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Original Articles
Fasting Plasma Glucose Levels and Longitudinal Motor and Cognitive Outcomes in Parkinson’s Disease Patients
Ko-Eun Choi, Dong-Woo Ryu, Yoon-Sang Oh, Joong-Seok Kim
J Mov Disord. 2024;17(2):198-207.   Published online March 6, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.23264
  • 952 View
  • 42 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Hyperglycemia and diabetes mellitus have been identified as poor prognostic factors for motor and nonmotor outcomes in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), although there is some controversy with this finding. In the present study, we investigated the effects of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels on longitudinal motor and cognitive outcomes in PD patients.
Methods
We included a total of 201 patients who were diagnosed with PD between January 2015 and January 2020. The patients were categorized based on FPG level into euglycemia (70 mg/dL < FPG < 100 mg/dL), intermediate glycemia (100 mg/dL ≤ FPG < 126 mg/dL), and hyperglycemia (FPG ≥ 126 mg/dL), and longitudinal FPG trajectories were analyzed using group-based trajectory modeling. Survival analysis was conducted to determine the time until motor outcome (Hoehn and Yahr stage ≥ 2) and the conversion from normal cognition to mild cognitive impairment.
Results
Among the patient cohort, 82 had euglycemia, 93 had intermediate glycemia, and 26 had hyperglycemia. Intermediate glycemia (hazard ratio 1.747, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.083–2.816, p = 0.0221) and hyperglycemia (hazard ratio 3.864, 95% CI 1.996–7.481, p < 0.0001) were found to be significant predictors of worsening motor symptoms. However, neither intermediate glycemia (hazard ratio 1.183, 95% CI 0.697–2.009, p = 0.5339) nor hyperglycemia (hazard ratio 1.297, 95% CI 0.601–2.800, p = 0.5078) demonstrated associations with the longitudinal progression of cognitive impairment. Diabetes mellitus, defined by self-reported medical history, was not related to poor motor or cognitive impairment outcomes.
Conclusion
Our results suggest that both impaired glucose tolerance and hyperglycemia could be associated with motor progression in PD patients.
Effectiveness of Live-Streaming Tele-Exercise Intervention in Patients With Parkinson’s Disease: A Pilot Study
Jongmok Ha, Jung Hyun Park, Jun Seok Lee, Hye Young Kim, Ji One Song, Jiwon Yoo, Jong Hyeon Ahn, Jinyoung Youn, Jin Whan Cho
J Mov Disord. 2024;17(2):189-197.   Published online February 29, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.23251
  • 1,307 View
  • 89 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Exercise can improve both motor and nonmotor symptoms in people with Parkinson’s disease (PwP), but there is an unmet need for accessible and sustainable exercise options. This study aimed to evaluate the effect, feasibility, and safety of a regularly performed live-streaming tele-exercise intervention for PwP.
Methods
A live-streaming exercise intervention for PwP was implemented twice a week for 12 weeks. We measured the motor and nonmotor symptom scores of the included patients before and after the intervention. Changes in clinical scores from baseline to postintervention were analyzed using paired t-tests. Factors associated with improvements in clinical scores and compliance were analyzed using Pearson’s correlation analysis.
Results
Fifty-six participants were enrolled in the study. There were significant improvements in Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS)-anxiety (p = 0.007), HADS-depression (p < 0.001), Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part III (p < 0.001), UPDRS total (p = 0.015), Hoehn and Yahr stage (p = 0.027), and Parkinson’s Disease Fatigue Scale-16 (p = 0.026) scores after the intervention. Improvements in motor symptoms were associated with improvements in mood symptoms and fatigue. Higher motor impairment at baseline was associated with a greater compliance rate and better postintervention composite motor and nonmotor outcomes (ΔUPDRS total score). Overall, the 12-week tele-exercise program was feasible and safe for PwP. No adverse events were reported. The overall adherence rate was 60.0% in our cohort, and 83.4% of the participants were able to participate in more than half of the exercise routines.
Conclusion
The live-streaming tele-exercise intervention is a safe, feasible, and effective nonpharmacological treatment option that can alleviate fatigue and improve mood and motor symptoms in PwP.
Review Article
Gastrointestinal Dysfunction in Parkinson’s Disease: Neuro-Gastroenterology Perspectives on a Multifaceted Problem
Ai Huey Tan, Kee Huat Chuah, Yuan Ye Beh, Jie Ping Schee, Sanjiv Mahadeva, Shen-Yang Lim
J Mov Disord. 2023;16(2):138-151.   Published online May 24, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22220
  • 3,133 View
  • 209 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) face a multitude of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, including nausea, bloating, reduced bowel movements, and difficulties with defecation. These symptoms are common and may accumulate during the course of PD but are often under-recognized and challenging to manage. Objective testing can be burdensome to patients and does not correlate well with symptoms. Effective treatment options are limited. Evidence is often based on studies in the general population, and specific evidence in PD is scarce. Upper GI dysfunction may also interfere with the pharmacological treatment of PD motor symptoms, which poses significant management challenges. Several new less invasive assessment tools and novel treatment options have emerged in recent years. The current review provides an overview and a practical approach to recognizing and diagnosing common upper and lower GI problems in PD, e.g., dyspepsia, gastroparesis, small bowel dysfunction, chronic constipation, and defecatory dysfunction. Management aspects are discussed based on the latest evidence from the PD and general populations, with insights for future research pertaining to GI dysfunction in PD.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Associations between gut microbiota characteristics and non‐motor symptoms following pharmacological and surgical treatments in Parkinson's disease patients
    Agnieszka Gorecka‐Mazur, Anna Krygowska‐Wajs, Agata Furgala, Jiaqi Li, Benjamin Misselwitz, Wojciech Pietraszko, Borys Kwinta, Bahtiyar Yilmaz
    Neurogastroenterology & Motility.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Clinical diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of neurodyspepsia syndrome using intelligent medicine
    Jingyu Zhu, Wei Meng, Liang Liu, Peixin Hu, Yuling Liang, Wenwen Zhu, Xiaoyan Zhu
    Open Life Sciences.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Articles
Safinamide as an Adjunct to Levodopa in Asian and Caucasian Patients With Parkinson’s Disease and Motor Fluctuations: A Post Hoc Analysis of the SETTLE Study
Roongroj Bhidayasiri, Takayuki Ishida, Takanori Kamei, Ryan Edbert Husni, Ippei Suzuki, Shey Lin Wu, Jin Whan Cho
J Mov Disord. 2023;16(2):180-190.   Published online April 26, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22196
  • 2,297 View
  • 175 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Safinamide is a selective, reversible monoamine oxidase B inhibitor with demonstrated efficacy and tolerability in placebo-controlled studies and is clinically useful for patients with motor fluctuations. This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of safinamide as a levodopa adjunct therapy in Asian patients with Parkinson’s disease.
Methods
Data from 173 Asian and 371 Caucasian patients from the international Phase III SETTLE study were included in this post hoc analysis. The safinamide dose was increased from 50 mg/day to 100 mg/day if no tolerability issues occurred at week 2. The primary outcome was the change from baseline to week 24 in daily ON-time without troublesome dyskinesia (i.e., ON-time). Key secondary outcomes included changes in Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) scores.
Results
Safinamide significantly increased daily ON-time relative to placebo in both groups (least-squares mean: 0.83 hours, p = 0.011 [Asians]; 1.05 hours, p < 0.0001 [Caucasians]). Motor function relative to placebo (UPDRS Part III) improved significantly in Asians (-2.65 points, p = 0.012) but not Caucasians (-1.44 points, p = 0.0576). Safinamide did not worsen Dyskinesia Rating Scale scores in either subgroup, regardless of the presence or absence of dyskinesia at baseline. Dyskinesia was largely mild for Asians and moderate for Caucasians. None of the Asian patients experienced adverse events leading to treatment discontinuation.
Conclusion
Safinamide as a levodopa adjunct is well tolerated and effective in reducing motor fluctuations in both Asian and Caucasian patients. Further studies to investigate the real-world effectiveness and safety of safinamide in Asia are warranted.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Effects of Safinamide in Chinese and Non-Chinese Patients with Parkinson’s Disease
    Carlo Cattaneo, Jaime Kulisevsky
    Advances in Therapy.2024; 41(2): 638.     CrossRef
  • Safinamide as adjunctive therapy to levodopa monotherapy for patients with Parkinson's disease with wearing-off: The Japanese observational J-SILVER study
    Noriko Nishikawa, Taku Hatano, Kenya Nishioka, Shin-Ichi Ueno, Shinji Saiki, Ryota Nakamura, Asako Yoritaka, Takashi Ogawa, Yasushi Shimo, Wataru Sako, Hideki Shimura, Yoshiaki Furukawa, Takanori Kamei, Takayuki Ishida, Nobutaka Hattori
    Journal of the Neurological Sciences.2024; 461: 123051.     CrossRef
Potential Link Between Cognition and Motor Reserve in Patients With Parkinson’s Disease
Seok Jong Chung, Yae Ji Kim, Yun Joong Kim, Hye Sun Lee, Mijin Yun, Phil Hyu Lee, Yong Jeong, Young H. Sohn
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(3):249-257.   Published online September 7, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22063
  • 3,018 View
  • 151 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
To investigate whether there is a link between cognitive function and motor reserve (i.e., individual capacity to cope with nigrostriatal dopamine depletion) in patients with newly diagnosed Parkinson’s disease (PD).
Methods
A total of 163 patients with drug-naïve PD who underwent 18F-FP-CIT PET, brain MRI, and a detailed neuropsychological test were enrolled. We estimated individual motor reserve based on initial motor deficits and striatal dopamine depletion using a residual model. We performed correlation analyses between motor reserve estimates and cognitive composite scores. Diffusion connectometry analysis was performed to map the white matter fiber tracts, of which fractional anisotropy (FA) values were well correlated with motor reserve estimates. Additionally, Cox regression analysis was used to assess the effect of initial motor reserve on the risk of dementia conversion.
Results
The motor reserve estimate was positively correlated with the composite score of the verbal memory function domain (γ = 0.246) and with the years of education (γ = 0.251). Connectometry analysis showed that FA values in the left fornix were positively correlated with the motor reserve estimate, while no fiber tracts were negatively correlated with the motor reserve estimate. Cox regression analysis demonstrated that higher motor reserve estimates tended to be associated with a lower risk of dementia conversion (hazard ratio, 0.781; 95% confidence interval, 0.576–1.058).
Conclusion
The present study demonstrated that the motor reserve estimate was well correlated with verbal memory function and with white matter integrity in the left fornix, suggesting a possible link between cognition and motor reserve in patients with PD.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Hippocampal Perfusion Affects Motor and Cognitive Functions in Parkinson Disease: An Early Phase 18F‐FP‐CIT Positron Emission Tomography Study
    Min Young Chun, Seok Jong Chung, Su Hong Kim, Chan Wook Park, Seong Ho Jeong, Hye Sun Lee, Phil Hyu Lee, Young H. Sohn, Yong Jeong, Yun Joong Kim
    Annals of Neurology.2024; 95(2): 388.     CrossRef
  • Imaging Procedure and Clinical Studies of [18F]FP-CIT PET
    Changhwan Sung, Seung Jun Oh, Jae Seung Kim
    Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Influence of cognitive reserve on cognitive and motor function in α-synucleinopathies: A systematic review and multilevel meta-analysis
    Isaac Saywell, Lauren Foreman, Brittany Child, Alexander L. Phillips-Hughes, Lyndsey Collins-Praino, Irina Baetu
    Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews.2024; 161: 105672.     CrossRef
  • Structural underpinnings and long-term effects of resilience in Parkinson’s disease
    Verena Dzialas, Merle C. Hoenig, Stéphane Prange, Gérard N. Bischof, Alexander Drzezga, Thilo van Eimeren
    npj Parkinson's Disease.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Considering the response in addition to the challenge – a narrative review in appraisal of a motor reserve framework
    Daniel Zeller, Shawn Hiew, Thorsten Odorfer, Carine Nguemeni
    Aging.2024; 16(6): 5772.     CrossRef
  • Defining the concept of reserve in the motor domain: a systematic review
    Andreina Giustiniani, Angelo Quartarone
    Frontiers in Neuroscience.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Extra-Basal Ganglia Brain Structures Are Related to Motor Reserve in Parkinson’s Disease
    Jinyoung Youn, Ji Hye Won, Mansu Kim, Junmo Kwon, Seung Hwan Moon, Minkyeong Kim, Jong Hyun Ahn, Jun Kyu Mun, Hyunjin Park, Jin Whan Cho
    Journal of Parkinson's Disease.2023; 13(1): 39.     CrossRef
Review Article
The Supplementary Motor Complex in Parkinson’s Disease
Shervin Rahimpour, Shashank Rajkumar, Mark Hallett
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(1):21-32.   Published online November 25, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21075
  • 6,269 View
  • 384 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by both motor and nonmotor symptoms. Although the basal ganglia is traditionally the primary brain region implicated in this disease process, this limited view ignores the roles of the cortex and cerebellum that are networked with the basal ganglia to support motor and cognitive functions. In particular, recent research has highlighted dysfunction in the supplementary motor complex (SMC) in patients with PD. Using the PubMed and Google Scholar search engines, we identified research articles using keywords pertaining to the involvement of the SMC in action sequencing impairments, temporal processing disturbances, and gait impairment in patients with PD. A review of abstracts and full-text articles was used to identify relevant articles. In this review of 63 articles, we focus on the role of the SMC in PD, highlighting anatomical and functional data to create new perspectives in understanding clinical symptoms and, potentially, new therapeutic targets. The SMC has a nuanced role in the pathophysiology of PD, with both hypo- and hyperactivation associated with various symptoms. Further studies using more standardized patient populations and functional tasks are needed to more clearly elucidate the role of this region in the pathophysiology and treatment of PD.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Impaired topological properties of cortical morphological brain networks correlate with motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease
    Su Yan, Jun Lu, Yuanhao Li, Tian Tian, Yiran Zhou, Hongquan Zhu, Yuanyuan Qin, Wenzhen Zhu
    Journal of Neuroradiology.2024; 51(4): 101155.     CrossRef
  • Libet’s legacy: A primer to the neuroscience of volition
    Tomáš Dominik, Alfred Mele, Aaron Schurger, Uri Maoz
    Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews.2024; 157: 105503.     CrossRef
  • Neural correlates of fine motor grasping skills: Longitudinal insights into motor cortex activation using fNIRS
    Xiaoli Li, Minxia Jin, Nan Zhang, Wei Hongman, LianHui Fu, Qi Qi
    Brain and Behavior.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Affection of Motor Network Regions by Tau Pathology Across the Alzheimer's Disease Spectrum
    Gérard N. Bischof, Elena Jaeger, Kathrin Giehl, Merle C. Hönig, Peter H. Weiss, Alexander Drzezga
    eneuro.2024; 11(1): ENEURO.0242-23.2023.     CrossRef
  • Parkinson’s Disease Risk Variant rs9638616 is Non-Specifically Associated with Altered Brain Structure and Function
    Thomas Welton, Thomas Wei Jun Teo, Ling Ling Chan, Eng-King Tan, Louis Chew Seng Tan
    Journal of Parkinson's Disease.2024; 14(4): 713.     CrossRef
  • HD-tDCS over left supplementary motor area differentially modulated neural correlates of motor planning for speech vs. limb movement
    Fatemeh Tabari, Celeste Patron, Hope Cryer, Karim Johari
    International Journal of Psychophysiology.2024; 201: 112357.     CrossRef
  • Sensorimotor network connectivity correlates with motor improvement after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with Parkinson's disease
    Shumei Chi, Xinrui Wen, Yang Yu, Guanjun Wang, Jie Zhang, Chuang Xue, Xiaoying Zhang, Zheng Wang, Meiduo Gesang, Jiefang Chen, Sha Wu, Man Jin, Jian Liu, Benyan Luo
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2023; 106: 105218.     CrossRef
  • A new model for freedom of movement using connectomic analysis
    Diego Alonzo Rodríguez-Méndez, Daniel San-Juan, Mark Hallett, Chris G. Antonopoulos, Erick López-Reynoso, Ricardo Lara-Ramírez
    PeerJ.2022; 10: e13602.     CrossRef
  • Cortical and subcortical morphological alterations in motor subtypes of Parkinson’s disease
    Jianyu Li, Yuanchao Zhang, Zitong Huang, Yihan Jiang, Zhanbing Ren, Daihong Liu, Jiuquan Zhang, Roberta La Piana, Yifan Chen
    npj Parkinson's Disease.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Brief communication
Dance Intervention Using the Feldenkrais Method Improves Motor, and Non-Motor Symptoms and Gait in Parkinson’s Disease: A 12-Month Study
Sung Hoon Kang, Jinhee Kim, Ilsoo Kim, Young Ae Moon, Sojung Park, Seong-Beom Koh
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(1):53-57.   Published online November 3, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21086
  • 4,512 View
  • 383 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
The aim of this study was to assess the effects of dancing (using the Feldenkrais method) on motor and non-motor symptoms, quality of life (QoL), and objective parameters of gait at the time of intervention and at the end of the 1-year study period.
Methods
This was a single-arm study in which 12 subjects with Parkinson’s disease (PD) received dance intervention during a 6-month period. Objective motor scales, gait analysis, and questionnaires on non-motor symptoms were evaluated at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months.
Results
Dance intervention decreased motor scale (Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale and Tinetti scale) scores and improved gait disturbance (gait velocity and step length) without increasing levodopa equivalent dose. Furthermore, dancing decreased non-motor scale (Non-Motor Symptoms Scale and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale) scores and improved QoL.
Conclusion
Our findings suggest that dance intervention can be a complementary management method for PD patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Mild cognitive impairment is associated with poor gait performance in patients with Parkinson’s disease
    Sung Hoon Kang, Jinhee Kim, Jungyeun Lee, Seong-Beom Koh
    Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Article
Factors Associated with Medication Beliefs in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study
Sung Reul Kim, Ji Young Kim, Hye Young Kim, Hui Young So, Sun Ju Chung
J Mov Disord. 2021;14(2):133-143.   Published online May 3, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20147
  • 6,480 View
  • 129 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Medication beliefs are a significant determinant of medication adherence in chronic illness. This study aimed to identify demographic, clinical, and medication-related factors associated with medication beliefs in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD).
Methods
We used a descriptive cross-sectional design with a convenience sample of 173 PD patients who had been taking antiparkinson drugs for more than one year.
Results
The subjects who believed PD medication was more necessary had more severe illness, younger age of onset, longer illness duration, and longer duration of levodopa therapy. They had higher levels of non-motor symptoms and depression, number of medication uses, number of drugs, and levodopa equivalent dose, and they reported fluctuation of motor symptoms and dyskinesia. The subjects who used catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitors, dopamine agonists, amantadine, and monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B) inhibitors had significantly higher necessity scores than those who did not use them. The subjects who had higher concerns about PD medications had higher levels of non-motor symptoms and depression. The subjects using amantadine and anticholinergics had significantly higher concern scores than those who did not use them. Positive necessity-concerns differentials were associated with severe illness, the presence of motor fluctuation and dyskinesia, and the use of COMT inhibitors. Based on stepwise multiple regression, the most significant factors influencing necessity beliefs were severe illness, followed by depression and motor fluctuation.
Conclusion
Severe illness, higher levels of depression, and motor fluctuation are independent factors influencing patients’ beliefs regarding medication necessity. Therefore, these characteristics should be considered in medication belief assessment and interventions for PD patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Adherence to Parkinson's disease medication: A case study to illustrate reasons for non-adherence, implications for practice and engaging under-represented participants in research
    Delyth James, Joshua Smith, Emma Lane, Rhian Thomas, Sarah Brown, Heidi Seage
    Exploratory Research in Clinical and Social Pharmacy.2024; 14: 100450.     CrossRef
  • Relationship Between Medication Literacy and Beliefs Among Persons with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Guangdong, China
    Sifen Jiang, Zhuoqi Zhu, Guisheng Liao, Yanling Huang, Lichang Li, Kun Zeng
    Patient Preference and Adherence.2023; Volume 17: 2039.     CrossRef
  • Effect of Pillbox Organizers with Alarms on Adherence to Pharmacotherapy in Parkinson Disease Patients Taking Three and More Daily Doses of Dopaminergic Medications
    Igor Straka, Michal Minar, Milan Grofik, Matej Skorvanek, Veronika Bolekova, Andrea Gazova, Jan Kyselovic, Peter Valkovic
    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2022; 12(2): 179.     CrossRef
  • Factors Related to Beliefs about Medication in Ischemic Stroke Patients
    Gye-Gyoung Kim, Sung-Hee Yoo, Man-Seok Park, Hyun-Young Park, Jae-Kwan Cha
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2022; 11(13): 3825.     CrossRef
  • Lycium barbarum polysaccharide improves dopamine metabolism and symptoms in an MPTP-induced model of Parkinson’s disease
    Jiangbo Song, Lian Liu, Zhiquan Li, Ting Mao, Jianfei Zhang, Lei Zhou, Xin Chen, Yunzhu Shang, Tao Sun, Yuxin Luo, Yu Jiang, Duan Tan, Xiaoling Tong, Fangyin Dai
    BMC Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Brief communication
Effectiveness of Exercise on the Sequence Effect in Parkinson’s Disease
Suk Yun Kang, Young Ho Sohn
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(3):213-217.   Published online August 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20045
  • 5,245 View
  • 143 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
To determine the benefits of motor training on the sequence effect (SE), an essential component of bradykinesia in Parkinson’s disease (PD).
Methods
Seven patients with de novo PD participated in this study. The patients performed regular pentagon drawing tests and exercises during four visits. The first two visits occurred before the start of medication, and the last two visits occurred at least six months after the start of medication. We assessed the severity of bradykinesia and SE at each visit and compared the results before and after exercise in both the de novo and treatment conditions.
Results
In the de novo condition, the severity of bradykinesia significantly improved after motor training (p = 0.018), but it did not resolve and only showed a trend of improvement after treatment (p = 0.068). The severity of the SE decreased significantly in the drug-naïve condition (p = 0.028) but not after medication (p = 0.273).
Conclusion
Our study suggests that regular motor training may be beneficial for the SE in PD.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Exploring the Complex Phenotypes of Impaired Finger Dexterity in Mild-to-moderate Stage Parkinson’s Disease: A Time-Series Analysis
    Pattamon Panyakaew, Kotchakorn Duangjino, Apiwoot Kerddonfag, Teerit Ploensin, Krerk Piromsopa, Chanon Kongkamol, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
    Journal of Parkinson's Disease.2023; 13(6): 975.     CrossRef
  • The Effects of Intensive Neurorehabilitation on Sequence Effect in Parkinson's Disease Patients With and Without Freezing of Gait
    Alessia Putortì, Michele Corrado, Micol Avenali, Daniele Martinelli, Marta Allena, Silvano Cristina, Valentina Grillo, Luca Martinis, Stefano Tamburin, Mariano Serrao, Antonio Pisani, Cristina Tassorelli, Roberto De Icco
    Frontiers in Neurology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Review Article
Emerging Concepts of Motor Reserve in Parkinson’s Disease
Seok Jong Chung, Jae Jung Lee, Phil Hyu Lee, Young H. Sohn
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(3):171-184.   Published online August 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20029
  • 10,290 View
  • 310 Download
  • 32 Web of Science
  • 33 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
The concept of cognitive reserve (CR) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) explains the differences between individuals in their susceptibility to AD-related pathologies. An enhanced CR may lead to less cognitive deficits despite severe pathological lesions. Parkinson’s disease (PD) is also a common neurodegenerative disease and is mainly characterized by motor dysfunction related to striatal dopaminergic depletion. The degree of motor deficits in PD is closely correlated to the degree of dopamine depletion; however, significant individual variations still exist. Therefore, we hypothesized that the presence of motor reserve (MR) in PD explains the individual differences in motor deficits despite similar levels of striatal dopamine depletion. Since 2015, we have performed a series of studies investigating MR in de novo patients with PD using the data of initial clinical presentation and dopamine transporter PET scan. In this review, we summarized the results of these published studies. In particular, some premorbid experiences (i.e., physical activity and education) and modifiable factors (i.e., body mass index and white matter hyperintensity on brain image studies) could modulate an individual’s capacity to tolerate PD pathology, which can be maintained throughout disease progression.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • How long have you exercised in your life? The effect of motor reserve and current physical activity on cognitive performance
    Veronica Pucci, Carolina Guerra, Amanda Barsi, Massimo Nucci, Sara Mondini
    Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society.2024; 30(1): 11.     CrossRef
  • Hippocampal Perfusion Affects Motor and Cognitive Functions in Parkinson Disease: An Early Phase 18F‐FP‐CIT Positron Emission Tomography Study
    Min Young Chun, Seok Jong Chung, Su Hong Kim, Chan Wook Park, Seong Ho Jeong, Hye Sun Lee, Phil Hyu Lee, Young H. Sohn, Yong Jeong, Yun Joong Kim
    Annals of Neurology.2024; 95(2): 388.     CrossRef
  • Differences in [123I]Ioflupane Striatal Binding Between African American and White Patients
    Juebin Huang, Kevin J. Sullivan, Vani Vijayakumar
    Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology.2024; 52(2): 137.     CrossRef
  • Plasma extracellular vesicle synaptic proteins as biomarkers of clinical progression in patients with Parkinson’s disease
    Chien-Tai Hong, Chen-Chih Chung, Ruan-Ching Yu, Lung Chan
    eLife.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Plasma extracellular vesicle synaptic proteins as biomarkers of clinical progression in patients with Parkinson’s disease
    Chien-Tai Hong, Chen-Chih Chung, Ruan-Ching Yu, Lung Chan
    eLife.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Considering the response in addition to the challenge – a narrative review in appraisal of a motor reserve framework
    Daniel Zeller, Shawn Hiew, Thorsten Odorfer, Carine Nguemeni
    Aging.2024; 16(6): 5772.     CrossRef
  • The greatest loss of unpleasant smells may be related to the risk of more severe PD symptoms
    Shih-Chi Chiu, Ting-Chun Fang, Hsin-Bei Lei, Yu-Hsuan Lin, Ming-Hong Chang, Yi-Jen Guo
    Frontiers in Neurology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Lifestyle Modulators of Neuroplasticity in Parkinson’s Disease: Evidence in Human Neuroimaging Studies
    Silvia Paola Caminiti, Silvia Gallo, Federico Menegon, Andrea Naldi, Cristoforo Comi, Giacomo Tondo
    CNS & Neurological Disorders - Drug Targets.2024; 23(5): 602.     CrossRef
  • Defining the concept of reserve in the motor domain: a systematic review
    Andreina Giustiniani, Angelo Quartarone
    Frontiers in Neuroscience.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Structural underpinnings and long-term effects of resilience in Parkinson’s disease
    Verena Dzialas, Merle C. Hoenig, Stéphane Prange, Gérard N. Bischof, Alexander Drzezga, Thilo van Eimeren
    npj Parkinson's Disease.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Motor progression marker for newly diagnosed drug‐naïve patients with Parkinson's disease: A resting‐state functional MRI study
    Yanbing Hou, Lingyu Zhang, Ruwei Ou, Qianqian Wei, Xiaojing Gu, Kuncheng Liu, Junyu Lin, Tianmi Yang, Yi Xiao, Qiyong Gong, Huifang Shang
    Human Brain Mapping.2023; 44(3): 901.     CrossRef
  • The Concept of Motor Reserve in Parkinson's Disease: New Wine in Old Bottles?
    Merle C. Hoenig, Verena Dzialas, Alexander Drzezga, Thilo van Eimeren
    Movement Disorders.2023; 38(1): 16.     CrossRef
  • Patterns of striatal dopamine depletion and motor deficits in de novo Parkinson’s disease
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Brief communication
Risk Factors for Falls in Patients with de novo Parkinson’s Disease: A Focus on Motor and Non-Motor Symptoms
Kyum-Yil Kwon, Mina Lee, Hyunjin Ju, Kayeong Im
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(2):142-145.   Published online May 29, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20009
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
We aimed to identify risk factors for falls in patients with de novo Parkinson’s disease (PD). Methods Forty-six patients with de novo PD were retrospectively included in the study. We assessed details on the patients’ motor symptoms as well as non-motor symptoms using several representative scales for global cognition, depression, fatigue, and dysautonomia. Fallers and non-fallers were identified according to their history of falls during the preceding year. Results Twenty-two patients (45.8%) with de novo PD had a history of falls. Compared with the non-faller group, the faller group exhibited higher scores for postural instability/gait difficulty (PIGD), anxiety, fatigue, total dysautonomia, gastrointestinal dysfunction, and thermoregulatory dysfunction. Moreover, logistic regression analysis showed that falling was positively correlated with anxiety and gastrointestinal symptoms but negatively associated with the tremor scores. Conclusion Our findings suggest that falling in patients with de novo PD is significantly associated with PIGD/non-tremor symptoms, anxiety, and gastrointestinal dysfunction.

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Viewpoint
Future of Tanscranial Magnetic Stimulation in Movement Disorders: Introduction of Novel Methods
Yoshikazu Ugawa, Yasushi Shimo, Yasuo Terao
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(2):115-117.   Published online April 6, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.19083
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PDFSupplementary Material

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Review Article
Principles of Electrophysiological Assessments for Movement Disorders
Kai-Hsiang Stanley Chen, Robert Chen
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(1):27-38.   Published online January 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.19064
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Electrophysiological studies can provide objective and quantifiable assessments of movement disorders. They are useful in the diagnosis of hyperkinetic movement disorders, particularly tremors and myoclonus. The most commonly used measures are surface electromyography (sEMG), electroencephalography (EEG) and accelerometry. Frequency and coherence analyses of sEMG signals may reveal the nature of tremors and the source of the tremors. The effects of voluntary tapping, ballistic movements and weighting of the limbs can help to distinguish between organic and functional tremors. The presence of Bereitschafts-potentials and beta-band desynchronization recorded by EEG before movement onset provide strong evidence for functional movement disorders. EMG burst durations, distributions and muscle recruitment orders may identify and classify myoclonus to cortical, subcortical or spinal origins and help in the diagnosis of functional myoclonus. Organic and functional cervical dystonia can potentially be distinguished by EMG power spectral analysis. Several reflex circuits, such as the long latency reflex, blink reflex and startle reflex, can be elicited with different types of external stimuli and are useful in the assessment of myoclonus, excessive startle and stiff person syndrome. However, limitations of the tests should be recognized, and the results should be interpreted together with clinical observations.

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Original Articles
Comparison of Spontaneous Motor Tempo during Finger Tapping, Toe Tapping and Stepping on the Spot in People with and without Parkinson’s Disease
Dawn Rose, Daniel J. Cameron, Peter J. Lovatt, Jessica A. Grahn, Lucy E. Annett
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(1):47-56.   Published online January 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.19043
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Spontaneous motor tempo (SMT), observed in walking, tapping and clapping, tends to occur around 2 Hz. Initiating and controlling movement can be difficult for people with Parkinson’s (PWP), but studies have not identified whether PWP differ from controls in SMT. For community-based interventions, e.g. dancing, it would be helpful to know a baseline SMT to optimize the tempi of cued activities. Therefore, this study compared finger tapping (FT), toe tapping (TT) and stepping ‘on the spot’ (SS) in PWP and two groups of healthy controls [age-matched controls (AMC) and young healthy controls (YHC)], as SMT is known to change with age.
Methods
Participants (PWP; n = 30, AMC; n = 23, YHC; n = 35) were asked to tap or step on the spot at a natural pace for two trials lasting 40 seconds. The central 30 seconds were averaged for analyses using mean inter-onset intervals (IOI) and coefficient of variation (CoV) to measure rate and variability respectively.
Results
PWP had faster SMT than both control groups, depending on the movement modality: FT, F(2, 87) = 7.92, p < 0.01 (PWP faster than YHC); TT, F(2, 87) = 4.89, p = 0.01 (PWP faster than AMC); and SS, F(2, 77) = 3.26, p = 0.04 (PWP faster than AMC). PWP had higher CoV (more variable tapping) than AMC in FT only, F(2, 87) = 4.10, p = 0.02.
Conclusion
This study provides the first direct comparison of SMT between PWP and two control groups for different types of movements. Results suggest SMT is generally faster in PWP than control groups, and more variable when measured with finger tapping compared to stepping on the spot.

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Asymptomatic Hearing Impairment Frequently Occurs in Early-Onset Parkinson’s Disease
Kuldeep Shetty, Syam Krishnan, Jissa Vinoda Thulaseedharan, Manju Mohan, Asha Kishore
J Mov Disord. 2019;12(2):84-90.   Published online April 5, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18048
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Recent reports of hearing impairment in Parkinson’s disease (PD) have suggested that auditory dysfunction could be a non-motor manifestation of PD. These reports were based on observations of elderly patients for whom presbycusis may, to some extent, have contributed to hearing dysfunction. Therefore, we aimed to explore the auditory functions in younger patients with PD. Methods We conducted a case-control study in a relatively younger (< 55 years of age at study time) population of PD patients and healthy volunteers to test whether auditory dysfunction is a significant non-motor dysfunction in PD. Pure tone audiometry (PTA) and brainstem evoked response audiometry (BERA) were performed in all participants. Results None of the patients or controls reported hearing deficits. Fifty-one patients with PD and 50 healthy volunteers who were age- and gender-matched to the patients participated. PTA-detected hearing impairment was found in 64.7% of patients and 28% of controls (p < 0.001) for both low-mid and/or high frequencies. Hearing impairment was more frequent in the younger subgroups of patients than age-matched controls, while the frequency of hearing impairment was similar in older groups of subjects. BERA was not different between patients and controls. Conclusion Asymptomatic auditory dysfunction is a common non-motor manifestation of early-onset PD and more frequent in younger patients, indicating that it may be independent of aging. The mechanism underlying this dysfunction appears to be peripheral, although a central dysfunction cannot be ruled out based on the findings of this study.

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