria for Dementia with Lewy Bodies: Updates and Future Directions
Masahito Yamada, Junji Komatsu, Keiko Nakamura, Kenji Sakai, Miharu Samuraki-Yokohama, Kenichi Nakajima, Mitsuhiro Yoshita
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(1):1-10.   Published online November 8, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.19052
  • 21,044 View
  • 1,498 Download
  • 15 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
The aim of this article is to describe the 2017 revised consensus criteria for the clinical diagnosis of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) with future directions for the diagnostic criteria. The criteria for the clinical diagnosis of probable and possible DLB were first published as the first consensus report in 1996 and were revised in the third consensus report in 2005. After discussion at the International DLB Conference in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA, in 2015, the International DLB Consortium published the fourth consensus report including the revised consensus criteria in 2017. The 2017 revised criteria clearly distinguish between clinical features and diagnostic biomarkers. Significant new information about previously reported aspects of DLB has been incorporated, with increased diagnostic weighting given to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial scintigraphy. Future directions include the development of the criteria for early diagnosis (prodromal DLB) and the establishment of new biomarkers that directly indicate Lewy-related pathology, including α-synuclein imaging, biopsies of peripheral tissues (skin, etc.) for the demonstration of α-synuclein deposition, and biochemical markers (cerebrospinal fluid/blood), as well as the pathological evaluation of the sensitivity and specificity of the 2017 revised diagnostic criteria. In conclusion, the revised consensus criteria for the clinical diagnosis of DLB were reported with the incorporation of new information about DLB in 2017. Future directions include the development of the criteria for early diagnosis and the establishment of biomarkers directly indicative of Lewy-related pathology.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Autonomic symptoms are predictive of dementia with Lewy bodies
    Wenzheng Hu, Shuai Liu, Fei Wang, Han Zhu, Xiaoshan Du, Lingyun Ma, Jinghuan Gan, Hao Wu, Xiaodan Wang, Yong Ji
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2022; 95: 1.     CrossRef
  • Delusion and Delirium in Neurodegenerative Disorders: An Overlooked Relationship?
    Daniele Urso, Valentina Gnoni, Marco Filardi, Giancarlo Logroscino
    Frontiers in Psychiatry.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Yian Gu, Anton Kociolek, Kayri K. Fernandez, Stephanie A. Cosentino, Carolyn Wei Zhu, Zhezhen Jin, James B. Leverenz, Yaakov B. Stern
    Neurology.2022; 98(21): e2140.     CrossRef
  • Diagnostic Performance for Differential Diagnosis of Atypical Parkinsonian Syndromes from Parkinson’s Disease Using Quantitative Indices of 18F-FP-CIT PET/CT
    Miju Cheon, Seung Min Kim, Sang-Won Ha, Min Ju Kang, Hea-Eun Yang, Jang Yoo
    Diagnostics.2022; 12(6): 1402.     CrossRef
  • The promise of amplification assays for accurate early detection of α-synucleinopathies: A review
    Regina Kurapova, Leonidas Chouliaras, John T. O'Brien
    Experimental Gerontology.2022; 165: 111842.     CrossRef
  • Progressive Olfactory Impairment and Cardiac Sympathetic Denervation in REM Sleep Behavior Disorder
    Annette Janzen, David Vadasz, Jan Booij, Markus Luster, Damiano Librizzi, Martin T. Henrich, Lars Timmermann, Mahboubeh Habibi, Elisabeth Sittig, Geert Mayer, Fanni Geibl, Wolfgang Oertel
    Journal of Parkinson's Disease.2022; 12(6): 1921.     CrossRef
  • A Systematic Review and Comparison of Neurocognitive Features of Late-Life Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Dementia With Lewy Bodies
    Jennifer L. Prentice, Morgan J. Schaeffer, Alexandra K. Wall, Brandy L. Callahan
    Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology.2021; 34(5): 466.     CrossRef
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    Kurt Segers, Florence Benoit, Jean-Marie Meyts, Gérald Glibert, Sophie Levy, Murielle Surquin
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  • Impaired meningeal lymphatic drainage in patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease
    Xue-Bing Ding, Xin-Xin Wang, Dan-Hao Xia, Han Liu, Hai-Yan Tian, Yu Fu, Yong-Kang Chen, Chi Qin, Jiu-Qi Wang, Zhi Xiang, Zhong-Xian Zhang, Qin-Chen Cao, Wei Wang, Jia-Yi Li, Erxi Wu, Bei-Sha Tang, Ming-Ming Ma, Jun-Fang Teng, Xue-Jing Wang
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  • Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration in Various Forms of Parkinsonism—Similarities and Differences
    Dariusz Koziorowski, Monika Figura, Łukasz M. Milanowski, Stanisław Szlufik, Piotr Alster, Natalia Madetko, Andrzej Friedman
    Cells.2021; 10(3): 656.     CrossRef
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    Raymond Wong, Yishan Luo, Vincent Chung-tong Mok, Lin Shi
    Brain Science Advances.2021; 7(1): 26.     CrossRef
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    Shintaro Saito, Kenichi Nakajima, Lars Edenbrandt, Olof Enqvist, Johannes Ulén, Seigo Kinuya
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Treatable Ataxias: How to Find the Needle in the Haystack?
Albert Stezin, Pramod Kumar Pal
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(3):206-226.   Published online September 7, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22069
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  • 254 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Treatable ataxias are a group of ataxic disorders with specific treatments. These disorders include genetic and metabolic disorders, immune-mediated ataxic disorders, and ataxic disorders associated with infectious and parainfectious etiology, vascular causes, toxins and chemicals, and endocrinopathies. This review provides a comprehensive overview of different treatable ataxias. The major metabolic and genetic treatable ataxic disorders include ataxia with vitamin E deficiency, abetalipoproteinemia, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis, Niemann-Pick disease type C, autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia due to coenzyme Q10 deficiency, glucose transporter type 1 deficiency, and episodic ataxia type 2. The treatment of these disorders includes the replacement of deficient cofactors and vitamins, dietary modifications, and other specific treatments. Treatable ataxias with immune-mediated etiologies include gluten ataxia, anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody-associated ataxia, steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis, Miller-Fisher syndrome, multiple sclerosis, and paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Although dietary modification with a gluten-free diet is adequate in gluten ataxia, other autoimmune ataxias are managed by short-course steroids, plasma exchange, or immunomodulation. For autoimmune ataxias secondary to malignancy, treatment of tumor can reduce ataxic symptoms. Chronic alcohol consumption, antiepileptics, anticancer drugs, exposure to insecticides, heavy metals, and recreational drugs are potentially avoidable and treatable causes of ataxia. Infective and parainfectious causes of cerebellar ataxias include acute cerebellitis, postinfectious ataxia, Whipple’s disease, meningoencephalitis, and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. These disorders are treated with steroids and antibiotics. Recognizing treatable disorders is of paramount importance when dealing with ataxias given that early treatment can prevent permanent neurological sequelae.
COVID-19: An Early Review of Its Global Impact and Considerations for Parkinson’s Disease Patient Care
Roongroj Bhidayasiri, Sasivimol Virameteekul, Jong-Min Kim, Pramod Kr. Pal, Sun-Ju Chung
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(2):105-114.   Published online April 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20042
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  • 42 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
While many infectious disorders are unknown to most neurologists, COVID-19 is very different. It has impacted neurologists and other health care workers, not only in our professional lives but also through the fear and panic within our own families, colleagues, patients and their families, and even in the wider public. COVID-19 affects all sorts of individuals, but the elderly with underlying chronic conditions are particularly at risk of severe disease, or even death. Parkinson’s disease (PD) shares a common profile as an age-dependent degenerative disorder, frequently associated with comorbidities, particularly cardiovascular diseases, so PD patients will almost certainly fall into the high-risk group. Therefore, the aim of this review is to explore the risk of COVID-19 in PD based on the susceptibility to severe disease, its impact on PD disease severity, potential long-term sequelae, and difficulties of PD management during this outbreak, where neurologists face various challenges on how we can maintain effective care for PD patients without exposing them, or ourselves, to the risk of infection. It is less than six months since the identification of the original COVID-19 case on New Year’s Eve 2019, so it is still too early to fully understand the natural history of COVID-19 and the evidence on COVID-19-related PD is scant. Though the possibilities presented are speculative, they are theory-based, and supported by prior evidence from other neurotrophic viruses closely related to SARS-CoV-2. Neurologists should be on high alert and vigilant for potential acute and chronic complications when encountering PD patients who are suspected of having COVID-19.

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Principles of Electrophysiological Assessments for Movement Disorders
Kai-Hsiang Stanley Chen, Robert Chen
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(1):27-38.   Published online January 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.19064
  • 10,395 View
  • 881 Download
  • 23 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Electrophysiological studies can provide objective and quantifiable assessments of movement disorders. They are useful in the diagnosis of hyperkinetic movement disorders, particularly tremors and myoclonus. The most commonly used measures are surface electromyography (sEMG), electroencephalography (EEG) and accelerometry. Frequency and coherence analyses of sEMG signals may reveal the nature of tremors and the source of the tremors. The effects of voluntary tapping, ballistic movements and weighting of the limbs can help to distinguish between organic and functional tremors. The presence of Bereitschafts-potentials and beta-band desynchronization recorded by EEG before movement onset provide strong evidence for functional movement disorders. EMG burst durations, distributions and muscle recruitment orders may identify and classify myoclonus to cortical, subcortical or spinal origins and help in the diagnosis of functional myoclonus. Organic and functional cervical dystonia can potentially be distinguished by EMG power spectral analysis. Several reflex circuits, such as the long latency reflex, blink reflex and startle reflex, can be elicited with different types of external stimuli and are useful in the assessment of myoclonus, excessive startle and stiff person syndrome. However, limitations of the tests should be recognized, and the results should be interpreted together with clinical observations.

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Manganese and Movement Disorders: A Review
Dinkar Kulshreshtha, Jacky Ganguly, Mandar Jog
J Mov Disord. 2021;14(2):93-102.   Published online April 6, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20123
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  • 9 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Scientific and technological advances achieved with industrial expansion have led to an ever-increasing demand for heavy metals. This demand has, in turn, led to increased contamination of soil, water and air with these metals. Chronic exposure to metals may be detrimental not only to occupational workers but also to the nonoccupational population exposed to these metals. Manganese (Mn), a commonly used heavy metal, is an essential cofactor for many enzymatic processes that drive biological functions. However, it is also a potential source of neurotoxicity, particularly in the field of movement disorders. The typical manifestation of Mn overexposure is parkinsonism, which may be difficult to differentiate from the more common idiopathic Parkinson’s disease. In addition to environmental exposure to Mn, other potential etiologies causing hypermanganesemia include systemic health conditions, total parenteral nutrition and genetic mutations causing Mn dyshomeostasis. In this review, we critically analyze Mn and discuss its sources of exposure, pathophysiology and clinical manifestations. We have highlighted the global public health impact of Mn and emphasize that movement disorder specialists should record a detailed social and occupational history to ensure that a toxic etiology is not misdiagnosed as a neurodegenerative disease. In the absence of a definite therapeutic option, early diagnosis and timely institution of preventive measures are the keys to managing its toxic effects.

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    Jae-Hyeok Lee, Jin-Hong Shin
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    Abhishek.P.R. Nadig, Bader Huwaimel, Ahmed Alobaida, El-Sayed Khafagy, Hadil Faris Alotaibi, Afrasim Moin, Amr Selim Abu Lila, Suman, Sahyadri. M, K.L. Krishna
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  • Çalışma Yaşamında Manganez Maruz Kalımının Sağlık Etkileri ve Parkinsonizm
    Zehra GÖK METİN, Abdulsamet SANDAL, Ali Naci YILDIZ
    Karaelmas İş Sağlığı ve Güvenliği Dergisi.2021; 5(2): 147.     CrossRef
Immune-Mediated Cerebellar Ataxias: Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment Based on Immunological and Physiological Mechanisms
Hiroshi Mitoma, Mario Manto, Marios Hadjivassiliou
J Mov Disord. 2021;14(1):10-28.   Published online January 12, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20040
  • 7,246 View
  • 537 Download
  • 18 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Since the first description of immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias (IMCAs) by Charcot in 1868, several milestones have been reached in our understanding of this group of neurological disorders. IMCAs have diverse etiologies, such as gluten ataxia, postinfectious cerebellitis, paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration, opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome, anti-GAD ataxia, and primary autoimmune cerebellar ataxia. The cerebellum, a vulnerable autoimmune target of the nervous system, has remarkable capacities (collectively known as the cerebellar reserve, closely linked to plasticity) to compensate and restore function following various pathological insults. Therefore, good prognosis is expected when immune-mediated therapeutic interventions are delivered during early stages when the cerebellar reserve can be preserved. However, some types of IMCAs show poor responses to immunotherapies, even if such therapies are introduced at an early stage. Thus, further research is needed to enhance our understanding of the autoimmune mechanisms underlying IMCAs, as such research could potentially lead to the development of more effective immunotherapies. We underscore the need to pursue the identification of robust biomarkers.

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    Marios Hadjivassiliou, R. A. Grϋnewald
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Long-Term Outcomes of Genetic Parkinson’s Disease
Jan O. Aasly
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(2):81-96.   Published online May 29, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.19080
  • 10,195 View
  • 368 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that affects 1–2% of people by the age of 70 years. Age is the most important risk factor, and most cases are sporadic without any known environmental or genetic causes. Since the late 1990s, mutations in the genes SNCA, PRKN, LRRK2, PINK1, DJ-1, VPS35, and GBA have been shown to be important risk factors for PD. In addition, common variants with small effect sizes are now recognized to modulate the risk for PD. Most studies in genetic PD have focused on finding new genes, but few have studied the long-term outcome of patients with the specific genetic PD forms. Patients with known genetic PD have now been followed for more than 20 years, and we see that they may have distinct and different prognoses. New therapeutic possibilities are emerging based on the genetic cause underlying the disease. Future medication may be based on the pathophysiology individualized to the patient’s genetic background. The challenge is to find the biological consequences of different genetic variants. In this review, the clinical patterns and long-term prognoses of the most common genetic PD variants are presented.

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    Tinh Thi Nguyen, Yun Joong Kim, Thuy Thi Lai, Phuong Thi Nguyen, Young Ho Koh, Linh Thi Nhat Nguyen, Hyeo-il Ma, Young Eun Kim
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Original Article
The Queensland Parkinson’s Project: An Overview of 20 Years of Mortality from Parkinson’s Disease
Peter Cornelis Poortvliet, Alexander Gluch, Peter A. Silburn, George D. Mellick
J Mov Disord. 2021;14(1):34-41.   Published online December 7, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20034
  • 6,332 View
  • 164 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
The consensus is that life expectancy for individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD) is reduced, but estimations vary. We aimed to provide an overview of 20 years of mortality and risk factor data from the Queensland Parkinson’s Project.
Methods
The analysis included 1,334 PD and 1,127 control participants. Preliminary analysis of baseline characteristics (sex, age at onset, family history, smoking status, pesticide exposure, depression and neurosurgery) was conducted, and Kaplan–Meier curves were generated for each potential risk factor. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated comparing this cohort to the general Australian population. Cox proportional hazards regression modeling was used to analyze potential predictors of mortality.
Results
In total, 625 (46.8%) PD and 237 (21.0%) control participants were deceased. Mean disease duration until death was 15.3 ± 7.84 years. Average ages at death were 78.0 ± 7.4 years and 80.4 ± 8.4 years for the deceased PD and control participants, respectively. Mortality was significantly increased for PD in general {SMR = 2.75 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.53–2.96]; p = 0.001}. SMRs were slightly higher for women and those with an age of onset before 60 years. Multivariate analysis showed that deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment was associated with lower mortality [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.76; 95% CI: 0.59–0.98], while occasional pesticide exposure increased mortality risk (HR = 1.48; 95% CI: 1.17–1.88). Family history of PD, smoking and depression were not independent predictors of mortality.
Conclusion
Mortality in PD is increased. Sex, age at onset and occasional pesticide exposure were independent determinants of increased mortality, while DBS treatment was associated with reduced mortality.

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  • Mortality of Parkinson’s disease in Italy from 1980 to 2015
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Review Articles
Nutrition and Lifestyle Interventions for Managing Parkinson’s Disease: A Narrative Review
Tracy Lister
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(2):97-104.   Published online May 29, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20006
  • 9,675 View
  • 496 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
The etiology of Parkinson’s disease (PD) is not fully understood, but environmental toxin overexposure, increased intestinal permeability, and dysbiosis related to nutrition and lifestyle habits are thought to be contributors. Considering these nutrition and lifestyle implications, there is a lack of practice-based programs utilizing interventions for managing symptoms or slowing the progression of the disease. The purpose of this narrative review was to identify relevant research related to nutrition and lifestyle interventions for PD, evaluate the research utilizing the evidence analysis process of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics to assess the quality of each research article, and group the research into categories. A grading of recommendations assessment, development and evaluation (GRADE) of either good, fair, limited, or not assignable was allocated to each category of research, including diet patterns, vitamin D, B-complex, omega-3 fatty acids, coenzyme Q10, probiotics, physical activity, stress, and sleep. An intervention based on the research presented in the review may be utilized for coaching people with PD on symptom management.

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  • Effect of vitamin D and other indicators of phosphorus-calcium metabolism on cognitive functions and quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease
    D. A. Novotnyy, N. G. Zhukova, L. P. Shperling, V. A. Stolyarova, I. A. Zhukova, A. E. Agasheva, S. V. Shtaimets, O. A. Druzhinina, I. V. Shirokikh
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  • Do Naturally Occurring Antioxidants Protect Against Neurodegeneration of the Dopaminergic System? A Systematic Revision in Animal Models of Parkinson's Disease
    Carmen Costas, Lilian R.F. Faro
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    Jung Hwan Shin, Han-Joon Kim, Chan Young Lee, Hee Jin Chang, Kyung Ah Woo, Beomseok Jeon
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    Christine C. Ferguson, Seung Eun Jung, Jeannine C. Lawrence, Joy W. Douglas, Anne Halli-Tierney, Chuong Bui, Amy C. Ellis
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Gene Therapy for Huntington’s Disease: The Final Strategy for a Cure?
Seulgi Byun, Mijung Lee, Manho Kim
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(1):15-20.   Published online November 17, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21006
  • 3,612 View
  • 350 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Huntington’s disease (HD) has become a target of the first clinical trials for gene therapy among movement disorders with a genetic origin. More than 100 clinical trials regarding HD have been tried, but all failed, although there were some improvements limited to symptomatic support. Compared to other neurogenetic disorders, HD is known to have a single genetic target. Thus, this is an advantage and its cure is more feasible than any other movement disorder with heterogeneous genetic causes. In this review paper, the authors attempt to cover the characteristics of HD itself while providing an overview of the gene transfer methods currently being researched, and will introduce an experimental trial with a preclinical model of HD followed by an update on the ongoing clinical trials for patients with HD.

Citations

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  • Mitochondrial organization and structure are compromised in fibroblasts from patients with Huntington’s disease
    Marie Vanisova, Hana Stufkova, Michaela Kohoutova, Tereza Rakosnikova, Jana Krizova, Jiri Klempir, Irena Rysankova, Jan Roth, Jiri Zeman, Hana Hansikova
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    Zainab Irfan, Sofia Khanam, Varnita Karmakar, Sayeed Mohammed Firdous, Bothaina Samih Ismail Abou El Khier, Ilyas Khan, Muneeb U. Rehman, Andleeb Khan
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JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders