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Letter to the editor
Task-Specific Drinking Tremor
Krisztina Benedek, Heidi Bryde Biernat, Carsten Eckhart Thomsen, Merete Bakke
Received July 1, 2022  Accepted August 15, 2022  Published online November 10, 2022  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22103    [Epub ahead of print]
  • 148 View
  • 16 Download
PDFSupplementary Material
Viewpoint
Challenges in Parkinson’s Disease Care—In Light of the COVID-19 Pandemic
Kyung Ah Woo, Han-Joon Kim, Beomseok Jeon
Received July 6, 2022  Accepted August 18, 2022  Published online November 10, 2022  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22085    [Epub ahead of print]
  • 98 View
  • 12 Download
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Letter to the editor
Successful Treatment of Biphasic and Peak-dose Dyskinesia With Combined Unilateral Subthalamic Nucleus and Contralateral Globus Pallidus Interna Deep Brain Stimulation
Zhitong Zeng, Zhengyu Lin, Peng Huang, Halimureti Paerhati, Chencheng Zhang, Dianyou Li
Received May 20, 2022  Accepted August 12, 2022  Published online November 10, 2022  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22081    [Epub ahead of print]
  • 153 View
  • 10 Download
PDFSupplementary Material
Viewpoint
Mask on, Mask off: Subclinical Parkinson’s Disease Unveiled by COVID-19
Milan Beckers, Bastiaan R Bloem, Rick C Helmich
Received May 4, 2022  Accepted August 24, 2022  Published online November 10, 2022  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22067    [Epub ahead of print]
  • 237 View
  • 28 Download
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Review Article
Subjective Cognitive Complaints in Cognitively Normal Patients With Parkinson’s Disease: A Systematic Review
Jin Yong Hong, Phil Hyu Lee
Received April 15, 2022  Accepted August 15, 2022  Published online November 10, 2022  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22059    [Epub ahead of print]
  • 191 View
  • 26 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Subjective cognitive complaints (SCCs) refer to self-perceived cognitive decline and are related to objective cognitive decline. SCCs in cognitively normal individuals are considered a preclinical sign of subsequent cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer’s disease, and SCCs in cognitively normal patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) are also gaining attention. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of the current research on SCCs in cognitively normal patients with PD. A systematic search found a lack of consistency in the methodologies used to define and measure SCCs. Although the association between SCCs and objective cognitive performance in cognitively normal patients with PD is controversial, SCCs appear to be predictive of subsequent cognitive decline. These findings support the clinical value of SCCs in cognitively normal status in PD; however, further convincing evidence from biomarker studies is needed to provide a pathophysiological basis for these findings. Additionally, a consensus on the definition and assessment of SCCs is needed for further investigations.
Viewpoint
Teaching Research Methods to Young Neurologists: The Erice International Courses
Walter A. Rocca, Paolo Ragonese, Marco D'Ameilo, Giovanni Savettieri
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(3):227-231.   Published online September 22, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22130
  • 367 View
  • 29 Download
PDF
Letter to the editor
Presynaptic Dopaminergic Dysfunction Was Overestimated in Huntington’s Disease Presenting as Young Age-Onset Parkinsonism
Taewon Kim, Byeong Joo Choi, Chul Hyoung Lyoo
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(3):293-295.   Published online September 22, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22071
  • 235 View
  • 19 Download
PDFSupplementary Material
Review Article
Treatable Ataxias: How to Find the Needle in the Haystack?
Albert Stezin, Pramod Kumar Pal
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(3):206-226.   Published online September 7, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22069
  • 1,668 View
  • 254 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Treatable ataxias are a group of ataxic disorders with specific treatments. These disorders include genetic and metabolic disorders, immune-mediated ataxic disorders, and ataxic disorders associated with infectious and parainfectious etiology, vascular causes, toxins and chemicals, and endocrinopathies. This review provides a comprehensive overview of different treatable ataxias. The major metabolic and genetic treatable ataxic disorders include ataxia with vitamin E deficiency, abetalipoproteinemia, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis, Niemann-Pick disease type C, autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia due to coenzyme Q10 deficiency, glucose transporter type 1 deficiency, and episodic ataxia type 2. The treatment of these disorders includes the replacement of deficient cofactors and vitamins, dietary modifications, and other specific treatments. Treatable ataxias with immune-mediated etiologies include gluten ataxia, anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody-associated ataxia, steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis, Miller-Fisher syndrome, multiple sclerosis, and paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Although dietary modification with a gluten-free diet is adequate in gluten ataxia, other autoimmune ataxias are managed by short-course steroids, plasma exchange, or immunomodulation. For autoimmune ataxias secondary to malignancy, treatment of tumor can reduce ataxic symptoms. Chronic alcohol consumption, antiepileptics, anticancer drugs, exposure to insecticides, heavy metals, and recreational drugs are potentially avoidable and treatable causes of ataxia. Infective and parainfectious causes of cerebellar ataxias include acute cerebellitis, postinfectious ataxia, Whipple’s disease, meningoencephalitis, and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. These disorders are treated with steroids and antibiotics. Recognizing treatable disorders is of paramount importance when dealing with ataxias given that early treatment can prevent permanent neurological sequelae.
Original Articles
Potential Link Between Cognition and Motor Reserve in Patients With Parkinson’s Disease
Seok Jong Chung, Yae Ji Kim, Yun Joong Kim, Hye Sun Lee, Mijin Yun, Phil Hyu Lee, Yong Jeong, Young H. Sohn
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(3):249-257.   Published online September 7, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22063
  • 540 View
  • 61 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
To investigate whether there is a link between cognitive function and motor reserve (i.e., individual capacity to cope with nigrostriatal dopamine depletion) in patients with newly diagnosed Parkinson’s disease (PD).
Methods
A total of 163 patients with drug-naïve PD who underwent 18F-FP-CIT PET, brain MRI, and a detailed neuropsychological test were enrolled. We estimated individual motor reserve based on initial motor deficits and striatal dopamine depletion using a residual model. We performed correlation analyses between motor reserve estimates and cognitive composite scores. Diffusion connectometry analysis was performed to map the white matter fiber tracts, of which fractional anisotropy (FA) values were well correlated with motor reserve estimates. Additionally, Cox regression analysis was used to assess the effect of initial motor reserve on the risk of dementia conversion.
Results
The motor reserve estimate was positively correlated with the composite score of the verbal memory function domain (γ = 0.246) and with the years of education (γ = 0.251). Connectometry analysis showed that FA values in the left fornix were positively correlated with the motor reserve estimate, while no fiber tracts were negatively correlated with the motor reserve estimate. Cox regression analysis demonstrated that higher motor reserve estimates tended to be associated with a lower risk of dementia conversion (hazard ratio, 0.781; 95% confidence interval, 0.576–1.058).
Conclusion
The present study demonstrated that the motor reserve estimate was well correlated with verbal memory function and with white matter integrity in the left fornix, suggesting a possible link between cognition and motor reserve in patients with PD.
Association Between Gait and Dysautonomia in Patients With De Novo Parkinson’s Disease: Forward Gait Versus Backward Gait
Seon-Min Lee, Mina Lee, Eun Ji Lee, Rae On Kim, Yongduk Kim, Kyum-Yil Kwon
Received March 25, 2022  Accepted June 27, 2022  Published online September 7, 2022  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22045    [Epub ahead of print]
  • 599 View
  • 97 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Studies on gait and autonomic dysfunction have been insufficient so far, particularly de novo Parkinson’s disease (PD). The aim of this study was to identify the association between gait dynamics and autonomic dysfunction in patients with de novo PD.
Methods
A total 38 patients with de novo PD were retrospectively included in this study. Details of patients’ dysautonomia were assessed using the Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson’s Disease-Autonomic Dysfunction (SCOPA-AUT). For assessment of gait, a computerized gait analysis was performed using the GAITRite system for forward gait and backward gait. High SCOPA-AUT score (PD-HSAS) group and low SCOPA-AUT score (PD-LSAS) group were identified according to their SCOPA-AUT scores.
Results
Nineteen (50%) patients with high SCOPA-AUT scores above median value (12.5) were assigned into the PD-HSAS group and others were assigned to the PD-LSAS group. Compared with the PD-LSAS group, the PD-HSAS group exhibited slower gait, shorter stride, decreased cadence, increased double support phase, decreased swing phase, and increased variability in swing time. Total SCOPA-AUT score showed significantly positive correlations with gait variability and instability but a negative correlation with gait hypokinesia. In subdomain analysis, urinary dysautonomia was highly associated with impairment of gait dynamics. All significant results were found to be more remarkable in backward gait than in forward gait.
Conclusion
Our findings suggest that alteration in gait dynamics, especially backward gait, is highly associated with autonomic dysfunction in patients with de novo PD.
Brief communication
Sensitivity of Detecting Alpha-Synuclein Accumulation in the Gastrointestinal Tract and Tissue Volume Examined
Chaewon Shin, Seong-Ik Kim, Sung-Hye Park, Jung Hwan Shin, Chan Young Lee, Han-Kwang Yang, Hyuk-Joon Lee, Seong-Ho Kong, Yun-Suhk Suh, Han-Joon Kim, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(3):264-268.   Published online July 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22042
  • 932 View
  • 52 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
This study aimed to evaluate whether a larger tissue volume increases the sensitivity of detecting alpha-synuclein (AS) pathology in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.
Methods
Nine patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) or idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep disorder (iRBD) who underwent GI operation and had full-depth intestinal blocks were included. All patients were selected from our previous study population. A total of 10 slides (5 serial sections from the proximal and distal blocks) per patient were analyzed.
Results
In previous studies, pathologic evaluation revealed phosphorylated AS (+) in 5/9 patients (55.6%) and in 1/5 controls (20.0%); in this extensive examination, this increased to 8/9 patients (88.9%) but remained the same in controls (20.0%). The severity and distribution of positive findings were similar between patients with iRBD and PD.
Conclusion
Examining a large tissue volume increased the sensitivity of detecting AS accumulation in the GI tract.
Letters to the editor
Blacksmith’s Dystonia Is Another Task-Specific Dystonia: From Past to Present
Min Seung Kim, Don Gueu Park, Jung Han Yoon
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(3):284-285.   Published online July 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22037
  • 460 View
  • 94 Download
PDFSupplementary Material
Continuous 24-h Levodopa-Carbidopa Intestinal Gel Infusion After a Levodopa Holiday Suppressed Refractory Dyskinesia Despite Increasing Levodopa Dose
Noriko Nishikawa, Taku Hatano, Daiki Kamiyama, Haruna Haginiwa-Hasegawa, Genko Oyama, Nobutaka Hattori
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(3):290-292.   Published online July 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22021
  • 428 View
  • 97 Download
PDFSupplementary Material
Multiple Sclerosis-Related Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia: Long Term, Favorable Response to Lacosamide
Vasiliki Poulidou, Martha Spilioti, Maria Moschou, Nickolas Papanikolaou, Antonios Drevelegas, Sotirios Papagiannopoulos, Dimitrios Kazis, Vasilios K. Kimiskidis
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(3):286-289.   Published online July 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22016
  • 517 View
  • 124 Download
PDFSupplementary Material
Case Report
Nearly Abolished Dopamine Transporter Uptake in a Patient With a Novel FBXO7 Mutation
Eun Young Kim, Seon Young Kim, Youngduk Seo, Chaewon Shin
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(3):269-272.   Published online July 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22006
  • 842 View
  • 41 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Mutations in the F-box only protein 7 (FBXO7) gene are the cause of autosomal recessive parkinsonian-pyramidal syndrome. Herein, we report a patient with a novel FBXO7 mutation with a unique clinical presentation. A 43-year-old male visited our hospital with complaints of progressing gait disturbance since a generalized tonic clonic seizure. There were no past neurological symptoms or familial disorders. Neurological examination revealed bradykinesia, masked face, stooped posture, parkinsonian gait, and postural instability. The bilateral uptake by dopamine transporters was nearly abolished, as determined by N-(3-[18F]fluoropropyl)- 2β-carbon ethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl) nortropane positron emission tomography (18F-FP-CIT PET). Next-generation sequencing revealed a heterozygous c.1066_1069delTCTG (p.Ser356ArgfsTer56) frameshift variant and a heterozygous c.80G>A (p.Arg27His) missense variant of the FBXO7 gene. The patient’s specific clinical features, medication-refractory parkinsonism and seizures further broaden the spectrum of FBXO7 mutations. The nearly abolished dopamine transporter uptake identified by 18F-FP-CIT PET is frequently found in patients with FBXO7 mutations, which is different from the usual rostrocaudal gradient that is observed in patients with Parkinson’s disease.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The characteristics of FBXO7 and its role in human diseases
    Yeling Zhong, Jinyun Li, Meng Ye, Xiaofeng Jin
    Gene.2023; 851: 146972.     CrossRef

JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders