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Brief communication
Effectiveness of Exercise on the Sequence Effect in Parkinson’s Disease
Suk Yun Kang, Young Ho Sohn
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(3):213-217.   Published online August 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20045
  • 3,591 View
  • 123 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
To determine the benefits of motor training on the sequence effect (SE), an essential component of bradykinesia in Parkinson’s disease (PD).
Methods
Seven patients with de novo PD participated in this study. The patients performed regular pentagon drawing tests and exercises during four visits. The first two visits occurred before the start of medication, and the last two visits occurred at least six months after the start of medication. We assessed the severity of bradykinesia and SE at each visit and compared the results before and after exercise in both the de novo and treatment conditions.
Results
In the de novo condition, the severity of bradykinesia significantly improved after motor training (p = 0.018), but it did not resolve and only showed a trend of improvement after treatment (p = 0.068). The severity of the SE decreased significantly in the drug-naïve condition (p = 0.028) but not after medication (p = 0.273).
Conclusion
Our study suggests that regular motor training may be beneficial for the SE in PD.
Original Articles
Sleepiness and Depression in Parkinson’s Disease Patients Treated with Ropinirole and Levodopa
Suk Yun Kang, Ho-Sung Ryu, Mun-Kyung Sunwoo, Sang-Jin Kim, Jong-Sam Baik, Mee-Young Park, Hyung-Eun Park, Joong-Seok Kim, Kyum-Yil Kwon, Seong-Beom Koh, Young-Eun Kim, Mi-Kyong Lee, Jong-Min Kim, Sun Ju Chung, Young-Ho Sohn
J Mov Disord. 2017;10(3):123-129.   Published online September 22, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.17048
  • 6,310 View
  • 181 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
We aimed to investigate the effect of ropinirole on excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and depression in Parkinson’s disease (PD) with a large population.
Methods
We conducted a cross-sectional observational study at nine hospitals in Korea between April 24, 2013, and April 22, 2015. We analyzed the demographic and clinical features, other medical history, history of antiparkinsonian medication within 6 months, Hoehn and Yahr stage (HY stage), Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part II and III, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and 30-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-30).
Results
Four-hundred-thirteen patients with PD (mean age: 65.2 ± 9.0 years; men: 227 patients) were analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that age at examination, UPDRS II, and GDS-30 were independent risk factors for EDS and that sex, UPDRS II, and ESS were independent risk factors for depression.
Conclusion
Our large group study did not find any significant associations of ropinirole with EDS and depression in Korean PD patients.
N30 Somatosensory Evoked Potential Is Negatively Correlated with Motor Function in Parkinson’s Disease
Suk Yun Kang, Hyeo-Il Ma
J Mov Disord. 2016;9(1):35-39.   Published online January 25, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.15038
  • 24,050 View
  • 80 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
aaThe aim of this study was to investigate frontal N30 status in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and to examine the correlation between the amplitude of frontal N30 and the severity of motor deficits.
Methods
aaThe frontal N30 was compared between 17 PD patients and 18 healthy volunteers. Correlations between the amplitude of frontal N30 and the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor score of the more severely affected side was examined.
Results
aaThe mean latency of the N30 was not significantly different between patients and healthy volunteers (p = 0.981), but the mean amplitude was lower in PD patients (p < 0.025). There was a significant negative correlation between the amplitude of N30 and the UPDRS motor score (r = -0.715, p = 0.013).
Conclusions
The frontal N30 status indicates the motor severity of PD. It can be a useful biomarker reflecting dopaminergic deficits and an objective measurement for monitoring the clinical severity of PD.
The Sequence Effect in De Novo Parkinson’s Disease
Suk Yun Kang, Toshiaki Wasaka, Ejaz A. Shamim, Sungyoung Auh, Yoshino Ueki, Nguyet Dang, Mark Hallett
J Mov Disord. 2011;4(1):38-40.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.11006
  • 10,662 View
  • 52 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background and Purpose

The sequence effect (SE) in Parkinson’s disease (PD) denotes progressive slowness in speed or progressive decrease in amplitude of repetitive movements. It is a well-known feature of bradykinesia and is considered unique in PD. Until now, it was well-documented in advanced PD, but not in drug-naïve PD. The aim of this study is to know whether the SE can also be measured in drug-naïve PD.

Methods

We measured the SE with a computer-based, modified Purdue pegboard in 4 drug-naïve PD patients, which matched our previous study with advanced PD patients.

Results

We observed progressive slowness during movement, that is, SE. Statistical analysis showed a strong statistical trend toward the SE with the right hand, but no significance with the left hand. There was no statistical significance of SE with either the more or less affected hands.

Conclusions

These results indicate that the SE can be identified in drug-naïve PD, as well as in advanced PD, with objective measurements and support the idea that the SE is a feature in PD observed during the early stage of the disease without medication.

Case Report
Restlessness with Manic Episodes due to Right Parietal Infarction
Suk Yun Kang, Jong Won Paik, Young Ho Sohn
J Mov Disord. 2010;3(1):22-24.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.10007
  • 12,607 View
  • 77 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Mood disorders following acute stroke are relatively common. However, restlessness with manic episodes has rarely been reported. Lesions responsible for post-stroke mania can be located in the thalamus, caudate nucleus, and temporal and frontal lobes. We present a patient who exhibited restlessness with manic episodes after an acute infarction in the right parietal lobe, and summarize the case reports involving post-stroke mania. The right parietal stroke causing mania in our case is a novel observation that may help us to understand the mechanisms underlying restlessness with mania following acute stroke.

Original Article
Unilateral Standing Leg Tremor as the Initial Manifestation of Parkinson Disease
Suk Yun Kang, Sook-Keun Song, Jin-Soo Kim, Young Ho Sohn
J Mov Disord. 2009;2(1):29-32.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.09007
  • 9,981 View
  • 86 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background:

The aim of this study was to analyze the different forms of leg tremors exhibited while standing in patients with Parkinson disease (PD), and to determine if the type of leg tremor exhibited is indicative of prognosis or treatment response in PD patients.

Methods:

We studied the clinical characteristics of five PD patients (all women; mean age, 59 years, range, 53–64 years) with unilateral standing leg tremor as the initial manifestation of PD, including their electrophysiological findings and the results of long-term follow-up.

Results:

For each patient, parkinsonism either existed at the time of onset of the initial symptoms or developed later. Patient responses to drugs were generally good, but one patient showed a poor response to drugs, even though she had only a low frequency leg tremor. For two patients whom we could observe during the 10-year follow-up period, neither the leg tremor nor parkinsonism was aggravated.

Conclusions:

There are two forms of unilateral standing leg tremor in PD. One form is high frequency, similar to the primary orthostatic tremor. The other is low frequency and similar to the parkinsonian resting tremor. Based on these observations, it appears that progression might be slow if PD patients have standing leg tremor as the initial manifestation.


JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders