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Volume 4(2); October 2011
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Review Article
MicroRNAs in Experimental Models of Movement Disorders
Soon-Tae Lee, Manho Kim
J Mov Disord. 2011;4(2):55-59.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.11011
  • 27,260 View
  • 49 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs comprised of 20–25 nucleotides that regulates gene expression by inducing translational repression or degradation of target mRNA. The importance of miRNAs as a mediator of disease pathogenesis and therapeutic targets is rapidly emerging in neuroscience, as well as oncology, immunology, and cardiovascular diseases. In Parkinson’s disease and related disorders, multiple studies have identified the implications of specific miRNAs and the polymorphisms of miRNA target genes during the disease pathogenesis. With a focus on Parkinson’s disease, spinocerebellar ataxia, hereditary spastic paraplegia, and Huntington’s disease, this review summarizes and interprets the observations, and proposes future research topics in this field.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Rapid colorimetric analysis of multiple microRNAs using encoded hydrogel microparticles
    Ju Yeon Kim, Seok Joon Mun, Yoon Ho Roh, Ki Wan Bong
    The Analyst.2021; 146(18): 5508.     CrossRef
  • Depressive symptoms are associated with a functional polymorphism in a miR-433 binding site in the FGF20 gene
    Karen M. Jiménez, Angela J. Pereira-Morales, Ana Adan, Sandra Lopez-Leon, Diego A. Forero
    Molecular Brain.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • MiR-144 promotes β-amyloid accumulation-induced cognitive impairments by targeting ADAM10 following traumatic brain injury
    Liqian Sun, Manman Zhao, Jingbo Zhang, Aihua Liu, Wenjun Ji, Youxiang Li, Xinjian Yang, Zhongxue Wu
    Oncotarget.2017; 8(35): 59181.     CrossRef
  • Systematic literature review on Parkinson's disease and Childhood Leukaemia and mode of actions for pesticides
    Judy Choi, Alexandra Polcher, Anke Joas
    EFSA Supporting Publications.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Articles
Putaminal Hypointensity in the Parkinsonian Variant of Multiple System Atrophy: Simple Visual Assessment Using Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging
Jae-Hyeok Lee, Seung-Kug Baik
J Mov Disord. 2011;4(2):60-63.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.11012
  • 15,250 View
  • 181 Download
  • 16 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background and Purpose

Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) has been shown to be superior in its ability to demonstrate brain mineralization than other conventional MR imaging. The goal of our study was therefore to assess the frequency and extent of putaminal hypointensity in parkinsonian variant MSA using SWI.

Methods

11 patients with multiple system atrophy-parkinsonian type (MSA-p), 30 patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), and age matched 30 controls were investigated using 3 Tesla MRI. The pattern of putaminal hypointensity was measured using a visual grading scale and scored from 0 to 3.

Results

Hemi- or bilateral putaminal hypointensity (a score of ≥ 2) and hyperintense rim were recognized in 81.8% and 54.5% of 11 MSA-p, respectively. The scores of putaminal hypointensity of MSA-p were significantly higher than other groups (p < 0.001), a score of ≥ 2 differentiated MSA-p from other groups. And all five patients with early disease stage also showed these characteristic findings.

Conclusions

SWI appears to be useful for depicting putaminal hypointensity even in early stage of MSA-p. This finding suggests that iron deposition associated putaminal degeneration can occur early in the disease process.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Diagnostic performance of T2* gradient echo, susceptibility-weighted imaging, and quantitative susceptibility mapping for patients with multiple system atrophy–parkinsonian type: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Su Jin Lim, Chong Hyun Suh, Woo Hyun Shim, Sang Joon Kim
    European Radiology.2022; 32(1): 308.     CrossRef
  • The utility of susceptibility-weighted imaging in the diagnosis of multiple system atrophy, cerebellar type
    Halil Onder
    Journal of Medical Sciences.2022; 42(1): 53.     CrossRef
  • An Updated Overview of the Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Brain Iron in Movement Disorders
    Nicola Tambasco, Pasquale Nigro, Andrea Chiappiniello, Federico Paolini Paoletti, Sara Scialpi, Simone Simoni, Pietro Chiarini, Lucilla Parnetti, Barbara Picconi
    Behavioural Neurology.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
  • Automated Differentiation of Atypical Parkinsonian Syndromes Using Brain Iron Patterns in Susceptibility Weighted Imaging
    Yun Soo Kim, Jae-Hyeok Lee, Jin Kyu Gahm
    Diagnostics.2022; 12(3): 637.     CrossRef
  • The “Black Straight-Line Sign” in the Putamen in Diffusion-Weighted Imaging: A Potential Diagnostic MRI Marker for Multiple System Atrophy
    Yiming Zheng, Xiwen Wang, Huajian Zhao, Yanyan Jiang, Ying Zhu, Jing Chen, Wei Sun, Zhaoxia Wang, Yunchuang Sun
    Frontiers in Neurology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Role of zinc transporter ZIP12 in susceptibility‐weighted brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) phenotypes and mitochondrial function
    Morgan D. Strong, Matthew D. Hart, Tony Z. Tang, Babajide A. Ojo, Lei Wu, Mariah R. Nacke, Workneh T. Agidew, Hong J. Hwang, Peter R. Hoyt, Ahmed Bettaieb, Stephen L. Clarke, Brenda J. Smith, Barbara J. Stoecker, Edralin A. Lucas, Dingbo Lin, Winyoo Chowa
    The FASEB Journal.2020; 34(9): 10702.     CrossRef
  • Current Management and Emerging Therapies in Multiple System Atrophy
    Matthew R. Burns, Nikolaus R. McFarland
    Neurotherapeutics.2020; 17(4): 1582.     CrossRef
  • Morphology and signal changes of the lentiform nucleus based on susceptibility weighted imaging in parkinsonism-predominant multiple system atrophy
    Qingguo Ren, Xiangshui Meng, Bin Zhang, Jianyuan Zhang, Xinyan Shuai, Xiaomin Nan, Cuiping Zhao
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2020; 81: 194.     CrossRef
  • Abnormalities on structural MRI associate with faster disease progression in multiple system atrophy
    Florian Krismer, Klaus Seppi, Gregor K. Wenning, Spyridon Papapetropoulos, Victor Abler, Georg Goebel, Michael Schocke, Werner Poewe
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2019; 58: 23.     CrossRef
  • Brain Iron Accumulation in Atypical Parkinsonian Syndromes: in vivo MRI Evidences for Distinctive Patterns
    Jae-Hyeok Lee, Myung-Sik Lee
    Frontiers in Neurology.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Quantitative Validation of a Visual Rating Scale for Defining High-Iron Putamen in Patients With Multiple System Atrophy
    Myung Jun Lee, Tae-Hyung Kim, Seung Joo Kim, Baik-Kyun Kim, Chi-Woong Mun, Jae-Hyeok Lee
    Frontiers in Neurology.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Looking Deep into the Eye-of-the-Tiger in Pantothenate Kinase–Associated Neurodegeneration
    J.-H. Lee, A. Gregory, P. Hogarth, C. Rogers, S.J. Hayflick
    American Journal of Neuroradiology.2018; 39(3): 583.     CrossRef
  • The Relevance of Iron in the Pathogenesis of Multiple System Atrophy: A Viewpoint
    Christine Kaindlstorfer, Kurt A. Jellinger, Sabine Eschlböck, Nadia Stefanova, Günter Weiss, Gregor K. Wenning
    Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.2018; 61(4): 1253.     CrossRef
  • Using ‘swallow-tail’ sign and putaminal hypointensity as biomarkers to distinguish multiple system atrophy from idiopathic Parkinson’s disease: A susceptibility-weighted imaging study
    Na Wang, HuaGuang Yang, ChengBo Li, GuoGuang Fan, XiaoGuang Luo
    European Radiology.2017; 27(8): 3174.     CrossRef
  • Magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease
    Beatrice Heim, Florian Krismer, Roberto De Marzi, Klaus Seppi
    Journal of Neural Transmission.2017; 124(8): 915.     CrossRef
  • Utility of susceptibility-weighted imaging in Parkinson’s disease and atypical Parkinsonian disorders
    Zhibin Wang, Xiao-Guang Luo, Chao Gao
    Translational Neurodegeneration.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
Lateralized Effects of Unilateral Thalamotomy and Thalamic Stimulation in Patients with Essential Tremor
Mi J. Kim, Sang R. Jeon, Sung R. Kim, Myoung C. Lee, Sun J. Chung
J Mov Disord. 2011;4(2):64-67.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.11013
  • 14,819 View
  • 69 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background and Purpose

Stereotactic thalamotomy has been an effective surgical procedure in the treatment of medically refractory essential tremor (ET), however, little is known about the bilateral effects of unilateral ventralis intermedius (Vim) thalamotomy and Vim deep brain stimulation (DBS). We studied the lateralized effects of unilateral Vim thalamotomy and Vim DBS in ET patients.

Methods

Vim thalamotomy was performed in 6 patients and Vim DBS in 6. Patients were evaluated preoperatively and at 3 and 6 months postoperatively using the Clinical Rating Scale for Tremor (CRST).

Results

The contralateral Part A (tremor localization/severity rating) and Part B (specific motor tasks/function rating) subscores, and axial subscores of CRST significantly improved after unilateral Vim thalamotomy or Vim DBS. On the side ipsilateral to surgery, ET patients demonstrated no significant improvements in the Part A and Part B subscores of CRST. The Part C (functional disabilities resulting from tremor) subscores and total scores of CRST were significantly improved after surgery.

Conclusions

Vim thalamotomy and DBS may be equally effective for the management of contralateral and axial tremor in ET patients, but both interventions may not improve tremor on the side ipsilateral to surgery.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Deep Brain Stimulation for Tremor: Update on Long-Term Outcomes, Target Considerations and Future Directions
    Naomi I. Kremer, Rik W. J. Pauwels, Nicolò G. Pozzi, Florian Lange, Jonas Roothans, Jens Volkmann, Martin M. Reich
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2021; 10(16): 3468.     CrossRef
  • Clinical improvement associated with targeted interruption of the cerebellothalamic tract following MR-guided focused ultrasound for essential tremor
    J. Levi Chazen, Harini Sarva, Philip E. Stieg, Robert J. Min, Douglas J. Ballon, Kane O. Pryor, Paul M. Riegelhaupt, Michael G. Kaplitt
    Journal of Neurosurgery.2018; 129(2): 315.     CrossRef
  • Innovations in Functional Neurosurgery and Anesthetic Implications
    Lauren K. Dunn, Marcel E. Durieux, W. Jeffrey Elias, Edward C. Nemergut, Bhiken I. Naik
    Journal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology.2018; 30(1): 18.     CrossRef
  • Surgical treatments for essential tremor
    Rodger J. Elble, Ludy Shih, Jeffrey W. Cozzens
    Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics.2018; 18(4): 303.     CrossRef
  • The Current Status of Deep Brain Stimulation for the Treatment of Parkinson Disease in the Republic of Korea
    Jung-Il Lee
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2015; 8(3): 115.     CrossRef
Analysis of the Substantia Innominata Volume in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease with Dementia, Dementia with Lewy Bodies, and Alzheimer’s Disease
Hee Jin Kim, Ji Eun Lee, Soo Jeong Shin, Young Ho Sohn, Phil Hyu Lee
J Mov Disord. 2011;4(2):68-72.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.11014
  • 11,654 View
  • 76 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background and Purpose

The substantia innominata (SI) contains the nucleus basalis of Meynert, which is the major source of cholinergic input to the cerebral cortex. We hypothesized that degeneration of the SI and its relationship to general cognitive performance differs in amyloidopathy and synucleinopathy.

Methods

We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based volumetric analysis to evaluate the SI volume in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease-mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI), PD with dementia (PDD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and healthy elderly controls. The correlation between SI volume and general cognitive performance, measured using the Korean version of the Mini-Mental State Examination (K-MMSE), was examined.

Results

Compared to control subjects, the mean normalized SI volume was significantly decreased in all of the other groups. The normalized SI volume did not differ between the subjects with PDD and DLB, whereas it was significantly smaller in subjects with PDD (p = 0.029) and DLB (p = 0.011) compared with AD. In subjects with PD-related cognitive impairment (PD-MCI, PDD, or DLB), there was a significant positive correlation between the SI volume and K-MMSE score (r = 0.366, p < 0.001), whereas no correlation was seen in subjects with AD-related cognitive impairment (aMCI or AD).

Conclusions

Our data suggest that the SI loss is greater in synucleinopathy-related dementia (PDD or DLB) than in AD and that the contribution of the SI to cognitive performance is greater in synucleinopathy than in amyloidopathy.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Manual and automated analysis of atrophy patterns in dementia with Lewy bodies on MRI
    Eya Khadhraoui, Sebastian Johannes Müller, Niels Hansen, Christian Heiner Riedel, Philip Langer, Charles Timäeus, Jens Wiltfang, Caroline Bouter, Claudia Lange, Marielle Ernst
    BMC Neurology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Cholinergic white matter pathways in dementia with Lewy bodies and Alzheimer’s disease
    Julia Schumacher, Nicola J Ray, Calum A Hamilton, Paul C Donaghy, Michael Firbank, Gemma Roberts, Louise Allan, Rory Durcan, Nicola Barnett, John T O’Brien, John-Paul Taylor, Alan J Thomas
    Brain.2022; 145(5): 1773.     CrossRef
  • Metric magnetic resonance imaging analysis reveals pronounced substantia-innominata atrophy in dementia with Lewy bodies with a psychiatric onset
    Niels Hansen, Sebastian Johannes Müller, Eya Khadhraoui, Christian Heiner Riedel, Philip Langer, Jens Wiltfang, Charles-Arnold Timäus, Caroline Bouter, Marielle Ernst, Claudia Lange
    Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • In vivo nucleus basalis of Meynert degeneration in mild cognitive impairment with Lewy bodies
    Julia Schumacher, John-Paul Taylor, Calum A. Hamilton, Michael Firbank, Ruth A. Cromarty, Paul C. Donaghy, Gemma Roberts, Louise Allan, Jim Lloyd, Rory Durcan, Nicola Barnett, John T. O'Brien, Alan J. Thomas
    NeuroImage: Clinical.2021; 30: 102604.     CrossRef
  • EEG alpha reactivity and cholinergic system integrity in Lewy body dementia and Alzheimer’s disease
    Julia Schumacher, Alan J. Thomas, Luis R. Peraza, Michael Firbank, Ruth Cromarty, Calum A. Hamilton, Paul C. Donaghy, John T. O’Brien, John-Paul Taylor
    Alzheimer's Research & Therapy.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Transcriptional network analysis in frontal cortex in Lewy body diseases with focus on dementia with Lewy bodies
    Gabriel Santpere, Paula Garcia-Esparcia, Pol Andres-Benito, Belen Lorente-Galdos, Arcadi Navarro, Isidro Ferrer
    Brain Pathology.2018; 28(3): 315.     CrossRef
  • Nucleus Basalis of Meynert Stimulation for Dementia: Theoretical and Technical Considerations
    Deepak Kumbhare, Viktoras Palys, Jamie Toms, Chathurika S. Wickramasinghe, Kasun Amarasinghe, Milos Manic, Evan Hughes, Kathryn L. Holloway
    Frontiers in Neuroscience.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Dementia with Lewy Bodies: Molecular Pathology in the Frontal Cortex in Typical and Rapidly Progressive Forms
    Paula Garcia-Esparcia, Irene López-González, Oriol Grau-Rivera, María Francisca García-Garrido, Anusha Konetti, Franc Llorens, Saima Zafar, Margarita Carmona, José Antonio del Rio, Inga Zerr, Ellen Gelpi, Isidro Ferrer
    Frontiers in Neurology.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Biomarkers for dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease
    Manuel Delgado-Alvarado, Belén Gago, Irene Navalpotro-Gomez, Haritz Jiménez-Urbieta, María C. Rodriguez-Oroz
    Movement Disorders.2016; 31(6): 861.     CrossRef
  • Nucleus basalis of Meynert revisited: anatomy, history and differential involvement in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease
    Alan King Lun Liu, Raymond Chuen-Chung Chang, Ronald K. B. Pearce, Steve M. Gentleman
    Acta Neuropathologica.2015; 129(4): 527.     CrossRef
Case Reports
Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome in a Patient with Corticobasal Degeneration
Myung Jun Lee, Chul Hyoung Lyoo, Myung Sik Lee
J Mov Disord. 2011;4(2):73-74.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.11015
  • 9,281 View
  • 50 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF

Parkinson’s disease is a principal underlying disease of neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) occurring in parkinsonian disorders, but NMS may occur in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy and multiple system atrophy. We report first patient with corticobasal degeneration (CBD) who developed NMS after abrupt reduction of antiparkinsonian medication and concurrent infection. It should be kept in mind that the prevention of infectious illness, which is common complication in parkinson-plus syndrome, is important, and dose reduction or withdrawal of anti-parkinsonian medications should be carefully performed even in the patients with CBD who are expected to be unresponsive to levodopa treatment.

Oromandibular Dyskinesia as the Initial Manifestation of Late-Onset Huntington Disease
Dong-Seok Oh, Eun-Seon Park, Seong-Min Choi, Byeong-Chae Kim, Myeong-Kyu Kim, Ki-Hyun Cho
J Mov Disord. 2011;4(2):75-77.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.11016
  • 60,851 View
  • 61 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a triad of choreoathetosis, dementia and dominant inheritance. The cause of HD is an expansion of CAG trinucleotide repeats in the HD gene. Typical age at onset of symptoms is in the 40s, but the disorder can manifest at any time. Late-onset (≥ 60 years) HD is clinically different from other adult or juvenile onset HD and characterized by mild motor problem as the initial symptoms, shorter disease duration, frequent lack of family history, and relatively low CAG repeats expansion. We report a case of an 80-year-old female with oromandibular dyskinesia as an initial manifestation of HD and 40 CAG repeats.

Citations

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  • Harmine prevents 3-nitropropionic acid-induced neurotoxicity in rats via enhancing NRF2-mediated signaling: Involvement of p21 and AMPK
    Mohamed Z. Habib, Mariane G. Tadros, Hadwa A. Abd-Alkhalek, Magda I. Mohamad, Dalia M. Eid, Fatma E. Hassan, Hend Elhelaly, Yasser el Faramawy, Sawsan Aboul-Fotouh
    European Journal of Pharmacology.2022; 927: 175046.     CrossRef
  • Orofacial Dyskinesia and Intractable Hiccups in a Patient with Varicella-Zoster Virus Encephalomyelitis
    Akito Funatsu, Yohei Yamamoto, Midori Araki, Fumitoshi Aga, Hideki Mine
    Internal Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Management of Traumatic Ulcerations of Lips in a Case of Huntington’s Disease: A Novel Application of Essix Retainer
    Mohamed Iqbal J
    Journal of Indian Orthodontic Society.2021; 55(4): 415.     CrossRef
  • The oral manifestations of Huntington's disease: A systematic review of prevalence
    Luciana Munhoz, Ashjan Qasim Jabbar, William José e Silva Filho, Aline Yukari Nagai, Emiko Saito Arita
    Oral Diseases.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Concomitant Appearance of Pisa Syndrome and Striatal Hand in Parkinson’s Disease
Sanjay Pandey, Manmohan Mehndiratta
J Mov Disord. 2011;4(2):78-79.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.11017
  • 17,901 View
  • 68 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Pisa syndrome is (PS) usually seen in patients receiving antipsychotic drugs and characterised by lateral flexion of trunk and axial dystonia. It is believed that antipsychotic drugs lead to dopamine blockage causing PS. We describe a Parkinson’s disease patient who was doing well with levodopa/carbidopa for 3 years and developed lateral flexion of trunk. His abnormal posture used to completely improve upon lying down position. He also had striatal hand deformity suggestive of focal dystonia.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Pisa syndrome in dementia with Lewy bodies: A Chinese multicenter study
    Zhou Su, Shuai Liu, Gang Chen, Jinghuan Gan, Xinran Bao, Hongcan Zhu, Xiaodan Wang, Hao Wu, Yong Ji
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2022; 103: 50.     CrossRef
  • Striatal hand in an elderly man with disseminated tuberculosis: An unusual first case
    Rohit Gaude, Upinder Kaur, Ishan Kumar, Deepak K Gautam, Indrajeet S Gambhir, Sankha S Chakrabarti
    Geriatrics & Gerontology International.2018; 18(8): 1300.     CrossRef
  • Frequency and clinical correlates of postural and striatal deformities in Parkinson’s disease
    Amin Cervantes-Arriaga, Mayela Rodríguez-Violante, Hugo Morales-Briceño, Gabriel Neri-Nani, Roxanna Millán-Cepeda, Salvador Velázquez-Osuna
    Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery.2016; 142: 140.     CrossRef
  • Pisa syndrome in Parkinson's disease: An integrated approach from pathophysiology to management
    Michele Tinazzi, Christian Geroin, Marialuisa Gandolfi, Nicola Smania, Stefano Tamburin, Francesca Morgante, Alfonso Fasano
    Movement Disorders.2016; 31(12): 1785.     CrossRef
  • Reversible Parkinsonism and Pisa Syndrome in Juvenile Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus
    Sanjay Pandey
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice.2015; 2(1): 72.     CrossRef
Vocal Polyps in Tourette Syndrome
Michael P Chu, Karen PM Chu, Kevin Fung
J Mov Disord. 2011;4(2):80-81.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.11018
  • 6,676 View
  • 30 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Hoarseness and dysphonia are often a result of vocal cord polyps which in turn, are linked to vocal trauma. We report the case of vocal polyps in the setting of a 27-year old male with a history only remarkable for Tourette syndrome. We review the literature regarding etiology and pathophysiology of vocal cord lesions and propose vocal tics in Tourette syndrome as an under-recognized etiology. In this way, we also review therapies that may aid in treating not only the vocal cord lesions but also particularly in the setting of vocal tics.

Citations

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  • DISTRIBUTION OF BENIGN LARYNGEAL TUMORS IN CORRELATION WITH DURATION OF CIGARETTE SMOKING
    Slaviša Radosavljević, Miško Živić, Marija Conić-Miletić, Biljana Kostić-Inić
    Acta Medica Medianae.2017; 56(2): 13.     CrossRef
Dopa Responsive Slow Orthostatic Tremor in Parkinson’s Disease
Suk Yoon Lee, Eun Joo Chung, Yeo Jung Kim, Sang Jin Kim
J Mov Disord. 2011;4(2):82-84.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.11019
  • 14,271 View
  • 83 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Slow orthostatic tremor (OT) occurred to longer and lower frequency regular rhythmic bursts in leg muscle upon standing. The slow OT was often able to clinically confused with orthostatic myoclonus. We described a Parkinson’s disease patient with levodopa responsive slow OT. She showed abnormal movements of more regular rhythms and stable frequency on both legs on standing. These symptoms were aggravated at off state and improved by increasing levodopa.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Orthostatic myoclonus – A retrospective study of Asian patients
    Yi-Cheng Tai, Hung-Chang Kuo, Yihui Wu, Shih-Pin Hsu
    Journal of the Formosan Medical Association.2022; 121(7): 1310.     CrossRef
  • Therapeutic Devices for Motor Symptoms in Parkinson’s Disease: Current Progress and a Systematic Review of Recent Randomized Controlled Trials
    Joji Fujikawa, Ryoma Morigaki, Nobuaki Yamamoto, Teruo Oda, Hiroshi Nakanishi, Yuishin Izumi, Yasushi Takagi
    Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Unilateral Pseudo-Orthostatic Tremor Provoked by a Remote Limb Movement in Parkinson’s Disease
    Sang-Won Yoo, Youngje Heo, Joong-Seok Kim, Kwang-Soo Lee
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2020; 13(1): 69.     CrossRef
  • Levodopa-Responsive Primary Slow Orthostatic Tremor: A Premotor Sign of Parkinson’s Disease?
    Fumihito Yoshii, Wakoh Takahashi, Koji Aono
    Case Reports in Neurology.2020; 12(1): 1.     CrossRef

JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders