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JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders

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4 "Sun Ha Paek"
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Original Articles
Long-Term Outcomes of Deep Brain Stimulation in Pantothenate Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration-Related Dystonia
Kyung Ah Woo, Han-Joon Kim, Seung-Ho Jeon, Hye Ran Park, Kye Won Park, Seung Hyun Lee, Sun Ju Chung, Jong-Hee Chae, Sun Ha Paek, Beomseok Jeon
Received January 6, 2022  Accepted March 29, 2022  Published online July 26, 2022  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22002    [Epub ahead of print]
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
To investigate the long-term clinical outcomes of pallidal deep brain stimulation (GPi-DBS) in patients with pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN).
Methods
We reviewed the records of patients with genetically confirmed PKAN who received bilateral GPi-DBS for refractory dystonia and were clinically followed up for at least 2 years postoperatively at two centers in Korea. Pre- and postoperative Burke– Fahn–Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale motor subscale (BFMDRS-M) scores, disability subscale (BFMDRS-D) scores, and qualitative clinical information were prospectively collected. Descriptive analysis was performed for BFMDRS-M scores, BFMDRSD scores, and the orofacial, axial, and limb subscores of the BFMDRS-M at 6–12, 24–36, and 60–72 months postoperatively.
Results
Five classic-type, four atypical-type, and one unknown-type PKAN cases were identified. The mean preoperative BFMDRS-M score was 92.1 for the classic type and 38.5 for the atypical or unknown type, with a mean BFMDRS follow-up of 50.7 months and a clinical follow-up of 69.0 months. The mean improvements in BFMDRS-M score were 11.3%, 41.3%, and 30.5% at 6–12, 24–36, and 60–72 months, respectively. In four patients with full regular evaluations until 60–72 months, improvements in the orofacial, axial, and limb subscores persisted, but the disability scores worsened from 24–36 months post-operation compared to the baseline, mainly owing to the aggravation of eating and feeding disabilities.
Conclusion
The benefits of GPi-DBS on dystonia may persist for more than 5 years in PKAN. The effects on patients’ subjective disability may have a shorter duration despite improvements in dystonia owing to the complex manifestations of PKAN.
Development of Clinical Milestones in Parkinson’s Disease After Bilateral Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation
Jed Noel A. Ong, Jung Hwan Shin, Seungho Jeon, Chan Young Lee, Han-Joon Kim, Sun Ha Paek, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(2):124-131.   Published online May 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21106
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients does not halt disease progression, as these patients will progress and develop disabling non-levodopa responsive symptoms. These features may act as milestones that represent the overall functionality of patients after DBS. The objective of this study was to investigate the development of clinical milestones in advanced PD patients who underwent bilateral STN-DBS.
Methods
The study evaluated PD patients who underwent STN-DBS at baseline up to their last follow-up using the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale and Hoehn and Yahr scale. The symptoms of hallucinations, dysarthria, dysphagia, frequent falls, difficulty walking, cognitive impairment and the loss of autonomy were chosen as the clinical milestones.
Results
A total of 106 patients with a mean age of 47.21 ± 10.52 years at disease onset, a mean age of 58.72 ± 8.74 years at surgery and a mean disease duration of 11.51 ± 4.4 years before surgery were included. Initial improvement of motor symptoms was seen after the surgery with the appearance of clinical milestones over time. Using the moderately disabling criteria, 81 patients (76.41%) developed at least one clinical milestone, while 48 patients (45.28%) developed a milestone when using the severely disabling criteria.
Conclusion
STN-DBS has a limited effect on axial and nonmotor symptoms of the PD patients, in contrast to the effect on motor symptoms. These symptoms may serve as clinical milestones that can convey the status of PD patients and its impact on the patients and their caregivers. Therefore, advanced PD patients, even those treated with bilateral STN-DBS, will still require assistance and cannot live independently in the long run.
Letter to the editor
Successful Pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation in a Patient with Childhood-Onset Generalized Dystonia with ANO3 Mutation
Dallah Yoo, Han-Joon Kim, Jong-Hee Chae, Sun Ha Paek, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2019;12(3):190-191.   Published online July 17, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.19016
  • 3,875 View
  • 104 Download
  • 5 Citations
PDFSupplementary Material
Review Article
Nonmotor Symptoms and Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson’s Disease
Han-Joon Kim, Beom S. Jeon, Sun Ha Paek
J Mov Disord. 2015;8(2):83-91.   Published online May 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.15010
  • 22,083 View
  • 226 Download
  • 38 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) is an established treatment for the motor symptoms in patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD). In addition to improvements in motor symptoms, many studies have reported changes in various nonmotor symptoms (NMSs) after STN DBS in patients with PD. Psychiatric symptoms, including depression, apathy, anxiety, and impulsivity, can worsen or improve depending on the electrical stimulation parameters, the locations of the stimulating contacts within the STN, and changes in medications after surgery. Global cognitive function is not affected by STN DBS, and there is no increase in the incidence of dementia after STN DBS compared to that after medical treatment, although clinically insignificant declines in verbal fluency have been consistently reported. Pain, especially PD-related pain, improves with STN DBS. Evidence regarding the effects of STN DBS on autonomic symptoms and sleep-related problems is limited and remains conflicting. Many symptoms of nonmotor fluctuations, which are occasionally more troublesome than motor fluctuations, improve with STN DBS. Although it is clear that NMSs are not target symptoms for STN DBS, NMSs have a strong influence on the quality of life of patients with PD, and clinicians should thus be aware of these NMSs when deciding whether to perform surgery and should pay attention to changes in these symptoms after STN DBS to ensure the optimal care for patients.

JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders