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Original Articles
The Non-Motor Symptom Profile of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy
Sudhakar Pushpa Chaithra, Shweta Prasad, Vikram Venkappayya Holla, Albert Stezin, Nitish Kamble, Ravi Yadav, Pramod Kumar Pal
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(2):118-126.   Published online April 6, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.19066
  • 5,528 View
  • 224 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Non-motor symptoms (NMSs) significantly contribute to increased morbidity and poor quality of life in patients with parkinsonian disorders. This study aims to explore the profile of NMSs in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) using the validated Non-Motor Symptom Scale (NMSS).
Methods
Seventy-six patients with PSP were evaluated in this study. Motor symptoms and NMSs were evaluated using the PSP Rating Scale (PSPRS), Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale-III, Montreal Cognitive Assessment, Hamilton Depression (HAMD) and Anxiety Rating Scales, Parkinson’s Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS) and NMSS. NMS severity and prevalence were also compared between patients with PSP-Richardson syndrome (PSP-RS) and those with PSP-parkinsonism.
Results
All subjects in this cohort reported at least 2 NMSs. The most prevalent NMSs in patients with PSP were in the domains of sleep/fatigue, mood/cognition, and sexual function. The least prevalent NMSs were in the domains of cardiovascular including falls, and perceptual problems/hallucinations. Significant correlations were observed between the NMSS scores and HAM-D, PDSS, PSPRS scores and PSPRS sub-scores. The severity of NMSs was unrelated to the duration of illness. Patients with PSP-RS reported a higher severity of drooling, altered smell/taste, depression and altered interest in sex and a higher prevalence of sexual dysfunction.
Conclusion
NMSs are commonly observed in patients with PSP, and the domains of sleep, mood and sexual function are most commonly affected. These symptoms contribute significantly to disease morbidity, and clinicians should pay adequate attention to identifying and addressing these symptoms.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A Systematic Review of Apathy and Depression in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy
    Joshua Flavell, Peter J. Nestor
    Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology.2022; 35(3): 280.     CrossRef
  • The Burden of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy on Patients, Caregivers, and Healthcare Systems by PSP Phenotype: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Demetris Pillas, Alexander Klein, Teresa Gasalla, Andreja Avbersek, Alexander Thompson, Jack Wright, Jennifer Mellor, Anna Scowcroft
    Frontiers in Neurology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Autonomic dysfunction in progressive supranuclear palsy
    Francesca Baschieri, Maria Vitiello, Pietro Cortelli, Giovanna Calandra-Buonaura, Francesca Morgante
    Journal of Neurology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Fatigue in hypokinetic, hyperkinetic, and functional movement disorders
    Ilaria Antonella Di Vico, Giovanni Cirillo, Alessandro Tessitore, Mattia Siciliano, Massimo Venturelli, Cristian Falup-Pecurariu, Gioacchino Tedeschi, Francesca Morgante, Michele Tinazzi
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2021; 86: 114.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and Characteristics of Polyneuropathy in Atypical Parkinsonian Syndromes: An Explorative Study
    Rachel Rohmann, Eva Kühn, Raphael Scherbaum, Lovis Hilker, Saskia Kools, Leonard Scholz, Katharina Müller, Sophie Huckemann, Christiane Schneider-Gold, Ralf Gold, Kalliopi Pitarokoili, Lars Tönges, Eun Hae Kwon
    Brain Sciences.2021; 11(7): 879.     CrossRef
  • Understanding fatigue in progressive supranuclear palsy
    Jong Hyeon Ahn, Joomee Song, Dong Yeong Lee, Jinyoung Youn, Jin Whan Cho
    Scientific Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • “Parkinson’s disease” on the way to progressive supranuclear palsy: a review on PSP-parkinsonism
    Ján Necpál, Miroslav Borsek, Bibiána Jeleňová
    Neurological Sciences.2021; 42(12): 4927.     CrossRef
  • Clinical progression of progressive supranuclear palsy: impact of trials bias and phenotype variants
    Duncan Street, Maura Malpetti, Timothy Rittman, Boyd C P Ghosh, Alexander G Murley, Ian Coyle-Gilchrist, Luca Passamonti, James B Rowe
    Brain Communications.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Sleepiness and Depression in Parkinson’s Disease Patients Treated with Ropinirole and Levodopa
Suk Yun Kang, Ho-Sung Ryu, Mun-Kyung Sunwoo, Sang-Jin Kim, Jong-Sam Baik, Mee-Young Park, Hyung-Eun Park, Joong-Seok Kim, Kyum-Yil Kwon, Seong-Beom Koh, Young-Eun Kim, Mi-Kyong Lee, Jong-Min Kim, Sun Ju Chung, Young-Ho Sohn
J Mov Disord. 2017;10(3):123-129.   Published online September 22, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.17048
  • 6,573 View
  • 183 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
We aimed to investigate the effect of ropinirole on excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and depression in Parkinson’s disease (PD) with a large population.
Methods
We conducted a cross-sectional observational study at nine hospitals in Korea between April 24, 2013, and April 22, 2015. We analyzed the demographic and clinical features, other medical history, history of antiparkinsonian medication within 6 months, Hoehn and Yahr stage (HY stage), Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part II and III, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and 30-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-30).
Results
Four-hundred-thirteen patients with PD (mean age: 65.2 ± 9.0 years; men: 227 patients) were analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that age at examination, UPDRS II, and GDS-30 were independent risk factors for EDS and that sex, UPDRS II, and ESS were independent risk factors for depression.
Conclusion
Our large group study did not find any significant associations of ropinirole with EDS and depression in Korean PD patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Excessive daytime sleepiness in Parkinson's disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Fei Feng, YingYing Cai, YanBing Hou, Ruwei Ou, Zheng Jiang, HuiFang Shang
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2021; 85: 133.     CrossRef
  • Sleep Disorders and Cognitive Dysfunctions in Parkinson’s Disease: A Meta-Analytic Study
    Gianpaolo Maggi, Luigi Trojano, Paolo Barone, Gabriella Santangelo
    Neuropsychology Review.2021; 31(4): 643.     CrossRef
  • Longitudinal risk factors for developing depressive symptoms in Parkinson's disease
    Tarek Antar, Huw R. Morris, Faraz Faghri, Hampton L. Leonard, Mike A. Nalls, Andrew B. Singleton, Hirotaka Iwaki
    Journal of the Neurological Sciences.2021; 429: 117615.     CrossRef
  • The effect and safety of ropinirole in the treatment of Parkinson disease
    Jiali Zhu, Min Chen
    Medicine.2021; 100(46): e27653.     CrossRef
  • Pramipexole regulates depression-like behavior via dopamine D3 receptor in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease
    Shi-Zhuang Wei, Xiao-Yu Yao, Chen-Tao Wang, An-Qi Dong, Dan Li, Yu-Ting Zhang, Chao Ren, Jin-Bao Zhang, Cheng-Jie Mao, Fen Wang, Chun-Feng Liu
    Brain Research Bulletin.2021; 177: 363.     CrossRef
  • A selective D2 dopamine receptor agonist alleviates depression through up-regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase and increased neurogenesis in hippocampus of the prenatally stressed rats
    Mahino Fatima, Mir Hilal Ahmad, Saurabh Srivastav, Moshahid Alam Rizvi, A.C. Mondal
    Neurochemistry International.2020; 136: 104730.     CrossRef
  • ‘Dopamine agonist Phobia’ in Parkinson’s disease: when does it matter? Implications for non-motor symptoms and personalized medicine
    Silvia Rota, Iro Boura, Lucia Batzu, Nataliya Titova, Peter Jenner, Cristian Falup-Pecurariu, K Ray Chaudhuri
    Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics.2020; 20(9): 953.     CrossRef
  • An Investigation on the Clinical Features and Neurochemical Changes in Parkinson's Disease With Depression
    Teng-Hong Lian, Peng Guo, Li-Jun Zuo, Yang Hu, Shu-Yang Yu, Li Liu, Zhao Jin, Qiu-Jin Yu, Rui-Dan Wang, Li-Xia Li, Ying-Shan Piao, Wei Zhang
    Frontiers in Psychiatry.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
Case Report
Hypomania Induced by Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation in a Parkinson’s Disease Patient: Does It Suggest a Dysfunction of the Limbic Circuit?
Ji Seon Kim, Hee Jin Kim, Ji-Young Lee, Jong Min Kim, Ji Young Yun, Beom S. Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2012;5(1):14-17.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.12004
  • 11,647 View
  • 62 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

The aim of this report was to describe a case of hypomania after deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) in a Parkinson’s disease (PD) patient. 59-year-old man with a 15-year history of PD underwent bilateral implantation of electrodes to the STN. Immediately after surgery, his motor function was markedly improved and his mood was elevated to hypomania. Fusion images of the preoperative MRI and postoperative CT scan showed that the electrodes were located in the medial portion of the STN. In this case, behavioral mood change was related to the deep brain stimulation. Moreover, the anatomical location and the functional alteration of the STN after the DBS surgery might be related to the regulatory system of the associative and limbic cortico-subcortical circuits.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The anatomo-functional organization of the hyperdirect cortical pathway to the subthalamic area using in vivo structural connectivity imaging in humans
    Gizem Temiz, Sophie B. Sébille, Chantal Francois, Eric Bardinet, Carine Karachi
    Brain Structure and Function.2020; 225(2): 551.     CrossRef
  • Hypomania and saccadic changes in Parkinson’s disease: influence of D2 and D3 dopaminergic signalling
    Esther A. Pelzer, Barbara Dillenburger, Sophie Grundmann, Vladimir Iliaev, Sophie Aschenberg, Corina Melzer, Martin Hess, Gereon R. Fink, Carsten Eggers, Marc Tittgemeyer, Lars Timmermann
    npj Parkinson's Disease.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Overlapping and distinct neural metabolic patterns related to impulsivity and hypomania in Parkinson’s disease
    Frank Schwartz, Masoud Tahmasian, Franziska Maier, Luisa Rochhausen, Kim L. Schnorrenberg, Fateme Samea, Joseph Seemiller, Mojtaba Zarei, Christian Sorg, Alexander Drzezga, Lars Timmermann, Thomas D. Meyer, Thilo van Eimeren, Carsten Eggers
    Brain Imaging and Behavior.2019; 13(1): 241.     CrossRef
  • Affective modulation of the associative-limbic subthalamic nucleus: deep brain stimulation in obsessive–compulsive disorder
    Mircea Polosan, Fabien Droux, Astrid Kibleur, Stephan Chabardes, Thierry Bougerol, Olivier David, Paul Krack, Valerie Voon
    Translational Psychiatry.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Beyond Emotions: Oscillations of the Amygdala and Their Implications for Electrical Neuromodulation
    Lisa-Maria Schönfeld, Lars Wojtecki
    Frontiers in Neuroscience.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef

JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders