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JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders

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Case Report
Young-Onset Parkinson’s Disease with Impulse Control Disorder Due to Novel Variants of F-Box Only Protein 7
Dallah Yoo, Ji-Hyun Choi, Jin-Hee Im, Man Jin Kim, Han-Joon Kim, Sung Sup Park, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(3):225-228.   Published online September 9, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20026
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AbstractAbstract PDF
F-box only protein 7 (FBXO7) is a rare monogenic cause of hereditary Parkinson’s disease (PD) with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance and a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations. Here, we report a de novo PD patient with onset at the age of 28 with novel compound heterozygous variants in the FBXO7 gene (c.1162C>T, p.Gln388X; c.80G>A, p.Arg27His). The clinical features of the patient were problematic impulse control disorder behaviors and pyromania, and pyramidal signs were negative. We describe the novel pathogenic variants of the FBXO7 gene with detailed clinical pictures to report the expanding genotypes and phenotypes of FBXO7-associated parkinsonism.
Original Article
The Impact of Impulsivity on Quality of Life in Early Drug-Naïve Parkinson’s Disease Patients
Dong-Woo Ryu, Joong-Seok Kim, Sang-Won Yoo, Yoon-Sang Oh, Kwang-Soo Lee
J Mov Disord. 2019;12(3):172-176.   Published online August 9, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.19004
Correction in: J Mov Disord 2021;14(2):176
  • 3,606 View
  • 97 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Impulse control disorders (ICDs) in Parkinson’s disease (PD) are mostly related to dopamine replacement therapy (DRT); however, drug-naïve PD patients have also frequently experienced impulsivity. This phenomenon makes clinicians hesitate treating patients with DRT. In this study, we assessed the effect of impulsivity on quality of life (QOL) in drug-naïve PD patients.
Methods
Two hundred three newly diagnosed, nonmedicated PD patients were enrolled, and they received structured clinical interviews, physical examinations and validated questionnaires to evaluate motor and nonmotor symptoms and QOL. Impulsivity was evaluated using the Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson’s Disease-Rating Scale (QUIP-RS).
Results
Thirty-eight patients (18.7%) had impulsivity with QUIP-RS scores ≥ 1 and 4 patients (2.0%) were diagnosed with combined ICDs. Motor and nonmotor symptoms were significantly correlated with the Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire-39 summary index. Female sex and QUIP-RS scores were also correlated with QOL in drug-naïve PD patients.
Conclusion
The results of the present study showed that impulsivity negatively influences QOL in early drug-naïve PD patients. In addition, more severe motor and nonmotor symptoms were also associated with lower QOL. Such findings complicate treatment but provide valuable information for managing early PD.
Review Article
Maladaptive Reward-Learning and Impulse Control Disorders in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease: A Clinical Overview and Pathophysiology Update
Jee-Young Lee, Beom Seok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2014;7(2):67-76.   Published online October 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.14010
  • 36,423 View
  • 120 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Impulse control disorders (ICD) in Parkinson’s disease (PD) are a disabling non-motor symptom with frequencies of 13–35% among patients receiving dopamine replacement therapy. ICD in PD is strongly associated with dopaminergic drug use, especially non-ergot dopamine agonists (DA). However, individual susceptibility and disease-related neural changes are also important contributors to the development of ICD. Discrepancies between nigrostriatal and mesolimbic dopaminergic degeneration and non-physiological administration of dopaminergic drugs may induce abnormal ’hyperstimulation’ of the mesolimbic system, which alters reward-learning behaviors in PD patients. In addition, DA can make patients more impulsive during decision-making and seek risk-taking behaviors. DA intake is also related to the biased representation of rewards. Ultimately, loss of negative feedback control due to dysfunctional frontostriatal connections is necessary for the establishment of ICD in PD. The subsequent behavioral and neural changes are affected by PD treatment and disease progression; thus, proper treatment guidelines for physicians are needed to prevent the development of ICD. Future studies aimed at producing novel therapeutics to control the risk factors for ICD or treat ICD behaviors in PD are warranted. This review summarizes recent advances from epidemiological and pathophysiological studies on ICD in PD. Management principles and limitations of current therapeutics are briefly discussed.
Case Report
Dopaminergic Medication-Related Repetitive Behaviors in Parkinson’s Disease
Jong Sam Baik, Sang Won Han, Jeong Yeon Kim, Jae Hyeon Park
J Mov Disord. 2008;1(2):101-103.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.08020
  • 12,045 View
  • 138 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

A set of impulse control and repetitive behaviors presumed to be related to dopaminergic medications has been recognized in Parkinson’s disease (PD). A 68-year-old man presented with compulsive gathering of new towels for 8 months after increasing his medication dosage. After we reduced a dose of Sinemet® and ropinirole as before, and added amantadine, his repetitive behavior was gone and dyskinesia was improved.


JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders