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JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders

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Review Article
Evidence of Inflammation in Parkinson’s Disease and Its Contribution to Synucleinopathy
Thuy Thi Lai, Yun Joong Kim, Hyeo-il Ma, Young Eun Kim
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(1):1-14.   Published online November 3, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21078
  • 3,191 View
  • 410 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Accumulation of alpha-synuclein (αSyn) protein in neurons is a renowned pathological hallmark of Parkinson’s disease (PD). In addition, accumulating evidence indicates that activated inflammatory responses are involved in the pathogenesis of PD. Thus, achieving a better understanding of the interaction between inflammation and synucleinopathy in relation to the PD process will facilitate the development of promising disease-modifying therapies. In this review, the evidence of inflammation in PD is discussed, and human, animal, and laboratory studies relevant to the relationship between inflammation and αSyn are explored as well as new therapeutic targets associated with this relationship.
Original Articles
Musculoskeletal Problems Affect the Quality of Life of Patients with Parkinson’s Disease
Young Eun Kim, Han-Joon Kim, Ji Young Yun, Woong-Woo Lee, Hui-Jun Yang, Jong-Min Kim, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2018;11(3):133-138.   Published online September 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18022
  • 5,709 View
  • 130 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Musculoskeletal problems are more common in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) than in normal elderly, but the impact of musculoskeletal problems on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with PD is unknown.
Methods
Four hundred consecutive patients with PD were enrolled for the evaluation of musculoskeletal problems and HRQoL. HRQoL was assessed by the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, which comprised physical health and mental health.
Results
Of the total patients, 265 patients had musculoskeletal problems, and 135 patients did not have musculoskeletal problems. Patients with musculoskeletal problems reported lower levels of HRQoL in terms of physical health than did patients without musculoskeletal problems (p < 0.05). In women, all components of physical health were lower in patients with musculoskeletal problems than in patients without musculoskeletal problems (p < 0.05). Meanwhile, in men, only the bodily pain score of physical health was lower in patients with musculoskeletal problems than in patients without musculoskeletal problems. Mental health and physical health were negatively correlated with depression, Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale I & II scores, and pain severity from musculoskeletal problems, in that order (p < 0.01 for all).
Conclusion
These results suggest that musculoskeletal problems in patients with PD affect HRQoL significantly, mainly in terms of physical health rather than mental health and especially in women rather than men. Musculoskeletal problems should not be overlooked in the care of patients with PD.
Amantadine and the Risk of Dyskinesia in Patients with Early Parkinson’s Disease: An Open-Label, Pragmatic Trial
Aryun Kim, Young Eun Kim, Ji Young Yun, Han-Joon Kim, Hui-Jun Yang, Woong-Woo Lee, Chae Won Shin, Hyeyoung Park, Yu Jin Jung, Ahro Kim, Yoon Kim, Mihee Jang, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2018;11(2):65-71.   Published online May 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18005
  • 6,810 View
  • 214 Download
  • 12 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
We examined whether amantadine can prevent the development of dyskinesia.
Methods
Patients with drug-naïve Parkinson’s disease (PD), younger than 70 years of age and in the early stage of PD (Hoehn and Yahr scale < 3), were recruited from April 2011 to December 2014. The exclusion criteria included the previous use of antiparkinsonian medication, the presence of dyskinesia, significant psychological disorders, and previous history of a hypersensitivity reaction. Patients were consecutively assigned to one of 3 treatment groups in an open label fashion: Group A-1, amantadine first and then levodopa when needed; Group A-2, amantadine first, dopamine agonist when needed, and then levodopa; and Group B, dopamine agonist first and then levodopa when needed. The primary endpoint was the development of dyskinesia, which was analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier survival rate.
Results
A total of 80 patients were enrolled: Group A-1 (n = 27), Group A-2 (n = 27), and Group B (n = 26). Twenty-four patients were excluded from the analysis due to the following: withdrawal of amantadine or dopamine agonist (n = 9), alternative diagnosis (n = 2), withdrawal of consent (n = 1), and breach in the protocol (n = 12). After exclusion, 5 of the 56 (8.93%) patients developed dyskinesia. Patients in Group A-1 and A-2 tended to develop dyskinesia less often than those in Group B (cumulative survival rates of 0.933, 0.929, and 0.700 for A-1, A-2, and B, respectively; p = 0.453).
Conclusion
Amantadine as an initial treatment may decrease the incidence of dyskinesia in patients with drug-naïve PD.
Letter to the editor
Metronidazole-Induced Craniocervical Myoclonus with Reversible Bilateral Dentate Nucleus Lesions
Hyun Chang Lee, Young Eun Kim, Hyeo-Il Ma
J Mov Disord. 2017;10(1):67-68.   Published online January 18, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.16021
  • 10,624 View
  • 118 Download
  • 2 Citations
PDF
Original Article
Clinical Heterogeneity of Atypical Pantothenate Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration in Koreans
Jae-Hyeok Lee, Jongkyu Park, Ho-Sung Ryu, Hyeyoung Park, Young Eun Kim, Jin Yong Hong, Sang Ook Nam, Young-Hee Sung, Seung-Hwan Lee, Jee-Young Lee, Myung Jun Lee, Tae-Hyoung Kim, Chul Hyoung Lyoo, Sun Ju Chung, Seong Beom Koh, Phil Hyu Lee, Jin Whan Cho, Mee Young Park, Yun Joong Kim, Young H. Sohn, Beom Seok Jeon, Myung Sik Lee
J Mov Disord. 2016;9(1):20-27.   Published online January 25, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.15058
  • 18,425 View
  • 210 Download
  • 13 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) represents a group of inherited movement disorders characterized by iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. Recent advances have included the identification of new causative genes and highlighted the wide phenotypic variation between and within the specific NBIA subtypes. This study aimed to investigate the current status of NBIA in Korea.
Methods
We collected genetically confirmed NBIA patients from twelve nationwide referral hospitals and from a review of the literature. We conducted a study to describe the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of Korean adults with atypical pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN).
Results
Four subtypes of NBIA including PKAN (n = 30), PLA2G6-related neurodegeneration (n = 2), beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration (n = 1), and aceruloplasminemia (n = 1) have been identified in the Korean population. The clinical features of fifteen adults with atypical PKAN included early focal limb dystonia, parkinsonism-predominant feature, oromandibular dystonia, and isolated freezing of gait (FOG). Patients with a higher age of onset tended to present with parkinsonism and FOG. The p.R440P and p.D378G mutations are two major mutations that represent approximately 50% of the mutated alleles. Although there were no specific genotype-phenotype correlations, most patients carrying the p.D378G mutation had a late-onset, atypical form of PKAN.
Conclusions
We found considerable phenotypic heterogeneity in Korean adults with atypical PKAN. The age of onset may influence the presentation of extrapyramidal symptoms.
Review Article
Genetics of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy
Sun Young Im, Young Eun Kim, Yun Joong Kim
J Mov Disord. 2015;8(3):122-129.   Published online September 10, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.15033
  • 25,298 View
  • 364 Download
  • 32 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative syndrome that is clinically characterized by progressive postural instability, supranuclear gaze palsy, parkinsonism and cognitive decline. Pathologically, diagnosis of PSP is based on characteristic features, such as neurofibrillary tangles, neutrophil threads, tau-positive astrocytes and their processes in basal ganglia and brainstem, and the accumulation of 4 repeat tau protein. PSP is generally recognized as a sporadic disorder; however, understanding of genetic background of PSP has been expanding rapidly. Here we review relevant publications to outline the genetics of PSP. Although only small number of familial PSP cases have been reported, the recognition of familial PSP has been increasing. In some familial cases of clinically probable PSP, PSP pathologies were confirmed based on NINDS neuropathological diagnostic criteria. Several mutations in MAPT, the gene that causes a form of familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration with tauopathy, have been identified in both sporadic and familial PSP cases. The H1 haplotype of MAPT is a risk haplotype for PSP, and within H1, a sub-haplotype (H1c) is associated with PSP. A recent genome-wide association study on autopsyproven PSP revealed additional PSP risk alleles in STX6 and EIF2AK3. Several heredodegenerative parkinsonian disorders are referred to as PSP-look-alikes because their clinical phenotype, but not their pathology, mimics PSP. Due to the fast development of genomics and bioinformatics, more genetic factors related to PSP are expected to be discovered. Undoubtedly, these studies will provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of PSP and clues for developing therapeutic strategies.
Case Report
Amantadine Induced Corneal Edema in a Patient with Primary Progressive Freezing of Gait
Young Eun Kim, Ji Young Yun, Hui-Jun Yang, Han-Joon Kim, Mee Kum Kim, Won Ryang Wee, Beom S. Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2013;6(2):34-36.   Published online October 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.13008
  • 16,554 View
  • 60 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Amantadine is commonly used for Parkinsonism. However amantadine can induce adverse corneal reaction. Here we report a patient with primary progressive freezing of gait who had severe corneal edema associated with amantadine, which was reversible after discontinuation of the amantadine. This report alerts neurologists for this reversible but potentially critical corneal edema in patients with Parkinsonism who are receiving amantadine.


JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders