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Movement Disorders Resulting From Bilateral Basal Ganglia Lesions in End-Stage Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review
Kah Hui Yap, Nurul Husna Baharudin, Abdul Halim Abdul Gafor, Rabani Remli, Shen-Yang Lim, Wan Asyraf Wan Zaidi, Shahrul Azmin, Shahizon Azura Mohamed Mukari, Raihanah Abdul Khalid, Norlinah Mohamed Ibrahim
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(3):258-263.   Published online May 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21185
  • 1,087 View
  • 56 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
The basal ganglia (BG) are susceptible to fluctuations in blood urea levels, sometimes resulting in movement disorders. We described patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) presenting with movement disorders associated with bilateral BG lesions on imaging.
Methods
We report four patients and systematically reviewed all published cases of ESKD presenting with movement disorders and bilateral BG lesions (EBSCOhost and Ovid).
Results
Of the 72 patients identified, 55 (76.4%) were on regular dialysis. Parkinsonism was the most common movement disorder (n = 39; 54.2%), followed by chorea (n = 24; 33.3%). Diabetes mellitus (n = 51; 70.8%) and hypertension (n = 16; 22.2%) were the most common risk factors. Forty-three (59.7%) were of Asian ethnicity. Complete clinical resolution was reported in 17 (30.9%) patients, while 38 (69.1%) had incomplete clinical resolution with relapse. Complete radiological resolution occurred in 14 (34.1%) patients.
Conclusion
Movement disorders associated with BG lesions should be recognized as a rare and potentially reversible metabolic movement disorder in patients with ESKD.
Review Articles
Movement Disorders Following Cerebrovascular Lesion in the Basal Ganglia Circuit
Jinse Park
J Mov Disord. 2016;9(2):71-79.   Published online May 25, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.16005
  • 25,804 View
  • 834 Download
  • 28 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Movement disorders are primarily associated with the basal ganglia and the thalamus; therefore, movement disorders are more frequently manifest after stroke compared with neurological injuries associated with other structures of the brain. Overall clinical features, such as types of movement disorder, the time of onset and prognosis, are similar with movement disorders after stroke in other structures. Dystonia and chorea are commonly occurring post-stroke movement disorders in basal ganglia circuit, and these disorders rarely present with tremor. Rarer movement disorders, including tic, restless leg syndrome, and blepharospasm, can also develop following a stroke. Although the precise mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these conditions have not been fully characterized, disruptions in the crosstalk between the inhibitory and excitatory circuits resulting from vascular insult are proposed to be the underlying cause. The GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid)ergic and dopaminergic systems play key roles in post-stroke movement disorders. This review summarizes movement disorders induced by basal ganglia and thalamic stroke according to the anatomical regions in which they manifest.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
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    Jay Patel, Muhammad Khalil, Sidra Zafar
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    Herbert Alejandro Manosalva
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Nonmotor Symptoms and Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson’s Disease
Han-Joon Kim, Beom S. Jeon, Sun Ha Paek
J Mov Disord. 2015;8(2):83-91.   Published online May 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.15010
  • 22,518 View
  • 229 Download
  • 39 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) is an established treatment for the motor symptoms in patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD). In addition to improvements in motor symptoms, many studies have reported changes in various nonmotor symptoms (NMSs) after STN DBS in patients with PD. Psychiatric symptoms, including depression, apathy, anxiety, and impulsivity, can worsen or improve depending on the electrical stimulation parameters, the locations of the stimulating contacts within the STN, and changes in medications after surgery. Global cognitive function is not affected by STN DBS, and there is no increase in the incidence of dementia after STN DBS compared to that after medical treatment, although clinically insignificant declines in verbal fluency have been consistently reported. Pain, especially PD-related pain, improves with STN DBS. Evidence regarding the effects of STN DBS on autonomic symptoms and sleep-related problems is limited and remains conflicting. Many symptoms of nonmotor fluctuations, which are occasionally more troublesome than motor fluctuations, improve with STN DBS. Although it is clear that NMSs are not target symptoms for STN DBS, NMSs have a strong influence on the quality of life of patients with PD, and clinicians should thus be aware of these NMSs when deciding whether to perform surgery and should pay attention to changes in these symptoms after STN DBS to ensure the optimal care for patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
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One View of the Current State of Understanding in Basal Ganglia Pathophysiology and What is Needed for the Future
Erwin B. Montgomery
J Mov Disord. 2011;4(1):13-20.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.11003
  • 15,813 View
  • 48 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS), arguably, is the most dramatic development in movement disorders since the levodopa for Parkinson’s disease. Yet, its mechanisms of action of DBS are unknown. However, DBS related research already has demonstrated that current concepts of basal ganglia pathophysiology are wrong. Specifically, the notion that over-activity of the globus pallidus interna causes parkinsonism, the basis for the most current theories, is no longer tenable. The development of any new theory will be aided by an understanding of how current theories are wrong and why have these flawed theories persist. Many of the problems of current theories are more matters of inference, assumptions, presumptions, and the accepted level of ambiguity than they are of fact. Consequently, it is imperative that these issues be addressed. Just as the inappropriate use of a tool or method is grounds for criticism, methods of reasoning are tools that can be used inappropriately and should be subject to discussion just as misuse of any other tool. Thorough criticism can provide very important lesions though the process could be mistaken as harsh or personal; neither is the case here. At the least, such analyzes can point to potential pitfalls that could be avoided in the development of new theories. As will be discussed, theories are important for the development of therapies but perhaps most important, for the acceptance of new therapies, as was the case for the recent resurgence of interest in surgical therapies.

Citations

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  • Basal ganglia and beyond: The interplay between motor and cognitive aspects in Parkinson’s disease rehabilitation
    Davide Ferrazzoli, Paola Ortelli, Graziella Madeo, Nir Giladi, Giselle M. Petzinger, Giuseppe Frazzitta
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Electrophysiological Evidences of Organization of Cortical Motor Information in the Basal Ganglia
Hirokazu Iwamuro
J Mov Disord. 2011;4(1):8-12.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.11002
  • 10,047 View
  • 74 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF

During the last two decades, the many developments in the treatment of movement disorders such as Parkinson disease and dystonia have enhanced our understanding on organization of the basal ganglia, and this knowledge has led to other advances in the field. According to many electrophysiological and anatomical findings, it is considered that motor information from different cortical areas is processed through several cortico-basal ganglia loops principally in a parallel fashion and somatotopy from each cortical area is also well preserved in each loop. Moreover, recent studies suggest that not only the parallel processing but also some convergence of information occur through the basal ganglia. Information from cortical areas whose functions are close to each other tends to converge in the basal ganglia. The cortico-basal ganglia loops should be comprehended more as a network rather than as separated subdivisions. However, the functions of this convergence still remain unknown. It is important even for clinical doctors to be well informed about this kind of current knowledge because some symptoms of movement disorders may be explained by disorganization of the information network in the basal ganglia.

Case Reports
Chorea in the Both Lower Limbs Associated with Nonketotic Hyperglycemia
Young-Hee Sung, Ki-Hyung Park, Yeung-Bae Lee, Hyeon-Mi Park, Dong-Jin Shin
J Mov Disord. 2009;2(2):98-100.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.09027
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  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Hemichorea-hemiballism (HC-HB) is a complication of non-ketotic hyperglycemia (NKH); in NKH patients, the frequency of occurrence of HC-HB is greater than that of bilateral chorea. We report the case of a hyperglycemic patient who showed chorea in both the lower limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed high signal intensity on T1-weighted images of the bilateral dorsolateral putamen. The abnormal involuntary movements disappeared after oral administration of haloperidol. Our case report that chorea associated with NKH is correlated with the topography of the basal ganglia.

Citations

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  • Mechanistic insights into the role of serum-glucocorticoid kinase 1 in diabetic nephropathy: A systematic review
    Saba Noor, Taj Mohammad, Gulam M. Ashraf, Joviana Farhat, Anwar L. Bilgrami, Mathew Suji Eapen, Sukhwinder Singh Sohal, Dharmendra Kumar Yadav, Md Imtaiyaz Hassan
    International Journal of Biological Macromolecules.2021; 193: 562.     CrossRef
  • “Diabetic striatopathy”: clinical presentations, controversy, pathogenesis, treatments, and outcomes
    Choon-Bing Chua, Cheuk-Kwan Sun, Chih-Wei Hsu, Yi-Cheng Tai, Chih-Yu Liang, I-Ting Tsai
    Scientific Reports.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • T2*-based MR imaging of hyperglycemia-induced hemichorea-hemiballism
    Fang Yu, Andrew Steven, Lee Birnbaum, Wilson Altmeyer
    Journal of Neuroradiology.2017; 44(1): 24.     CrossRef
  • Acute chorea in the diabetic nonketotic hyperosmolar state
    Aaron de Souza, C. Shyam Babu, Paresh K. Desai
    Basal Ganglia.2013; 3(2): 85.     CrossRef
Compulsive Shopping in Parkinson’s Disease - A Case Report
Hyun Cho, Ji-hyun Kwan, Hyun-jin Seo
J Mov Disord. 2008;1(2):97-100.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.08019
  • 13,711 View
  • 106 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) are at risk of a number of compulsive behaviors associated with dopaminergic drugs. We report one case of unusual compulsive shopping in idiopathic Parkinson disease (IPD) in relation to dopaminergic therapy. The mechanism explaining the behavior in this case is likely related to increased dopaminergic stimulation of non-motor basal ganglia loops. It suggests that perhaps many dopaminergic medications can be associated with compulsive behaviors.

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  • Kompulsif Satın Alma Davranışının Y ve Z Kuşaklarında Cinsiyetler Arası Analizi
    Asena Gizem YİĞİT, Mehmet YİĞİT
    OPUS Uluslararası Toplum Araştırmaları Dergisi.2020; 16(28): 1.     CrossRef

JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders