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From articles published in Journal of Movement Disorders during the past two years (2022 ~ ).

Original Article
Premonitory Urges Reconsidered: Urge Location Corresponds to Tic Location in Patients With Primary Tic Disorders
Jana Essing, Ewgeni Jakubovski, Nikolas Psathakis, Sinan N Cevirme, James F Leckman, Kirsten R Müller-Vahl
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(1):43-52.   Published online January 25, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21045
  • 5,913 View
  • 225 Download
  • 10 Web of Science
  • 14 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
In patients with Tourette syndrome and other primary tic disorders (PTDs), tics are typically preceded by premonitory urges (PUs). To date, only a few studies have investigated the location and frequency of PUs, and contrary to clinical experience, the results suggest that PUs are not located in the same anatomic region as the tics. This study aimed to further explore PU location and frequency in detail, differentiating the kind and complexity of the corresponding tics, in a large sample of patients with PTD.
Methods
A total of 291 adult (≥ 18 years) patients with a confirmed diagnosis of chronic PTD were included. The study was conducted online, assement included tics and the general characterization of PUs and a sophisticated body drawing for locating PUs.
Results
We found that PUs were located in the same body area as, or in direct proximity to, the corresponding tic. Most frequently, PUs were located in the face and at the head (62.1%). Compared with simple tics, complex (motor and vocal) tics were more often preceded by a PU; but there was no difference in PU frequency observed between motor tics and vocal tics. PUs were more often experienced at the front than at the back of the body (73% vs. 27%), while there was no difference between the right and left sides (41.6% vs. 41.3%).
Conclusion
The strong association between PU and tic location further supports the hypothesis that PUs represent the core of PTD. Accordingly, future therapies should focus on treating PUs to achieve greater tic reduction.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Door-To-Door Video-Enhanced Prevalence Study of Tourette Disorder Among African Americans
    Catherine Striley, Kevin J. Black, Natalie E. Chichetto, Lauren Vagelakos
    Evidence-Based Practice in Child and Adolescent Mental Health.2024; 9(2): 281.     CrossRef
  • Functional Tic‐Like Behaviors: A Common Comorbidity in Patients with Tourette Syndrome
    Kirsten R. Müller‐Vahl, Anna Pisarenko, Carolin Fremer, Martina Haas, Ewgeni Jakubovski, Natalia Szejko
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice.2024; 11(3): 227.     CrossRef
  • Parent-Report Sleep Disturbances and Everyday Executive Functioning Difficulties in Children with Tourette Syndrome
    Lisa Keenan, Jessica Bramham, Michelle Downes
    Developmental Neuropsychology.2024; 49(1): 39.     CrossRef
  • Premonitory Urge in Patients with Tics and Functional Tic‐like Behaviors
    Natalia Szejko, Julian Fletcher, Davide Martino, Tamara Pringsheim
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice.2024; 11(3): 276.     CrossRef
  • A meta-analysis of transcranial magnetic stimulation in Tourette syndrome
    Elizabeth R. Steuber, Joseph F. McGuire
    Journal of Psychiatric Research.2024; 173: 34.     CrossRef
  • Sensory Phenomenon Assessment Scale: a new tool for assessment of tic-associated sensations
    Xianbin Wang, Yanlin Li, Liping Yu, Hui Xu, Anyi Zhang, Wenyan Zhang, Zhongliang Jiang, Yonghua Cui, Ying Li
    Frontiers in Psychiatry.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • We've all been wrong about provisional tic disorder
    Sarah C. Grossen, Amanda L. Arbuckle, Emily C. Bihun, Jonathan M. Koller, David Y. Song, Angela M. Reiersen, Bradley L. Schlaggar, Deanna J. Greene, Kevin J. Black
    Comprehensive Psychiatry.2024; 134: 152510.     CrossRef
  • Premonitory Urge and Tic Severity, Comorbidities, and Quality of Life in Chronic Tic Disorders
    Valerie Brandt, Jana Essing, Ewgeni Jakubovski, Kirsten Müller‐Vahl
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice.2023; 10(6): 922.     CrossRef
  • Motor awareness, volition, and the cortical neurophysiology of simple motor tics
    Aysegul Gunduz, Christos Ganos
    Clinical Neurophysiology.2023; 151: 130.     CrossRef
  • Tourette syndrome research highlights from 2022
    Andreas Hartmann, Per Andrén, Cyril Atkinson-Clément, Virginie Czernecki, Cécile Delorme, Nanette Marinette Monique Debes, Kirsten Müller-Vahl, Peristera Paschou, Natalia Szejko, Apostolia Topaloudi, Keisuke Ueda, Kevin J. Black
    F1000Research.2023; 12: 826.     CrossRef
  • Tourette syndrome research highlights from 2022
    Andreas Hartmann, Per Andrén, Cyril Atkinson-Clément, Virginie Czernecki, Cécile Delorme, Nanette Marinette Monique Debes, Kirsten Müller-Vahl, Peristera Paschou, Natalia Szejko, Apostolia Topaloudi, Keisuke Ueda, Kevin J. Black
    F1000Research.2023; 12: 826.     CrossRef
  • Clinical evaluation of premonitory urges in children and adolescents using the Chinese version of Individualized Premonitory Urge for Tics Scale
    Guanghua Che, Wenjing Ren, Joseph F. McGuire, Ping Li, Zhiruo Zhao, Jing Tian, Jinyuan Zhang, Yue Zhang
    Frontiers in Psychiatry.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Mass social media-induced illness presenting with Tourette-like behavior
    Carolin Fremer, Natalia Szejko, Anna Pisarenko, Martina Haas, Luise Laudenbach, Claudia Wegener, Kirsten R. Müller-Vahl
    Frontiers in Psychiatry.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Tics bei Erwachsenen
    Tina Rawish, Gesine Sallandt, Alexander Münchau
    NeuroTransmitter.2022; 33(12): 38.     CrossRef
Review Article
Evidence of Inflammation in Parkinson’s Disease and Its Contribution to Synucleinopathy
Thuy Thi Lai, Yun Joong Kim, Hyeo-il Ma, Young Eun Kim
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(1):1-14.   Published online November 3, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21078
  • 7,739 View
  • 546 Download
  • 12 Web of Science
  • 14 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Accumulation of alpha-synuclein (αSyn) protein in neurons is a renowned pathological hallmark of Parkinson’s disease (PD). In addition, accumulating evidence indicates that activated inflammatory responses are involved in the pathogenesis of PD. Thus, achieving a better understanding of the interaction between inflammation and synucleinopathy in relation to the PD process will facilitate the development of promising disease-modifying therapies. In this review, the evidence of inflammation in PD is discussed, and human, animal, and laboratory studies relevant to the relationship between inflammation and αSyn are explored as well as new therapeutic targets associated with this relationship.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Recent advances of nanomaterials for intervention in Parkinson’s disease in the context of anti-inflammation
    Ruoyu Zhang, Xiaotong Chen, Yuanyuan Cheng, Zixuan Chen, Xiaoqiong Li, Yulin Deng
    Coordination Chemistry Reviews.2024; 502: 215616.     CrossRef
  • Microglial inhibition alleviates alpha-synuclein propagation and neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s disease mouse model
    Thuy Thi Lai, Young Eun Kim, Linh Thi Nhat Nguyen, Tinh Thi Nguyen, In Hee Kwak, Franziska Richter, Yun Joong Kim, Hyeo-il Ma
    npj Parkinson's Disease.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • New Insights into Oxidative Stress and Inflammatory Response in Neurodegenerative Diseases
    Eveljn Scarian, Camilla Viola, Francesca Dragoni, Rosalinda Di Gerlando, Bartolo Rizzo, Luca Diamanti, Stella Gagliardi, Matteo Bordoni, Orietta Pansarasa
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2024; 25(5): 2698.     CrossRef
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    Tatsuhiro Terada, Tomoyasu Bunai, Takanori Hashizume, Takashi Matsudaira, Masamichi Yokokura, Hirotsugu Takashima, Takashi Konishi, Tomokazu Obi, Yasuomi Ouchi
    Scientific Reports.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Saeed Mohammad Soleymani, Farhad Assarzadegan, Seyed Amir Hassan Habibi, Arash Mahboubi, Hadi Esmaily
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2024; : 107051.     CrossRef
  • Neuroinflammation and Immune Dysfunction in the Mechanisms of Development of Parkinson’s Disease
    G. V. Idova, E. L. Alperina, S. Ya. Zhanaeva
    Neuroscience and Behavioral Physiology.2023; 53(9): 1534.     CrossRef
  • Vitamin D3 actions on astrocyte cells: A target for therapeutic strategy in Parkinson’s disease?
    Erlânia Alves de Siqueira, Emanuel Paula Magalhães, Ramon Róseo Paula Pessoa Bezerra de Menezes, Tiago Lima Sampaio, Danya Bandeira Lima, Conceição da Silva Martins, Kelly Rose Tavares Neves, Gerly Anne de Castro Brito, Alice Maria Costa Martins, Glauce S
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    Ran Zheng, Yiqun Yan, Shaobing Dai, Yang Ruan, Ying Chen, Chenjun Hu, Zhihao Lin, Naijia Xue, Zhe Song, Yi Liu, Baorong Zhang, Jiali Pu
    Journal of Neuroinflammation.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Qiu-Qin Han, Weidong Le
    Neuroscience Bulletin.2023; 39(5): 832.     CrossRef
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    Yu Liang, Guangshang Zhong, Mingxin Ren, Tingting Sun, Yangyang Li, Ming Ye, Caiyun Ma, Yu Guo, Changqing Liu
    NeuroMolecular Medicine.2023; 25(4): 471.     CrossRef
  • Anethole attenuates motor dysfunctions, striatal neuronal activity deficiency and blood brain barrier permeability by decreasing striatal α-synuclein and oxidative stress in rotenone-induced Parkinson’s disease of male rats
    Sadegh Moradi Vastegani, Seyed Esmaeil Khoshnam, Samireh Ghafouri, Nima Bakhtiari, Yaghoob Farbood, Alireza Sarkaki, Wesley Lyeverton Correia Ribeiro
    PLOS ONE.2023; 18(11): e0294612.     CrossRef
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    G. V. Idova, E. L. Alperina, S. Ya. Zhanaeva
    Журнал высшей нервной деятельности им. И.П. Павлова.2023; 73(4): 454.     CrossRef
  • A2A Adenosine Receptor Antagonists: Are Triazolotriazine and Purine Scaffolds Interchangeable?
    Andrea Spinaci, Catia Lambertucci, Michela Buccioni, Diego Dal Ben, Claudia Graiff, Maria Cristina Barbalace, Silvana Hrelia, Cristina Angeloni, Seyed Khosrow Tayebati, Massimo Ubaldi, Alessio Masi, Karl-Norbert Klotz, Rosaria Volpini, Gabriella Marucci
    Molecules.2022; 27(8): 2386.     CrossRef
  • Oligomeropathies, inflammation and prion protein binding
    Gianluigi Forloni, Pietro La Vitola, Claudia Balducci
    Frontiers in Neuroscience.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Article
Fecal Calprotectin in Parkinson’s Disease and Multiple System Atrophy
Jia Wei Hor, Shen-Yang Lim, Eng Soon Khor, Kah Kian Chong, Sze Looi Song, Norlinah Mohamed Ibrahim, Cindy Shuan Ju Teh, Chun Wie Chong, Ida Normiha Hilmi, Ai Huey Tan
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(2):106-114.   Published online December 24, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21085
  • 6,580 View
  • 353 Download
  • 12 Web of Science
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Converging evidence suggests that intestinal inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Previous studies on fecal calprotectin in Parkinson’s disease (PD) were limited by small sample sizes, and literature regarding intestinal inflammation in multiple system atrophy (MSA) is very scarce. We investigated the levels of fecal calprotectin, a marker of intestinal inflammation, in PD and MSA.
Methods
We recruited 169 subjects (71 PD, 38 MSA, and 60 age-similar nonneurological controls). Clinico-demographic data were collected. PD and MSA were subtyped and the severity assessed using the MDS-UPDRS and UMSARS, respectively. Fecal calprotectin and blood immune markers were analyzed.
Results
Compared to controls (median: 35.7 [IQR: 114.2] μg/g), fecal calprotectin was significantly elevated in PD (median: 95.6 [IQR: 162.1] μg/g, p = 0.003) and even higher in MSA (median: 129.5 [IQR: 373.8] μg/g, p = 0.002). A significant interaction effect with age was observed; between-group differences were significant only in older subjects (i.e., ≥ 61 years) and became more apparent with increasing age. A total of 28.9% of MSA and 18.3% of PD patients had highly abnormal fecal calprotectin levels (≥ 250 μg/g); however, this difference was only significant for MSA compared to controls. Fecal calprotectin correlated moderately with selected blood immune markers in PD, but not with clinical features of PD or MSA.
Conclusions
Elevated fecal calprotectin suggests a role for intestinal inflammation in PD and MSA. A more complete understanding of gut immune alterations could open up new avenues of research and treatment for these debilitating diseases.

Citations

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  • Calprotectin in Parkinsonian disease: Anticipation and dedication
    Hayder M. Al-kuraishy, Ali I. Al-Gareeb, Ayah Talal Zaidalkiani, Athanasios Alexiou, Marios Papadakis, Mostafa M. Bahaa, Ammar AL-Faraga, Gaber El-Saber Batiha
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    Antonella Gallo, Marcello Covino, Silvia Baroni, Sara Camilli, Francesca Ibba, Silvia Andaloro, Maria Chiara Agnitelli, Fiammetta Maria Rognoni, Francesco Landi, Massimo Montalto
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  • Nocardia cyriacigeorgica Elicits Gut Disturbances in a Leaky Gut Model of Colitis, but Not the Harmful Cascade Leading to Gut-First Parkinson’s Disease
    João Duarte Magalhães, Emanuel Candeias, Inês Melo-Marques, António E. Abreu, Ana Raquel Pereira-Santos, Ana Raquel Esteves, Sandra Morais Cardoso, Nuno Empadinhas
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Letter to the editor
COVID-19 Associated Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy Presenting as Parkinsonism and Myorhythmia
Tien Lee Ong, Khariah Mat Nor, Yusniza Yusoff, Sapiah Sapuan
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(1):89-92.   Published online November 17, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21063
  • 6,216 View
  • 161 Download
  • 14 Web of Science
  • 12 Crossref
PDFSupplementary Material

Citations

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  • Defining the Clinicoradiologic Syndrome of SARS-CoV-2 Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy
    Vanessa W. Lee, Kai Qian Kam, Ahmad R. Mohamed, Husna Musa, Poorani Anandakrishnan, Qingtang Shen, Alexander F. Palazzo, Russell C. Dale, Ming Lim, Terrence Thomas
    Neurology Neuroimmunology & Neuroinflammation.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Paola Polverino, Antoniangela Cocco, Alberto Albanese
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2024; 123: 106066.     CrossRef
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    Witoon Mitarnun, Metha Apiwattanakul, Thanatchanan Thodthasri, Praewa Tantisungvarakoon, Wilasinee Pangwong
    Neurology and Clinical Neuroscience.2023; 11(1): 49.     CrossRef
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    Wilson K.W. Fung, Alfonso Fasano, Conor Fearon
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Myorhythmia and Other Movement Disorders in Two Patients With Coronavirus Disease 2019 Encephalopathy
    Rebecca Hui Min Hoe, Fan Yang, Siew Kit Shuit, Glenn Khai Wern Yong, Ser Hon Puah, Jennifer Sye Jin Ting, Mucheli Sharavan Sadasiv, Thirugnanam Umapathi
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2023; 16(2): 217.     CrossRef
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    Nil Saez-Calveras, Meredith Bryarly, Meagen Salinas
    Therapeutic Advances in Neurological Disorders.2023; 16: 175628642211503.     CrossRef
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    Shaghayegh Karami, Fattaneh Khalaj, Houman Sotoudeh, Zohreh Tajabadi, Ramin Shahidi, Mohammad Amin Habibi, Mahsa Shirforoush Sattari, Amir Azimi, Seyed Ali Forouzannia, Romina Rafiei, Hamid Reihani, Reza Nemati, Soraya Teimori, Amirmohammad Khalaji, Vida
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Review Articles
Gene Therapy for Huntington’s Disease: The Final Strategy for a Cure?
Seulgi Byun, Mijung Lee, Manho Kim
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(1):15-20.   Published online November 17, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21006
  • 7,877 View
  • 437 Download
  • 14 Web of Science
  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Huntington’s disease (HD) has become a target of the first clinical trials for gene therapy among movement disorders with a genetic origin. More than 100 clinical trials regarding HD have been tried, but all failed, although there were some improvements limited to symptomatic support. Compared to other neurogenetic disorders, HD is known to have a single genetic target. Thus, this is an advantage and its cure is more feasible than any other movement disorder with heterogeneous genetic causes. In this review paper, the authors attempt to cover the characteristics of HD itself while providing an overview of the gene transfer methods currently being researched, and will introduce an experimental trial with a preclinical model of HD followed by an update on the ongoing clinical trials for patients with HD.

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Current Status and Future Perspectives on Stem Cell-Based Therapies for Parkinson’s Disease
Young Cha, Tae-Yoon Park, Pierre Leblanc, Kwang-Soo Kim
J Mov Disord. 2023;16(1):22-41.   Published online January 12, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22141
  • 7,791 View
  • 513 Download
  • 13 Web of Science
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer’s disease, affecting 1%–2% of the population over the age of 65. As the population ages, it is anticipated that the burden on society will significantly escalate. Although symptom reduction by currently available pharmacological and/or surgical treatments improves the quality of life of many PD patients, there are no treatments that can slow down, halt, or reverse disease progression. Because the loss of a specific cell type, midbrain dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra, is the main cause of motor dysfunction in PD, it is considered a promising target for cell replacement therapy. Indeed, numerous preclinical and clinical studies using fetal cell transplantation have provided proof of concept that cell replacement therapy may be a viable therapeutic approach for PD. However, the use of human fetal cells remains fraught with controversy due to fundamental ethical, practical, and clinical limitations. Groundbreaking work on human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells, coupled with extensive basic research in the stem cell field offers promising potential for hPSC-based cell replacement to become a realistic treatment regimen for PD once several major issues can be successfully addressed. In this review, we will discuss the prospects and challenges of hPSC-based cell therapy for PD.

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The Supplementary Motor Complex in Parkinson’s Disease
Shervin Rahimpour, Shashank Rajkumar, Mark Hallett
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(1):21-32.   Published online November 25, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21075
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by both motor and nonmotor symptoms. Although the basal ganglia is traditionally the primary brain region implicated in this disease process, this limited view ignores the roles of the cortex and cerebellum that are networked with the basal ganglia to support motor and cognitive functions. In particular, recent research has highlighted dysfunction in the supplementary motor complex (SMC) in patients with PD. Using the PubMed and Google Scholar search engines, we identified research articles using keywords pertaining to the involvement of the SMC in action sequencing impairments, temporal processing disturbances, and gait impairment in patients with PD. A review of abstracts and full-text articles was used to identify relevant articles. In this review of 63 articles, we focus on the role of the SMC in PD, highlighting anatomical and functional data to create new perspectives in understanding clinical symptoms and, potentially, new therapeutic targets. The SMC has a nuanced role in the pathophysiology of PD, with both hypo- and hyperactivation associated with various symptoms. Further studies using more standardized patient populations and functional tasks are needed to more clearly elucidate the role of this region in the pathophysiology and treatment of PD.

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Subjective Cognitive Complaints in Cognitively Normal Patients With Parkinson’s Disease: A Systematic Review
Jin Yong Hong, Phil Hyu Lee
J Mov Disord. 2023;16(1):1-12.   Published online November 10, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22059
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Subjective cognitive complaints (SCCs) refer to self-perceived cognitive decline and are related to objective cognitive decline. SCCs in cognitively normal individuals are considered a preclinical sign of subsequent cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer’s disease, and SCCs in cognitively normal patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) are also gaining attention. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of the current research on SCCs in cognitively normal patients with PD. A systematic search found a lack of consistency in the methodologies used to define and measure SCCs. Although the association between SCCs and objective cognitive performance in cognitively normal patients with PD is controversial, SCCs appear to be predictive of subsequent cognitive decline. These findings support the clinical value of SCCs in cognitively normal status in PD; however, further convincing evidence from biomarker studies is needed to provide a pathophysiological basis for these findings. Additionally, a consensus on the definition and assessment of SCCs is needed for further investigations.

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Brief communication
Current Status of Telemedicine for Parkinson’s Disease in Japan: A Single-Center Cross-Sectional Questionnaire Survey
Mayuko Ogawa, Genko Oyama, Satoko Sekimoto, Taku Hatano, Nobutaka Hattori
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(1):58-61.   Published online December 24, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21096
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Using telemedicine is a way to improve the accessibility of specialists for patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD); however, it is not widely used in Japan. We investigated the efficacy of telemedicine in PD by using a single-center cross-sectional questionnaire survey.
Methods
We sent a questionnaire to patients who agreed to participate from among 52 patients with PD who had used telemedicine services at Juntendo University Hospital from October 2017 to November 2018. Caregivers were asked to respond to one question separately.
Results
A total of 38 patients responded to the questionnaire. Most patients were satisfied with the telemedicine consultation (7.8 ± 1.9), reporting that it was effective in reducing their travel burden. Twenty-one patients attended a telemedicine consultation with their caregivers, and their satisfaction was high (8.4 ± 1.8).
Conclusion
In a specific cohort in Japan, patients with PD and their caregivers were mostly satisfied with the telemedicine service.

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  • A Survey of Perspectives on Telemedicine for Patients With Parkinson’s Disease
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Original Article
Potential Link Between Cognition and Motor Reserve in Patients With Parkinson’s Disease
Seok Jong Chung, Yae Ji Kim, Yun Joong Kim, Hye Sun Lee, Mijin Yun, Phil Hyu Lee, Yong Jeong, Young H. Sohn
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(3):249-257.   Published online September 7, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22063
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
To investigate whether there is a link between cognitive function and motor reserve (i.e., individual capacity to cope with nigrostriatal dopamine depletion) in patients with newly diagnosed Parkinson’s disease (PD).
Methods
A total of 163 patients with drug-naïve PD who underwent 18F-FP-CIT PET, brain MRI, and a detailed neuropsychological test were enrolled. We estimated individual motor reserve based on initial motor deficits and striatal dopamine depletion using a residual model. We performed correlation analyses between motor reserve estimates and cognitive composite scores. Diffusion connectometry analysis was performed to map the white matter fiber tracts, of which fractional anisotropy (FA) values were well correlated with motor reserve estimates. Additionally, Cox regression analysis was used to assess the effect of initial motor reserve on the risk of dementia conversion.
Results
The motor reserve estimate was positively correlated with the composite score of the verbal memory function domain (γ = 0.246) and with the years of education (γ = 0.251). Connectometry analysis showed that FA values in the left fornix were positively correlated with the motor reserve estimate, while no fiber tracts were negatively correlated with the motor reserve estimate. Cox regression analysis demonstrated that higher motor reserve estimates tended to be associated with a lower risk of dementia conversion (hazard ratio, 0.781; 95% confidence interval, 0.576–1.058).
Conclusion
The present study demonstrated that the motor reserve estimate was well correlated with verbal memory function and with white matter integrity in the left fornix, suggesting a possible link between cognition and motor reserve in patients with PD.

Citations

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  • Hippocampal Perfusion Affects Motor and Cognitive Functions in Parkinson Disease: An Early Phase 18F‐FP‐CIT Positron Emission Tomography Study
    Min Young Chun, Seok Jong Chung, Su Hong Kim, Chan Wook Park, Seong Ho Jeong, Hye Sun Lee, Phil Hyu Lee, Young H. Sohn, Yong Jeong, Yun Joong Kim
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    Changhwan Sung, Seung Jun Oh, Jae Seung Kim
    Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.2024; 58(4): 185.     CrossRef
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Case Report
Effect of Chelation Therapy on a Korean Patient With Brain Manganese Deposition Resulting From a Compound Heterozygous Mutation in the SLC39A14 Gene
Jae-Hyeok Lee, Jin-Hong Shin
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(2):171-174.   Published online March 22, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21143
  • 3,236 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Mutations in the manganese transporter gene SLC39A14 lead to inherited disorders of manganese metabolism. Chelation therapy with edetate calcium disodium (CaNa2EDTA) is known to effectively reduce manganese deposition. We describe the first identified Korean case of SLC39A14-associated manganism and the treatment response to a 5-year chelation therapy. An 18-year-old female presented with childhood-onset dystonia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed T1 hyperintensity throughout the basal ganglia, brainstem, cerebellum, cerebral and cerebellar white matter, and pituitary gland. Blood manganese levels were elevated, and whole-exome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous mutations in SLC39A14. Treatment with intravenous CaNa2EDTA led to a significant reduction in serum manganese levels and T1 hyperintensities. However, her dystonia improved insignificantly. Hence, early diagnosis of this genetic disorder is essential because it is potentially treatable. Even though our treatment did not significantly reverse the establish deficits, chelation therapy could have been more effective if it was started at an earlier stage of the disease.

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  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Manganism: A Narrative Review and Laboratory Recommendations
    Michal Majewski, Karolina Piwko, Michal Ordak, Elzbieta Muszynska, Tadeusz Nasierowski, Magdalena Bujalska-Zadrozny
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Letter to the editor
Task-Specific Dystonia in a Professional Billiard Player
Hyukje Lee, Sang-Won Yoo, Joong-Seok Kim
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(1):86-88.   Published online September 8, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21055
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PDFSupplementary Material

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    Heryanto Nur Muhammad, Noortje Anita Kumaat, Nurkholis Nurkholis, Nur Ahmad Arief, Lutfhi Abdil Khuddus, Novadri Ayubi
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Viewpoint
Potential Benefits and Perils of Incorporating ChatGPT to the Movement Disorders Clinic
Andres Deik
J Mov Disord. 2023;16(2):158-162.   Published online May 24, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.23072
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PDF

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  • (How) ChatGPT—Artificial Intelligence Thinks It Can Help/Harm Physiatry
    Jakub Jačisko, Viktor Veselý, Ke-Vin Chang, Levent Özçakar
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    Hanjae Kim, Hee Min Jin, Yoon Bin Jung, Seng Chan You
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    Michael C Oca, Leo Meller, Katherine Wilson, Alomi O Parikh, Allison McCoy, Jessica Chang, Rasika Sudharshan, Shreya Gupta, Sandy Zhang-Nunes
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Original Article
The Effect of Blood Lipids, Type 2 Diabetes, and Body Mass Index on Parkinson’s Disease: A Korean Mendelian Randomization Study
Kye Won Park, Yun Su Hwang, Seung Hyun Lee, Sungyang Jo, Sun Ju Chung
J Mov Disord. 2023;16(1):79-85.   Published online January 12, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22175
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Associations between various metabolic conditions and Parkinson’s disease (PD) have been previously identified in epidemiological studies. We aimed to investigate the causal effect of lipid levels, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and body mass index (BMI) on PD in a Korean population via Mendelian randomization (MR).
Methods
Two-sample MR analyses were performed with inverse-variance weighted (IVW), weighted median, and MR-Egger regression approaches. We identified genetic variants associated with lipid concentrations, T2DM, and BMI in publicly available summary statistics, which were either collected from genome-wide association studies (GWASs) or from meta-analyses of GWAS that targeted only Korean individuals or East Asian individuals, including Korean individuals. The outcome dataset was a GWAS on PD performed in a Korean population.
Results
From previous GWASs and meta-analyses, we selected single nucleotide polymorphisms as the instrumental variables. Variants associated with serum levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides, as well as with T2DM and BMI, were selected (n = 11, 19, 17, 89, and 9, respectively). There were no statistically significant causal associations observed between the five exposures and PD using either the IVW, weighted median, or MR-Egger methods (p-values of the IVW method: 0.332, 0.610, 0.634, 0.275, and 0.860, respectively).
Conclusion
This study does not support a clinically relevant causal effect of lipid levels, T2DM, and BMI on PD risk in a Korean population.

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Brief communication
Validation of the Thai Version of the Movement Disorder Society-Sponsored Revision of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale
Priya Jagota, Prachaya Srivanitchapoom, Sitthi Petchrutchatachart, Surat Singmaneesakulchai, Apichart Pisarnpong, Praween Lolekha, Suwanna Setthawatcharawanich, Parnsiri Chairangsaris, Natlada Limotai, Pawut Mekawichai, Pattamon Panyakaew, Onanong Phokaewvarangkul, Jirada Sringean, Yuvadee Pitakpatapee, Nancy LaPelle, Pablo Martinez-Martin, Xuehan Ren, Sheng Luo, Glenn T. Stebbins, Christopher G. Goetz, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(2):151-155.   Published online March 16, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21104
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
This study aims to validate the Thai translation of the Movement Disorder Society-sponsored revision of the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS).
Methods
The English version was translated into Thai and then back-translated into English. The translated version underwent 2 rounds of cognitive pretesting to assess the ease of comprehension, ease of use and comfort with the scale. Then, it underwent large clinimetric testing.
Results
The Thai version was validated in 354 PD patients. The comparative fit index (CFI) for all four parts of the Thai version of the MDS-UPDRS was 0.93 or greater. Exploratory factor analysis identified isolated item differences in factor structure between the Thai and English versions.
Conclusion
The overall factor structure of the Thai version was consistent with that of the English version based on the high CFIs (all CFI ≥ 0.90). Hence, it can be designated the official Thai version of the MDS-UPDRS.

Citations

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    Clinical Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2024; 10: 100232.     CrossRef
  • Residual effects of combined vibratory and plantar stimulation while seated influences plantar pressure and spatiotemporal gait measures in individuals with Parkinson’s disease exhibiting freezing of gait
    Warongporn Phuenpathom, Pattamon Panyakaew, Peerapon Vateekul, Decho Surangsrirat, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
    Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • User-centred design, validation and clinical testing of an anti-choking mug for people with Parkinson’s disease
    Roongroj Bhidayasiri, Araya Chaisongkram, Chanawat Anan, Warongporn Phuenpathom
    Scientific Reports.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Sarah A. O'Shea, Ludy C. Shih
    Seminars in Neurology.2023; 43(01): 004.     CrossRef
  • Vibratory and plantar pressure stimulation: Steps to improve freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease
    Warongporn Phuenpathom, Pattamon Panyakaew, Peerapon Vateekul, Decho Surangsrirat, Akarin Hiransuthikul, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2022; 105: 43.     CrossRef

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