Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
3 "Yoon Kim"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles
Original Article
Amantadine and the Risk of Dyskinesia in Patients with Early Parkinson’s Disease: An Open-Label, Pragmatic Trial
Aryun Kim, Young Eun Kim, Ji Young Yun, Han-Joon Kim, Hui-Jun Yang, Woong-Woo Lee, Chae Won Shin, Hyeyoung Park, Yu Jin Jung, Ahro Kim, Yoon Kim, Mihee Jang, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2018;11(2):65-71.   Published online May 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18005
  • 6,810 View
  • 214 Download
  • 12 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
We examined whether amantadine can prevent the development of dyskinesia.
Methods
Patients with drug-naïve Parkinson’s disease (PD), younger than 70 years of age and in the early stage of PD (Hoehn and Yahr scale < 3), were recruited from April 2011 to December 2014. The exclusion criteria included the previous use of antiparkinsonian medication, the presence of dyskinesia, significant psychological disorders, and previous history of a hypersensitivity reaction. Patients were consecutively assigned to one of 3 treatment groups in an open label fashion: Group A-1, amantadine first and then levodopa when needed; Group A-2, amantadine first, dopamine agonist when needed, and then levodopa; and Group B, dopamine agonist first and then levodopa when needed. The primary endpoint was the development of dyskinesia, which was analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier survival rate.
Results
A total of 80 patients were enrolled: Group A-1 (n = 27), Group A-2 (n = 27), and Group B (n = 26). Twenty-four patients were excluded from the analysis due to the following: withdrawal of amantadine or dopamine agonist (n = 9), alternative diagnosis (n = 2), withdrawal of consent (n = 1), and breach in the protocol (n = 12). After exclusion, 5 of the 56 (8.93%) patients developed dyskinesia. Patients in Group A-1 and A-2 tended to develop dyskinesia less often than those in Group B (cumulative survival rates of 0.933, 0.929, and 0.700 for A-1, A-2, and B, respectively; p = 0.453).
Conclusion
Amantadine as an initial treatment may decrease the incidence of dyskinesia in patients with drug-naïve PD.
Letter to the editor
Myotonia Congenita Can Be Mistaken as Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia
Aryun Kim, Mihee Jang, Han-Joon Kim, Yoon Kim, Dae-Seong Kim, Jin-Hong Shin, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2018;11(1):49-51.   Published online January 23, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.17056
  • 5,716 View
  • 123 Download
  • 4 Citations
PDF
Case Report
Apparently Ipsilateral Parkinsonism in a Patient with Chronic Subdural Hematoma
Tae Hwan Roh, Dokyung Lee, Il Ki Hong, Deog Yoon Kim, Tae-Beom Ahn
J Mov Disord. 2012;5(1):18-20.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.12005
  • 6,302 View
  • 68 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Symptomatic parkinsonism secondary to ipsilateral lesion is rarely reported. Although the contribution of the contralateral lesions was assumed in some cases, the pathomechanism remains undetermined. Herein we report a patient with a subdural hematoma, who developed parkinsonism in the ipsilateral hemibody. Structural and functional imaging suggests the contralateral dopaminergic dysfunction as the major culprit of apparently ipsilateral parkinsonism.


JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders