Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
21 "Seong-Beom Koh"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles
Brief communication
Evaluating the validity and reliability of the Korean version of Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson’s Disease–Cognition
Jinse Park, Eung Seok Oh, Seong-Beom Koh, In-Uk Song, Tae-Beom Ahn, Sang Jin Kim, Sang-Myung Cheon, Yun Joong Kim, Jin Whan Cho, Hyeo-Il Ma, Mee-Young Park, Jong Sam Baik, Phil Hyu Lee, Sun Ju Chung, Jong-Min Kim, Han-Joon Kim, Young-Hee Sung, Do Young Kwon, Jae-Hyeok Lee, Jee-Young Lee, Ji Sun Kim, Ji Young Yun, Hee Jin Kim, Jin Young Hong, Mi-Jung Kim, Jinyoung Youn, Ji Seon Kim, Hui-Jun Yang, Won Tae Yoon, Sooyeoun You, Kyum-Yil Kwon, Su-Yun Lee, Younsoo Kim, Hee-Tae Kim, Joong-Seok Kim, Ji-Young Kim
Received March 8, 2024  Accepted April 2, 2024  Published online April 3, 2024  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.24061    [Accepted]
  • 508 View
  • 24 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
The Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson’s Disease–Cognition (SCOPA-Cog) was developed to screen for cognition in PD. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the validity and reliability of the Korean version of the SCOPA-cog.
Methods
We recruited 129 PD patients from 31 clinics with movement disorders in South Korea. The original version of the SCOPA-cognition was translated into Korean using the translation-retranslation method. The test-rest method with an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Cronbach’s alpha coefficient were used to assess reliability. The Spearman’s Rank correlation analysis with Montreal Cognitive Assessment-Korean version (MOCA-K) and Korean Mini-Mental State Examination (K-MMSE) were used to assess concurrent validity.
Results
The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was 0.797, and the ICC was 0.887. Spearman’s rank correlation analysis showed a significant correlation with the K-MMSE and MOCA-K scores (r = 0.546 and r = 0.683, respectively).
Conclusions
Our results demonstrate that K-SCOPA-Cog exhibits good reliability and validity.
Viewpoint
A Practical Guide for Clinical Approach to Patients With Huntington’s Disease in Korea
Chaewon Shin, Ryul Kim, Dallah Yoo, Eungseok Oh, Jangsup Moon, Minkyeong Kim, Jee-Young Lee, Jong-Min Kim, Seong-Beom Koh, Manho Kim, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2024;17(2):138-149.   Published online March 12, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.24040
  • 972 View
  • 62 Download
  • 2 Comments
PDF
Original Articles
Hair Loss: A Well-Known Yet Understudied Symptom in Parkinson’s Disease Patients During Dopaminergic Therapy
Jungyeun Lee, Hwa Jung Ryu, Soon Young Hwang, Seong-Beom Koh
J Mov Disord. 2024;17(1):47-54.   Published online September 26, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.23088
  • 1,209 View
  • 114 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Hair loss has been reported to occur during dopaminergic therapy in patients with Parkinson’s disease. The mechanism by which dopaminergic therapy induces hair loss is not well understood. Dopamine receptors are present in the hair follicle, where they regulate melanin production. However, the role of dopamine receptors in hair growth is still not well understood. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of hair loss and identify factors associated with complaints of hair loss in patients with Parkinson’s disease.
Methods
A cross-sectional design involving 495 Parkinson’s disease patients was applied to evaluate hair loss status. Patients completed a questionnaire, and scalp/hair examinations were performed. Patients with underlying conditions that could affect hair loss and those prescribed medications known to increase the risk of hair loss were excluded. Finally, 291 patients (58.8%) were included for analysis.
Results
Among the 495 patients, 138 (27.9%) reported hair loss. Interestingly, more than half of the patients who complained of hair loss (79 out of 138) did not utilize treatments such as hair products, massage, dietary modifications, or alopecia medications. Hair inspection by a single investigator revealed objective hair loss in 263 patients (53.1%). An analysis of factors associated with hair loss complaints showed that the intake of dopaminergic medications with a levodopa-equivalent daily dose > 448 mg was associated with complaints of hair loss.
Conclusion
Dopaminergic medication is associated with hair loss complaints in Parkinson’s disease patients.
Caregiver Burden of Patients With Huntington’s Disease in South Korea
Chan Young Lee, Chaewon Shin, Yun Su Hwang, Eungseok Oh, Manho Kim, Hyun Sook Kim, Sun Ju Chung, Young Hee Sung, Won Tae Yoon, Jin Whan Cho, Jae-Hyeok Lee, Han-Joon Kim, Hee Jin Chang, Beomseok Jeon, Kyung Ah Woo, Seong-Beom Koh, Kyum-Yil Kwon, Jangsup Moon, Young Eun Kim, Jee-Young Lee
J Mov Disord. 2024;17(1):30-37.   Published online September 11, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.23134
  • 2,220 View
  • 179 Download
  • 1 Crossref
  • 1 Comments
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
This is the first prospective cohort study of Huntington’s disease (HD) in Korea. This study aimed to investigate the caregiver burden in relation to the characteristics of patients and caregivers.
Methods
From August 2020 to February 2022, we enrolled patients with HD from 13 university hospitals in Korea. We used the 12-item Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI-12) to evaluate the caregiver burden. We evaluated the clinical associations of the ZBI-12 scores by linear regression analysis and investigated the differences between the low- and high-burden groups.
Results
Sixty-five patients with HD and 45 caregivers were enrolled in this cohort study. The average age at onset of motor symptoms was 49.3 ± 12.3 years, with an average cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG)n of 42.9 ± 4.0 (38–65). The median ZBI-12 score among our caregivers was 17.6 ± 14.2. A higher caregiver burden was associated with a more severe Shoulson–Fahn stage (p = 0.038) of the patients. A higher ZBI-12 score was also associated with lower independence scale (B = -0.154, p = 0.006) and functional capacity (B = -1.082, p = 0.002) scores of patients. The caregiving duration was longer in the high- than in the low-burden group. Caregivers’ demographics, blood relation, and marital and social status did not affect the burden significantly.
Conclusion
HD patients’ neurological status exerts an enormous impact on the caregiver burden regardless of the demographic or social status of the caregiver. This study emphasizes the need to establish an optimal support system for families dealing with HD in Korea. A future longitudinal analysis could help us understand how disease progression aggravates the caregiver burden throughout the entire disease course.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A Practical Guide for Clinical Approach to Patients With Huntington’s Disease in Korea
    Chaewon Shin, Ryul Kim, Dallah Yoo, Eungseok Oh, Jangsup Moon, Minkyeong Kim, Jee-Young Lee, Jong-Min Kim, Seong-Beom Koh, Manho Kim, Beomseok Jeon
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2024; 17(2): 138.     CrossRef
Brief communication
Validity and Reliability of the Korean-Translated Version of the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale in Cerebellar Ataxia
Jinse Park, Jin Whan Cho, Jinyoung Youn, Engseok Oh, Wooyoung Jang, Joong-Seok Kim, Yoon-Sang Oh, Hyungyoung Hwang, Chang-Hwan Ryu, Jin-Young Ahn, Jee-Young Lee, Seong-Beom Koh, Jae H. Park, Hee-Tae Kim
J Mov Disord. 2023;16(1):86-90.   Published online December 20, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22137
  • 1,579 View
  • 92 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
The International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS) is a semiquantitative clinical scale for ataxia that is widely used in numerous countries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the validity and reliability of the Korean-translated version of the ICARS.
Methods
Eighty-eight patients who presented with cerebellar ataxia were enrolled. We investigated the construct validity using exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). We also investigated the internal consistency using Cronbach’s α and intrarater and interrater reliability using intraclass correlation coefficients.
Results
The Korean-translated ICARS showed satisfactory construct validity using EFA and CFA. It also revealed good interrater and intrarater reliability and showed acceptable internal consistency. However, subscale 4 for assessing oculomotor disorder showed moderate internal consistency.
Conclusion
This is the first report to investigate the validity and reliability of the Korean-translated ICARS. Our results showed excellent construct and convergent validity. The reliability is also acceptable.
Original Article
Constipation is Associated With Mild Cognitive Impairment in Patients With de novo Parkinson’s Disease
Sung Hoon Kang, Jungyeun Lee, Seong-Beom Koh
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(1):38-42.   Published online November 17, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21074
  • 4,333 View
  • 317 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
The association between gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and cognitive profile in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) at diagnosis remains unclear, although GI symptoms and cognitive impairment are highly prevalent in patients with PD. We investigated the relationship between constipation and cognitive status. We also aimed to identify the correlation between constipation and each neuropsychological dysfunction.
Methods
A total of 427 patients with de novo Parkinson’s disease with normal cognition (PD-NC, n = 170) and Parkinson’s disease with mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI, n = 257) at Korea University Guro Hospital in Seoul, Korea were included. All patients underwent comprehensive neuropsychological tests and completed the Non-Motor Symptoms Scale (NMSS). The frequency and severity of constipation were assessed using the NMSS GI symptoms scale, we used logistic regression analysis and partial correlation analysis to determine the associations between constipation score, MCI, and each neuropsychological dysfunction.
Results
Frequent and severe constipation was associated with MCI in patients with PD at diagnosis regardless of disease severity. Specifically, constipation was related to poor performance in frontal-executive and visuospatial functions after controlling for age and sex.
Conclusion
Our findings may provide an understanding of constipation as a marker associated with cognitive impairment in individuals with PD. Therefore, the evaluation of cognitive function is warranted in PD patients with constipation, while further studies are necessary to investigate the detailed mechanism of our results.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Defecation after magnesium supplementation enhances cognitive performance in triathletes
    Chen-Chan Wei, M. Brennan Harris, Mengxin Ye, Andrew Nicholls, Ahmad Alkhatib, Luthfia Dewi, Chi-Yang Huang, Chia-Hua Kuo
    Sports Medicine and Health Science.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Constipation in Parkinson's Disease
    Eamonn M. M. Quigley
    Seminars in Neurology.2023; 43(04): 562.     CrossRef
  • Interactions between gut microbiota and Parkinson's disease: The role of microbiota-derived amino acid metabolism
    Wang Wang, Shujun Jiang, Chengcheng Xu, Lili Tang, Yan Liang, Yang Zhao, Guoxue Zhu
    Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Brief communication
Dance Intervention Using the Feldenkrais Method Improves Motor, and Non-Motor Symptoms and Gait in Parkinson’s Disease: A 12-Month Study
Sung Hoon Kang, Jinhee Kim, Ilsoo Kim, Young Ae Moon, Sojung Park, Seong-Beom Koh
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(1):53-57.   Published online November 3, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21086
  • 4,392 View
  • 381 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
The aim of this study was to assess the effects of dancing (using the Feldenkrais method) on motor and non-motor symptoms, quality of life (QoL), and objective parameters of gait at the time of intervention and at the end of the 1-year study period.
Methods
This was a single-arm study in which 12 subjects with Parkinson’s disease (PD) received dance intervention during a 6-month period. Objective motor scales, gait analysis, and questionnaires on non-motor symptoms were evaluated at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months.
Results
Dance intervention decreased motor scale (Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale and Tinetti scale) scores and improved gait disturbance (gait velocity and step length) without increasing levodopa equivalent dose. Furthermore, dancing decreased non-motor scale (Non-Motor Symptoms Scale and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale) scores and improved QoL.
Conclusion
Our findings suggest that dance intervention can be a complementary management method for PD patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Mild cognitive impairment is associated with poor gait performance in patients with Parkinson’s disease
    Sung Hoon Kang, Jinhee Kim, Jungyeun Lee, Seong-Beom Koh
    Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Articles
The Four Square Step Test for Assessing Cognitively Demanding Dynamic Balance in Parkinson’s Disease Patients
Jinhee Kim, Ilsoo Kim, Ye Eun Kim, Seong-Beom Koh
J Mov Disord. 2021;14(3):208-213.   Published online May 26, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20146
  • 4,831 View
  • 161 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
The Four Square Step Test (FSST) is a tool that assesses dynamic balance during obstacle step-over. To date, few studies have used the FSST to measure balance in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). This study aimed to verify that patients with PD, even at the de novo early stage, take more time to perform the FSST and identify which factors, cognitive status or cardinal motor symptoms, are related most to FSST scores.
Methods
Thirty-five newly diagnosed drug-naïve patients with PD and 17 controls completed the FSST. The Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) stage, spatiotemporal gait parameters, and neuropsychological test battery were also assessed in the PD group.
Results
Mean FSST performance time was 8.20 ± 1.61 seconds in patients with PD, which was significantly more than the control group (7.13 ± 1.10 seconds, p = 0.018). UPDRS part III total score and H&Y stage were not significantly associated with FSST, but among the UPDRS subscores, only the postural instability/gait disturbance subscore showed a significant association. Regarding the association between FSST and cognition, the Trail Making Test-B and the Color Word Stroop Test showed strongly inverse correlations with FSST (rho = -0.598 and -0.590, respectively). With respect to gait parameters, double support time was significantly associated with FSST score (rho = 0.342, p = 0.044); however, other parameters, including velocity and step length, were not associated with the FSST.
Conclusion
The FSST can be used in the clinic to assess dynamic balance with cognitive demands even in the early stages of PD.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Impact of mobile phone usage on dynamic postural control among South Indian college students
    S. Dhanusia, S. Santhana Lakshmi, Ajith Kumar, R. Prabhu, Vignesh Srinivasan, Prathap Suganthirababu, Priyadharshini Kumar, A. Kumaresan, Surya Vishnuram, Jagatheesan Alagesan, Rajkumar Krishnan Vasanthi
    Work.2024; : 1.     CrossRef
  • A Computer Vision-Based System to Help Health Professionals to Apply Tests for Fall Risk Assessment
    Jesús Damián Blasco-García, Gabriel García-López, Marta Jiménez-Muñoz, Juan Antonio López-Riquelme, Jorge Juan Feliu-Batlle, Nieves Pavón-Pulido, María-Trinidad Herrero
    Sensors.2024; 24(6): 2015.     CrossRef
  • 2023 Carol B. Lewis Distinguished Lecture Address to the APTA Geriatrics Membership Combined Sections Meeting, February 23, 2023 Key Words & Challenges: Defining Our Role in Caring for Older Adults
    Michelle M. Lusardi
    Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy.2023; 46(2): 93.     CrossRef
  • The relationship between visual function and physical performance in the Study of Muscle, Mobility and Aging (SOMMA)
    Atalie C. Thompson, Eileen Johnson, Michael E. Miller, Jeff D. Williamson, Anne B. Newman, Steve Cummings, Peggy Cawthon, Stephen B. Kritchevsky, Eric R. Anson
    PLOS ONE.2023; 18(9): e0292079.     CrossRef
  • Relationship between parental history of dementia, motor-cognitive and executive function performance in African American women
    Allison A. Bay, Nicole Schindler, Whitney Wharton, Hayley Silverstein, Liang Ni, Todd A. Prusin, Madeleine E. Hackney
    Journal of the Neurological Sciences.2022; 439: 120305.     CrossRef
Clinical Characteristics of Involuntary Movement in Hospitalized Patients
Kyum-Yil Kwon, Hye Mi Lee, Seon-Min Lee, Seong-Beom Koh
J Mov Disord. 2019;12(1):31-36.   Published online December 20, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18040
  • 6,974 View
  • 205 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Neurological symptoms in hospitalized patients are not rare, and neurological consultation for movement disorders is especially important in evaluating or managing those with various movement disorders. Therefore, we investigated a clinical pattern of in-hospital consultations for various movement disorders in a tertiary care university hospital.
Methods
Over two years, a total of 202 patients (70.7 ± 11.8 years of age) presenting with movement disorders referred to movement disorder specialists were investigated.
Results
The main symptoms referred by nonneurologists were tremor (56.9%), parkinsonism (16.8%), and gait disturbance (8.9%). The most frequent diagnostic category was toxic/metabolic-caused movement disorder (T/MCMD) (35%) with regard to medications, followed by Parkinson’s disease (PD) (16%). Regarding the mode of onset, T/MCMD was the leading cause for acute (68%) and subacute onset (46%), while PD was the leading disorder (31%) for chronic onset.
Conclusion
The current study showed a characteristic pattern of inpatients presenting with movement disorders. Furthermore, our findings highlighted the clinical significance of drug use or metabolic problems for treating this patient population.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Pattern and frequency of involuntary movements: hospital-based study
    H. N. El Tallawy, A. S. Shalash, M. A. Abdelhamed, R. E. Elsabrout
    The Egyptian Journal of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Clinical Spectrum of Movement Disorders in Neurology Inpatients in a Tertiary Care Centre
    Shabeer Ahmad Paul, Gouranga Prasad Mondal, Ramesh Bhattacharyya, Kartik Chandra Ghosh, Sarbajit Das, Suman Das, Hema Krishna, Chandrakanta Patra
    Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice.2021; 12: 581.     CrossRef
Validity and Reliability Study of the Korean Tinetti Mobility Test for Parkinson’s Disease
Jinse Park, Seong-Beom Koh, Hee Jin Kim, Eungseok Oh, Joong-Seok Kim, Ji Young Yun, Do-Young Kwon, Younsoo Kim, Ji Seon Kim, Kyum-Yil Kwon, Jeong-Ho Park, Jinyoung Youn, Wooyoung Jang
J Mov Disord. 2018;11(1):24-29.   Published online January 23, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.17058
  • 11,223 View
  • 264 Download
  • 14 Web of Science
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Postural instability and gait disturbance are the cardinal symptoms associated with falling among patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). The Tinetti mobility test (TMT) is a well-established measurement tool used to predict falls among elderly people. However, the TMT has not been established or widely used among PD patients in Korea. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Korean version of the TMT for PD patients.
Methods
Twenty-four patients diagnosed with PD were enrolled in this study. For the interrater reliability test, thirteen clinicians scored the TMT after watching a video clip. We also used the test-retest method to determine intrarater reliability. For concurrent validation, the unified Parkinson’s disease rating scale, Hoehn and Yahr staging, Berg Balance Scale, Timed-Up and Go test, 10-m walk test, and gait analysis by three-dimensional motion capture were also used. We analyzed receiver operating characteristic curve to predict falling.
Results
The interrater reliability and intrarater reliability of the Korean Tinetti balance scale were 0.97 and 0.98, respectively. The interrater reliability and intra-rater reliability of the Korean Tinetti gait scale were 0.94 and 0.96, respectively. The Korean TMT scores were significantly correlated with the other clinical scales and three-dimensional motion capture. The cutoff values for predicting falling were 14 points (balance subscale) and 10 points (gait subscale).
Conclusion
We found that the Korean version of the TMT showed excellent validity and reliability for gait and balance and had high sensitivity and specificity for predicting falls among patients with PD.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Validity and Reliability of the Korean-Translated Version of the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale in Cerebellar Ataxia
    Jinse Park, Jin Whan Cho, Jinyoung Youn, Engseok Oh, Wooyoung Jang, Joong-Seok Kim, Yoon-Sang Oh, Hyungyoung Hwang, Chang-Hwan Ryu, Jin-Young Ahn, Jee-Young Lee, Seong-Beom Koh, Jae H. Park, Hee-Tae Kim
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2023; 16(1): 86.     CrossRef
  • Reliability and validity of the Tinetti performance oriented mobility assessment in Chinese community-dwelling older adults
    Chen Yang, Yihan Mo, Xi Cao, Song Zhu, Xiuhua Wang, Xiaoqing Wang
    Geriatric Nursing.2023; 53: 85.     CrossRef
  • Validation of the Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment (Tinetti Test) Scale in Russia for Stroke Patients
    Elena V. Kostenko, Liudmila V. Petrova, Irena V. Pogonchenkova
    Bulletin of Rehabilitation Medicine.2023; 22(3): 29.     CrossRef
  • Dance Intervention Using the Feldenkrais Method Improves Motor, and Non-Motor Symptoms and Gait in Parkinson’s Disease: A 12-Month Study
    Sung Hoon Kang, Jinhee Kim, Ilsoo Kim, Young Ae Moon, Sojung Park, Seong-Beom Koh
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2022; 15(1): 53.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of Anticipatory Postural Adjustment before Quantified Weight Shifting—System Development and Reliability Test
    Jiunn-Woei Liaw, Rou-Shayn Chen, Vincent Chiun-Fan Chen, Yan-Ru Wang, Hsiao-Lung Chan, Ya-Ju Chang
    Applied Sciences.2021; 11(2): 758.     CrossRef
  • Use of Standardized and Non-Standardized Tools for Measuring the Risk of Falls and Independence in Clinical Practice
    Jan Neugebauer, Valérie Tóthová, Jitka Doležalová
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(6): 3226.     CrossRef
  • Decreased foot height may be a subclinical shuffling gait in early stage of Parkinson’s disease: A study of three-dimensional motion analysis
    Kyong Jin Shin, Jinse Park, Samyeol Ha, Kang Min Park, Sung Eun Kim, Byung In Lee, Dong Ah Lee, Hee-Tae Kim, Ji-Yeon Yoon
    Gait & Posture.2020; 76: 64.     CrossRef
  • Design of a Machine Learning-Assisted Wearable Accelerometer-Based Automated System for Studying the Effect of Dopaminergic Medicine on Gait Characteristics of Parkinson’s Patients
    Satyabrata Aich, Pyari Mohan Pradhan, Sabyasachi Chakraborty, Hee-Cheol Kim, Hee-Tae Kim, Hae-Gu Lee, Il Hwan Kim, Moon-il Joo, Sim Jong Seong, Jinse Park
    Journal of Healthcare Engineering.2020; 2020: 1.     CrossRef
  • Psychometric properties and domains of postural control tests for individuals with knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review
    Helen P. French, Charlotte K. Hager, Anne Venience, Ryan Fagan, Dara Meldrum
    International Journal of Rehabilitation Research.2020; 43(2): 102.     CrossRef
  • Measures of balance and falls risk prediction in people with Parkinson’s disease: a systematic review of psychometric properties
    Stanley J Winser, Priya Kannan, Umar Muhhamad Bello, Susan L Whitney
    Clinical Rehabilitation.2019; 33(12): 1949.     CrossRef
  • Allelic variant in SLC6A3 rs393795 affects cerebral regional homogeneity and gait dysfunction in patients with Parkinson’s disease
    Lina Wang, Yongsheng Yuan, Jianwei Wang, Yuting Shen, Yan Zhi, Junyi Li, Min Wang, Kezhong Zhang
    PeerJ.2019; 7: e7957.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of Balance Disorders in Parkinson's Disease Using Simple Diagnostic Tests—Not So Simple to Choose
    Karolina Krzysztoń, Jakub Stolarski, Jan Kochanowski
    Frontiers in Neurology.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Rasch Analysis of the Clinimetric Properties of the Korean Dizziness Handicap Inventory in Patients with Parkinson Disease
    Da-Young Lee, Hui-Jun Yang, Dong-Seok Yang, Jin-Hyuk Choi, Byoung-Soo Park, Ji-Yun Park
    Research in Vestibular Science.2018; 17(4): 152.     CrossRef
Patients and Their Caregivers’ Burdens for Parkinson’s Disease in Korea
Jong Sam Baik, Joong-Seok Kim, Seong-Beom Koh, Jin Whan Cho, Phil Hyu Lee, Hyeo-Il Ma, Yun Joong Kim, Tae-Beom Ahn, Sang Jin Kim, Yong Duk Kim, Seong-min Choi, Ho-Won Lee, Hee Tae Kim
J Mov Disord. 2017;10(3):109-115.   Published online September 22, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.17053
  • 7,219 View
  • 225 Download
  • 11 Web of Science
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Many patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) suffer from motor and non-motor symptoms. According to these variable symptoms of PD, patients or caregivers have a poorer quality of life than patients with other neurodegenerative diseases. Since the difficulties are varied for all patients, prioritizing their difficulties differs among all cases. The goal of this study was to investigate the burdens of PD among the caregivers as well as patients and to identify areas requiring aid from the government.
Methods
We surveyed the awareness and perceptions of PD in patients and caregivers of PD by a face-to-face questionnaire. The questionnaire was divided into three sections: symptoms of PD (part A), desire for policies (part B), and difficulties faced by their caregivers (part C). Part A comprised 8 questions, Part B had 2 questions, and Part C had 3 questions.
Results
In total, 853 subjects (702 patients and 151 caregivers) were enrolled in this study. The major difficulties experienced by PD patients were physical (67%), psychiatric (60%) and socio-economic (52%). Assessing the physical difficulties, more than half the patients experienced severe difficulties (29% very severe, 39% severe). Psychiatric difficulties were assessed as severe (35%) and very severe (21%) among the patients. Severe difficulties were also experienced socio-economically, at 52% in patients and 49% in caregivers, especially among patients in their fifties (58%) and those with their spouse (65%) as caregivers. The topmost need was the introduction of new technology for treatment of PD (62%), followed by relief of costs for treatment (38%) and a family support system (31%). The majority (91%) of the patients were diagnosed with PD within two years after onset of symptoms.
Conclusion
We know that the difficulties of PD and the needs for government assistance are different between patients and caregivers. These results emphasize that perceiving the difficulties and needs of patients and caregivers early can help to prevent and ameliorate the burden of disease.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Challenges in Parkinson’s Disease Care—In Light of the COVID-19 Pandemic
    Kyung Ah Woo, Han-Joon Kim, Beomseok Jeon
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2023; 16(1): 52.     CrossRef
  • Efficacy and safety of a combination of emotional freedom technique with acupuncture versus acupuncture alone to treat psychiatric symptoms in Parkinson’s disease: A protocol for a randomized, assessor-blind, parallel-group clinical trial
    Dong-Hoon Kang, Ju-Yeon Kim, Yang-Chun Park, Ho-Ryong Yoo, In Chul Jung
    Medicine.2023; 102(21): e33714.     CrossRef
  • Exploring Unmet Information Needs of People with Parkinson’s Disease and Their Families: Focusing on Information Sharing in an Online Patient Community
    Hyeon Sik Chu, Hye Young Jang
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(5): 2521.     CrossRef
  • Participants' perspective on a COVID-19 online vocal group stimulation for people with Parkinson's disease
    Marie-Christine Hallé, Charline Delorme, Édith Coulombe, Ouswa Rekik, Ingrid Verduyckt
    Frontiers in Rehabilitation Sciences.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Group singing improves quality of life for people with Parkinson’s: an international study
    J. Yoon Irons, Grenville Hancox, Trish Vella-Burrows, Eun-Young Han, Hyun-Ju Chong, David Sheffield, Donald E. Stewart
    Aging & Mental Health.2021; 25(4): 650.     CrossRef
  • Exploring the perceptions and stigmatizing experiences of Israeli family caregivers of people with Parkinson's disease
    Hanan AboJabel, Einat Argavan, Sharon Hassin-Baer, Rivka Inzelberg, Perla Werner
    Journal of Aging Studies.2021; 56: 100910.     CrossRef
  • Perceived online social support for Parkinson’s disease patients: The role of support type, uncertainty, contentment, and psychological quality of life
    Surin Chung, Eunjin (Anna) Kim, J. Brian Houston
    Communication Quarterly.2021; 69(3): 259.     CrossRef
  • Delivering patient-centered care in Parkinson's disease: Challenges and consensus from an international panel
    Roongroj Bhidayasiri, Pattamon Panyakaew, Claudia Trenkwalder, Beomseok Jeon, Nobutaka Hattori, Priya Jagota, Yih-Ru Wu, Elena Moro, Shen-Yang Lim, Huifang Shang, Raymond Rosales, Jee-Young Lee, Win Min Thit, Eng-King Tan, Thien Thien Lim, Ngoc Tai Tran,
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2020; 72: 82.     CrossRef
  • Understanding patients’ and caregivers’ perspectives and educational needs in Parkinson’s disease: a multi-ethnic Asian study
    Xing Yan Choo, Shen-Yang Lim, Karuthan Chinna, Yan Jing Tan, Voon Wei Yong, Jia Lun Lim, Kar Foo Lau, Jing Yi Chung, Jun Min Em, Hui Ting Tan, Jia Hwa Lim, Seng Beng Tan, Chong Tin Tan, Ai Huey Tan
    Neurological Sciences.2020; 41(10): 2831.     CrossRef
  • Nörolojik Hastalık ve Evlilik
    Mehmet ÖNGER, Tuba AYDIN
    Sakarya Medical Journal.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The burden of care and the understanding of disease in Parkinson’s disease
    Geum-Bong Lee, Hyunhee Woo, Su-Yoon Lee, Sang-Myung Cheon, Jae Woo Kim, Oscar Arias-Carrion
    PLOS ONE.2019; 14(5): e0217581.     CrossRef
Sleepiness and Depression in Parkinson’s Disease Patients Treated with Ropinirole and Levodopa
Suk Yun Kang, Ho-Sung Ryu, Mun-Kyung Sunwoo, Sang-Jin Kim, Jong-Sam Baik, Mee-Young Park, Hyung-Eun Park, Joong-Seok Kim, Kyum-Yil Kwon, Seong-Beom Koh, Young-Eun Kim, Mi-Kyong Lee, Jong-Min Kim, Sun Ju Chung, Young-Ho Sohn
J Mov Disord. 2017;10(3):123-129.   Published online September 22, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.17048
  • 9,187 View
  • 191 Download
  • 12 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
We aimed to investigate the effect of ropinirole on excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and depression in Parkinson’s disease (PD) with a large population.
Methods
We conducted a cross-sectional observational study at nine hospitals in Korea between April 24, 2013, and April 22, 2015. We analyzed the demographic and clinical features, other medical history, history of antiparkinsonian medication within 6 months, Hoehn and Yahr stage (HY stage), Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part II and III, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and 30-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-30).
Results
Four-hundred-thirteen patients with PD (mean age: 65.2 ± 9.0 years; men: 227 patients) were analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that age at examination, UPDRS II, and GDS-30 were independent risk factors for EDS and that sex, UPDRS II, and ESS were independent risk factors for depression.
Conclusion
Our large group study did not find any significant associations of ropinirole with EDS and depression in Korean PD patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Associations between non-motor symptoms and patient characteristics in Parkinson’s disease: a multicenter cross-sectional study
    Remi Morimoto, Mutsumi Iijima, Yasuyuki Okuma, Keisuke Suzuki, Fumihito Yoshii, Shigeru Nogawa, Takashi Osada, Kazuo Kitagawa
    Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Excessive Daytime Sleepiness in Parkinson’s Disease
    Hanshu Liu, Jingwen Li, Xinyi Wang, Jinsha Huang, Tao Wang, Zhicheng Lin, Nian Xiong
    Nature and Science of Sleep.2022; Volume 14: 1589.     CrossRef
  • Excessive daytime sleepiness in Parkinson's disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Fei Feng, YingYing Cai, YanBing Hou, Ruwei Ou, Zheng Jiang, HuiFang Shang
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2021; 85: 133.     CrossRef
  • Sleep Disorders and Cognitive Dysfunctions in Parkinson’s Disease: A Meta-Analytic Study
    Gianpaolo Maggi, Luigi Trojano, Paolo Barone, Gabriella Santangelo
    Neuropsychology Review.2021; 31(4): 643.     CrossRef
  • Longitudinal risk factors for developing depressive symptoms in Parkinson's disease
    Tarek Antar, Huw R. Morris, Faraz Faghri, Hampton L. Leonard, Mike A. Nalls, Andrew B. Singleton, Hirotaka Iwaki
    Journal of the Neurological Sciences.2021; 429: 117615.     CrossRef
  • The effect and safety of ropinirole in the treatment of Parkinson disease
    Jiali Zhu, Min Chen
    Medicine.2021; 100(46): e27653.     CrossRef
  • Pramipexole regulates depression-like behavior via dopamine D3 receptor in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease
    Shi-Zhuang Wei, Xiao-Yu Yao, Chen-Tao Wang, An-Qi Dong, Dan Li, Yu-Ting Zhang, Chao Ren, Jin-Bao Zhang, Cheng-Jie Mao, Fen Wang, Chun-Feng Liu
    Brain Research Bulletin.2021; 177: 363.     CrossRef
  • A selective D2 dopamine receptor agonist alleviates depression through up-regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase and increased neurogenesis in hippocampus of the prenatally stressed rats
    Mahino Fatima, Mir Hilal Ahmad, Saurabh Srivastav, Moshahid Alam Rizvi, A.C. Mondal
    Neurochemistry International.2020; 136: 104730.     CrossRef
  • ‘Dopamine agonist Phobia’ in Parkinson’s disease: when does it matter? Implications for non-motor symptoms and personalized medicine
    Silvia Rota, Iro Boura, Lucia Batzu, Nataliya Titova, Peter Jenner, Cristian Falup-Pecurariu, K Ray Chaudhuri
    Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics.2020; 20(9): 953.     CrossRef
  • An Investigation on the Clinical Features and Neurochemical Changes in Parkinson's Disease With Depression
    Teng-Hong Lian, Peng Guo, Li-Jun Zuo, Yang Hu, Shu-Yang Yu, Li Liu, Zhao Jin, Qiu-Jin Yu, Rui-Dan Wang, Li-Xia Li, Ying-Shan Piao, Wei Zhang
    Frontiers in Psychiatry.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
Quantitative Gait Analysis in Patients with Huntington’s Disease
Seon Jong Pyo, Hanjun Kim, Il Soo Kim, Young-Min Park, Mi-Jung Kim, Hye Mi Lee, Seong-Beom Koh
J Mov Disord. 2017;10(3):140-144.   Published online August 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.17041
  • 7,307 View
  • 141 Download
  • 17 Web of Science
  • 19 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Gait disturbance is the main factor contributing to a negative impact on quality of life in patients with Huntington’s disease (HD). Understanding gait features in patients with HD is essential for planning a successful gait strategy. The aim of this study was to investigate temporospatial gait parameters in patients with HD compared with healthy controls.
Methods
We investigated 7 patients with HD. Diagnosis was confirmed by genetic analysis, and patients were evaluated with the Unified Huntington’s Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS). Gait features were assessed with a gait analyzer. We compared the results of patients with HD to those of 7 age- and sex-matched normal controls.
Results
Step length and stride length were decreased and base of support was increased in the HD group compared to the control group. In addition, coefficients of variability for step and stride length were increased in the HD group. The HD group showed slower walking velocity, an increased stance/swing phase in the gait cycle and a decreased proportion of single support time compared to the control group. Cadence did not differ significantly between groups. Among the UHDRS subscores, total motor score and total behavior score were positively correlated with step length, and total behavior score was positively correlated with walking velocity in patients with HD.
Conclusion
Increased variability in step and stride length, slower walking velocity, increased stance phase, and decreased swing phase and single support time with preserved cadence suggest that HD gait patterns are slow, ataxic and ineffective. This study suggests that quantitative gait analysis is needed to assess gait problems in HD.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Sensor-Based Locomotion Data Mining for Supporting the Diagnosis of Neurodegenerative Disorders: A Survey
    Samaneh Zolfaghari, Sumaiya Suravee, Daniele Riboni, Kristina Yordanova
    ACM Computing Surveys.2024; 56(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • The semicircular canal function is preserved with little impact on falls in patients with mild Parkinson's disease
    Jun-Pyo Hong, Hanim Kwon, Euyhyun Park, Sun-Uk Lee, Chan-Nyoung Lee, Byung-Jo Kim, Ji-Soo Kim, Kun-Woo Park
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2024; 118: 105933.     CrossRef
  • Gene-dosage- and sex-dependent differences in the prodromal-Like phase of the F344tgHD rat model for Huntington disease
    Veronika Ratz-Wirsching, Johanna Habermeyer, Sandra Moceri, Julia Harrer, Christoph Schmitz, Stephan von Hörsten
    Frontiers in Neuroscience.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Vision-Based Motion Capture for the Gait Analysis of Neurodegenerative Diseases: A Review
    David Vun Sing Yee, Robert Bowers, Anthony McGarry
    Gait & Posture.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Wearable sensors and features for diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases: A systematic review
    Huan Zhao, Junyi Cao, Junxiao Xie, Wei-Hsin Liao, Yaguo Lei, Hongmei Cao, Qiumin Qu, Chris Bowen
    DIGITAL HEALTH.2023; 9: 205520762311735.     CrossRef
  • Spatiotemporal Gait Parameters in Adults With Premanifest and Manifest Huntington’s Disease: A Systematic Review
    Sasha Browning, Stephanie Holland, Ian Wellwood, Belinda Bilney
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2023; 16(3): 307.     CrossRef
  • Walking pattern analysis using GAIT cycles and silhouettes for clinical applications
    S.M.H. Sithi Shameem Fathima, K.A. Jyotsna, Thiruveedula Srinivasulu, Kande Archana, M. Tulasi rama, S. Ravichand
    Measurement: Sensors.2023; 30: 100893.     CrossRef
  • Human Gait Analysis in Neurodegenerative Diseases: A Review
    Grazia Cicirelli, Donato Impedovo, Vincenzo Dentamaro, Roberto Marani, Giuseppe Pirlo, Tiziana R. D'Orazio
    IEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics.2022; 26(1): 229.     CrossRef
  • Development of Neuro-Degenerative Diseases’ Gait Classification Algorithm Using Convolutional Neural Network and Wavelet Coherence Spectrogram of Gait Synchronization
    Febryan Setiawan, An-Bang Liu, Che-Wei Lin
    IEEE Access.2022; 10: 38137.     CrossRef
  • Artificial intelligence in neurodegenerative diseases: A review of available tools with a focus on machine learning techniques
    Alexandra-Maria Tăuţan, Bogdan Ionescu, Emiliano Santarnecchi
    Artificial Intelligence in Medicine.2021; 117: 102081.     CrossRef
  • Identification of Neurodegenerative Diseases Based on Vertical Ground Reaction Force Classification Using Time–Frequency Spectrogram and Deep Learning Neural Network Features
    Febryan Setiawan, Che-Wei Lin
    Brain Sciences.2021; 11(7): 902.     CrossRef
  • The effects of dual-task cognitive interference on gait and turning in Huntington’s disease
    Nicollette L. Purcell, Jennifer G. Goldman, Bichun Ouyang, Yuanqing Liu, Bryan Bernard, Joan A. O’Keefe, Pedro Gonzalez-Alegre
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(1): e0226827.     CrossRef
  • Gait variability as digital biomarker of disease severity in Huntington’s disease
    Heiko Gaßner, Dennis Jensen, F. Marxreiter, Anja Kletsch, Stefan Bohlen, Robin Schubert, Lisa M. Muratori, Bjoern Eskofier, Jochen Klucken, Jürgen Winkler, Ralf Reilmann, Zacharias Kohl
    Journal of Neurology.2020; 267(6): 1594.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of Vertical Ground Reaction Forces Pattern Visualization in Neurodegenerative Diseases Identification Using Deep Learning and Recurrence Plot Image Feature Extraction
    Che-Wei Lin, Tzu-Chien Wen, Febryan Setiawan
    Sensors.2020; 20(14): 3857.     CrossRef
  • Cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) protects against quinolinic acid-induced toxicity in in vitro and in vivo models of Huntington’s disease
    P. Stepanova, V. Srinivasan, D. Lindholm, M. H. Voutilainen
    Scientific Reports.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Rapid and robust patterns of spontaneous locomotor deficits in mouse models of Huntington’s disease
    Taneli Heikkinen, Timo Bragge, Niina Bhattarai, Teija Parkkari, Jukka Puoliväli, Outi Kontkanen, Patrick Sweeney, Larry C. Park, Ignacio Munoz-Sanjuan, Yuqing Li
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(12): e0243052.     CrossRef
  • Rule based classification of neurodegenerative diseases using data driven gait features
    Kartikay Gupta, Aayushi Khajuria, Niladri Chatterjee, Pradeep Joshi, Deepak Joshi
    Health and Technology.2019; 9(4): 547.     CrossRef
  • Discovery of Arginine Ethyl Ester as Polyglutamine Aggregation Inhibitor: Conformational Transitioning of Huntingtin N-Terminus Augments Aggregation Suppression
    Virender Singh, Kinjal A. Patel, Raj Kumar Sharma, Pratik R. Patil, Abhayraj S. Joshi, Rashmi Parihar, Thamarailingam Athilingam, Neeraj Sinha, Subramaniam Ganesh, Pradip Sinha, Ipsita Roy, Ashwani Kumar Thakur
    ACS Chemical Neuroscience.2019; 10(9): 3969.     CrossRef
  • Gait Biomarkers Classification by Combining Assembled Algorithms and Deep Learning: Results of a Local Study
    Eddy Sánchez-DelaCruz, Roberto Weber, R. R. Biswal, Jose Mejía, Gandhi Hernández-Chan, Heberto Gómez-Pozos
    Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine.2019; 2019: 1.     CrossRef
Validation of the Korean Version of the Scale for Outcomes in Parkinson’s Disease-Autonomic
Ji-Young Kim, In-Uk Song, Seong-Beom Koh, Tae-Beom Ahn, Sang Jin Kim, Sang-Myung Cheon, Jin Whan Cho, Yun Joong Kim, Hyeo-Il Ma, Mee-Young Park, Jong Sam Baik, Phil Hyu Lee, Sun Ju Chung, Jong-Min Kim, Han-Joon Kim, Young-Hee Sung, Do Young Kwon, Jae-Hyeok Lee, Jee-Young Lee, Ji Sun Kim, Ji Young Yun, Hee Jin Kim, Jin Young Hong, Mi-Jung Kim, Jinyoung Youn, Ji Seon Kim, Eung Seok Oh, Hui-Jun Yang, Won Tae Yoon, Sooyeoun You, Kyum-Yil Kwon, Hyung-Eun Park, Su-Yun Lee, Younsoo Kim, Hee-Tae Kim, Joong-Seok Kim
J Mov Disord. 2017;10(1):29-34.   Published online January 18, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.16057
  • 15,287 View
  • 361 Download
  • 29 Web of Science
  • 30 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Autonomic symptoms are commonly observed in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and often limit the activities of daily living. The Scale for Outcomes in Parkinson’s disease-Autonomic (SCOPA-AUT) was developed to evaluate and quantify autonomic symptoms in PD. The goal of this study was to translate the original SCOPA-AUT, which was written in English, into Korean and to evaluate its reliability and validity for Korean PD patients.
Methods
For the translation, the following processes were performed: forward translation, backward translation, expert review, pretest of the pre-final version and development of the final Korean version of SCOPA-AUT (K-SCOPA-AUT). In total, 127 patients with PD from 31 movement disorder clinics of university-affiliated hospitals in Korea were enrolled in this study. All patients were assessed using the K-SCOPA-AUT and other motor, non-motor, and quality of life scores. Test-retest reliability for the K-SCOPA-AUT was assessed over a time interval of 10−14 days.
Results
The internal consistency and reliability of the K-SCOPA-AUT was 0.727 as measured by the mean Cronbach’s α-coefficient. The test-retest correlation reliability was 0.859 by the Guttman split-half coefficient. The total K-SCOPA-AUT score showed a positive correlation with other non-motor symptoms [the Korean version of non-motor symptom scale (K-NMSS)], activities of daily living (Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale part II) and quality of life [the Korean version of Parkinson’s Disease Quality of Life 39 (K-PDQ39)].
Conclusion
The K-SCOPA-AUT had good reliability and validity for the assessment of autonomic dysfunction in Korean PD patients. Autonomic symptom severities were associated with many other motor and non-motor impairments and influenced quality of life.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Baseline prevalence and longitudinal assessment of autonomic dysfunction in early Parkinson’s disease
    Lanqing Yang, Huan Gao, Min Ye
    Journal of Neural Transmission.2024; 131(2): 127.     CrossRef
  • Association Between Gait and Dysautonomia in Patients With De Novo Parkinson’s Disease: Forward Gait Versus Backward Gait
    Seon-Min Lee, Mina Lee, Eun Ji Lee, Rae On Kim, Yongduk Kim, Kyum-Yil Kwon
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2023; 16(1): 59.     CrossRef
  • Beyond shallow feelings of complex affect: Non-motor correlates of subjective emotional experience in Parkinson’s disease
    Claudia Carricarte Naranjo, Claudia Sánchez Luaces, Ivonne Pedroso Ibáñez, Andrés Machado, Hichem Sahli, María Antonieta Bobes, Vincenzo De Luca
    PLOS ONE.2023; 18(2): e0281959.     CrossRef
  • Autonomic function and motor subtypes in Parkinson’s disease: a multicentre cross-sectional study
    Si-Chun Gu, Rong Shi, Chen Gao, Xiao-Lei Yuan, You Wu, Zhen-Guo Liu, Chang-De Wang, Shao-Rong Zhao, Xiqun Chen, Can-Xing Yuan, Qing Ye
    Scientific Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Clinical manifestation of patients with isolated rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder after modest-to-long disease duration
    Jung Kyung Hong, Jong-Min Kim, Ki-woong Kim, Ji Won Han, Soyeon Ahn, In-Young Yoon
    Sleep.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Associations of cognitive dysfunction with motor and non-motor symptoms in patients with de novo Parkinson’s disease
    Kyum-Yil Kwon, Suyeon Park, Rae On Kim, Eun Ji Lee, Mina Lee
    Scientific Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Autonomic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease: Results from the Faroese Parkinson's disease cohort
    Aksel Berg, Sára Bech, Jan Aasly, Matthew J. Farrer, Maria Skaalum Petersen
    Neuroscience Letters.2022; 785: 136789.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms, urinary incontinence and retention in Parkinson's disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Fang-Fei Li, Yu-Sha Cui, Rui Yan, Shuang-Shuang Cao, Tao Feng
    Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • White matter tract-specific microstructural disruption is associated with depressive symptoms in isolated RBD
    Jung-Ick Byun, Seunghwan Oh, Jun-Sang Sunwoo, Jung-Won Shin, Tae-Joon Kim, Jin-Sun Jun, Han-Joon Kim, Won Chul Shin, Joon-Kyung Seong, Ki-Young Jung
    NeuroImage: Clinical.2022; 36: 103186.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of disease progression between brain-predominant Parkinson's disease versus Parkinson's disease with body-involvement phenotypes
    Dong-Woo Ryu, Sang-Won Yoo, Yoon-Sang Oh, Kwang-Soo Lee, Seunggyun Ha, Joong-Seok Kim
    Neurobiology of Disease.2022; 174: 105883.     CrossRef
  • Corneal confocal microscopy differentiates patients with Parkinson’s disease with and without autonomic involvement
    Ning-Ning Che, Shuai Chen, Qiu-Huan Jiang, Si-Yuan Chen, Zhen-Xiang Zhao, Xue Li, Rayaz A. Malik, Jian-Jun Ma, Hong-Qi Yang
    npj Parkinson's Disease.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of Nucleus Basalis of Meynert Functional Connectivity and Cognition in Idiopathic Rapid-Eye-Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder
    Jung-Ick Byun, Kwang Su Cha, Minah Kim, Woo-Jin Lee, Han Sang Lee, Jun-Sang Sunwoo, Jung-Won Shin, Tae-Joon Kim, Jin-Sun Jun, Han-Joon Kim, Won Chul Shin, Carlos H. Schenck, Sang Kun Lee, Ki-Young Jung
    Journal of Clinical Neurology.2022; 18(5): 562.     CrossRef
  • White Matter Tract-Specific Microstructural Disruption is Associated with Depressive Symptoms in Isolated Rbd
    Jung-Ick Byun, Seunghwan Oh, Jun-Sang Sunwoo, Jung-Won Shin, Tae-Joon Kim, Jin-Sun Jun, Han-Joon Kim, Won Chul Shin, Joon-Kyung Seong, Ki-Young Jung
    SSRN Electronic Journal .2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Altered insular functional connectivity in isolated REM sleep behavior disorder: a data-driven functional MRI study
    Jung-Ick Byun, Kwang Su Cha, Minah Kim, Woo-Jin Lee, Han Sang Lee, Jun-Sang Sunwoo, Jung-Won Shin, Tae-Joon Kim, Jangsup Moon, Soon-Tae Lee, Keun-Hwa Jung, Kon Chu, Man-Ho Kim, Han-Joon Kim, Won Chul Shin, Sang Kun Lee, Ki-Young Jung
    Sleep Medicine.2021; 79: 88.     CrossRef
  • Association of fall risk factors and non-motor symptoms in patients with early Parkinson’s disease
    Kyum-Yil Kwon, Suyeon Park, Eun Ji Lee, Mina Lee, Hyunjin Ju
    Scientific Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Impact of motor subtype on non‐motor symptoms and fall‐related features in patients with early Parkinson's disease
    Kyum‐Yil Kwon, Eun Ji Lee, Mina Lee, Hyunjin Ju, Kayeong Im
    Geriatrics & Gerontology International.2021; 21(5): 416.     CrossRef
  • Extra-basal ganglia iron content and non-motor symptoms in drug-naïve, early Parkinson’s disease
    Minkyeong Kim, Seulki Yoo, Doyeon Kim, Jin Whan Cho, Ji Sun Kim, Jong Hyun Ahn, Jun Kyu Mun, Inyoung Choi, Seung-Kyun Lee, Jinyoung Youn
    Neurological Sciences.2021; 42(12): 5297.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Assessment Scales in Autonomic Nervous System Disorders
    Eun Bin Cho, Ki-Jong Park
    Journal of the Korean Neurological Association.2021; 39(2 Suppl): 60.     CrossRef
  • Cardiac sympathetic burden reflects Parkinson disease burden, regardless of high or low orthostatic blood pressure changes
    Sang-Won Yoo, Joong-Seok Kim, Yoon-Sang Oh, Dong-Woo Ryu, Seunggyun Ha, Ji-Yeon Yoo, Kwang-Soo Lee
    npj Parkinson's Disease.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Understanding fatigue in progressive supranuclear palsy
    Jong Hyeon Ahn, Joomee Song, Dong Yeong Lee, Jinyoung Youn, Jin Whan Cho
    Scientific Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Validation of the Korean version of the composite autonomic symptom scale 31 in patients with Parkinson’s disease
    Jong Hyeon Ahn, Jin Myoung Seok, Jongkyu Park, Heejeong Jeong, Younsoo Kim, Joomee Song, Inyoung Choi, Jin Whan Cho, Ju-Hong Min, Byoung Joon Kim, Jinyoung Youn, Antonina Luca
    PLOS ONE.2021; 16(10): e0258897.     CrossRef
  • Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction Is Associated with Severity of REM Sleep without Atonia in Isolated REM Sleep Behavior Disorder
    Sooyeoun You, Kyoung Sook Won, Keun Tae Kim, Hyang Woon Lee, Yong Won Cho
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2021; 10(22): 5414.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics of Autonomic Dysfunction in Parkinson’s Disease: A Large Chinese Multicenter Cohort Study
    Zhou Zhou, Xiaoting Zhou, Xiaoxia Zhou, Yaqin Xiang, Liping Zhu, Lixia Qin, Yige Wang, Hongxu Pan, Yuwen Zhao, Qiying Sun, Qian Xu, Xinyin Wu, Xinxiang Yan, Jifeng Guo, Beisha Tang, Zhenhua Liu
    Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Autonomic Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease: Results from the Faroese Parkinson's Disease Cohort
    Aksel Kambsskarð Berg, Sára Bech, Jan O. Aasly, Matthew J. Farrer, Maria Skaalum Petersen
    SSRN Electronic Journal .2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Subtypes of Sleep Disturbance in Parkinson's Disease Based on the Cross-Culturally Validated Korean Version of Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale-2
    Hui-Jun Yang, Han-Joon Kim, Seong-Beom Koh, Joong-Seok Kim, Tae-Beom Ahn, Sang-Myung Cheon, Jin Whan Cho, Yoon-Joong Kim, Hyeo-Il Ma, Mee Young Park, Jong Sam Baik, Phil Hyu Lee, Sun Ju Chung, Jong-Min Kim, In-Uk Song, Ji-Young Kim, Young-Hee Sung, Do You
    Journal of Clinical Neurology.2020; 16(1): 66.     CrossRef
  • Risk Factors for Falls in Patients with de novo Parkinson’s Disease: A Focus on Motor and Non-Motor Symptoms
    Kyum-Yil Kwon, Mina Lee, Hyunjin Ju, Kayeong Im
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2020; 13(2): 142.     CrossRef
  • Peripheral Blood Inflammatory Cytokines in Idiopathic REM Sleep Behavior Disorder
    Ryul Kim, Jin‐Sun Jun, Han‐Joon Kim, Ki‐Young Jung, Yong‐Won Shin, Tae‐Won Yang, Keun Tae Kim, Tae‐Joon Kim, Jung‐Ick Byun, Jun‐Sang Sunwoo, Beomseok Jeon
    Movement Disorders.2019; 34(11): 1739.     CrossRef
  • Urinary Dysfunctions and Post-Void Residual Urine in Typical and Atypical Parkinson Diseases
    Yang-Hyun Lee, Jee-Eun Lee, Dong-Woo Ryu, Yoon-Sang Oh, Kwang-Soo Lee, Sung-Hoo Hong, Joong-Seok Kim
    Journal of Parkinson's Disease.2018; 8(1): 145.     CrossRef
  • Rasch Analysis of the Clinimetric Properties of the Korean Dizziness Handicap Inventory in Patients with Parkinson Disease
    Da-Young Lee, Hui-Jun Yang, Dong-Seok Yang, Jin-Hyuk Choi, Byoung-Soo Park, Ji-Yun Park
    Research in Vestibular Science.2018; 17(4): 152.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Characteristics of Parkinson’s Disease Developed from Essential Tremor
    Dong-Woo Ryu, Si-Hoon Lee, Yoon-Sang Oh, Jae-Young An, Jeong-Wook Park, In-Uk Song, Kwang-Soo Lee, Joong-Seok Kim
    Journal of Parkinson's Disease.2017; 7(2): 369.     CrossRef
Cognition and Visit-to-Visit Variability of Blood Pressure and Heart Rate in De Novo Patients with Parkinson’s Disease
Kyum-Yil Kwon, Seon Jong Pyo, Hye Mi Lee, Woo-Keun Seo, Seong-Beom Koh
J Mov Disord. 2016;9(3):144-151.   Published online September 21, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.16012
  • 13,466 View
  • 122 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
We sought to identify whether the characteristics of long-term visit-to-visit blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) are related to baseline cognitive profiles in, Parkinson’s disease (PD).
Methods
We selected drug-naïve PD patients who visited our hospital at least 10 times with a baseline assessment of the Seoul neuropsychological battery. BP and HR were measured at each visit, and the variability of the systolic BP/diastolic BP (DBP) and HR was derived from the parameters of serial 10 office visits. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in PD patients was determined according to the proposed criteria with a cut-off value of z-score ≤ -2.
Results
Forty-seven patients with PD (mean follow-up duration = 22.3 months) were enrolled in the study. Compared with non-MCI PD patients, MCI PD patients revealed a significant increase in HR and/or variability in DBP.
Conclusion
This exploratory study showed that baseline cognition in drug-naïve PD patients might be related to the visit-to-visit variability of DBP and/or HR.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association between the blood pressure variability and cognitive decline in Parkinson's disease
    Yi Xiao, Tianmi Yang, Lingyu Zhang, Qianqian Wei, Ruwei Ou, Yanbing Hou, Kuncheng Liu, Junyu Lin, Qirui Jiang, Huifang Shang
    Brain and Behavior.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction is associated with executive dysfunction and poorer quality of life in progressive supranuclear palsy-Richardson’s syndrome
    Peng Liu, Yueting Chen, Bo Wang, Sheng Wu, Leilei Zeng, Zhidong Cen, Dehao Yang, Haotian Wang, Xinhui Chen, Lebo Wang, Zhiyuan Ouyang, Wei Luo
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience.2022; 96: 147.     CrossRef
  • Blood Pressure Variability and Cognitive Function: a Scoping Review
    Nur Fazidah Asmuje, Sumaiyah Mat, Phyo Kyaw Myint, Maw Pin Tan
    Current Hypertension Reports.2022; 24(10): 375.     CrossRef
  • Associations of cognitive dysfunction with motor and non-motor symptoms in patients with de novo Parkinson’s disease
    Kyum-Yil Kwon, Suyeon Park, Rae On Kim, Eun Ji Lee, Mina Lee
    Scientific Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Blood pressure variability is related to faster cognitive decline in ischemic stroke patients: PICASSO subanalysis
    Yerim Kim, Jae-Sung Lim, Mi Sun Oh, Kyung-Ho Yu, Ji Sung Lee, Jong-Ho Park, Yong-Jae Kim, Joung-Ho Rha, Yang-Ha Hwang, Sung Hyuk Heo, Seong Hwan Ahn, Ju-Hun Lee, Sun U. Kwon
    Scientific Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The correlation of blood pressure variability and cognitive function in hypertension patients: A meta‐analysis
    Xiaojie Jin, Yi Lu, Peng Zhao
    International Journal of Clinical Practice.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Burden and correlates of cognitive impairment among hypertensive patients in Tanzania: a cross-sectional study
    Pedro Pallangyo, Zabella S. Mkojera, Makrina Komba, Lucy R. Mgopa, Smita Bhalia, Henry Mayala, Salma Wibonela, Nsajigwa Misidai, Happiness J. Swai, Jalack Millinga, Ester Chavala, Peter R. Kisenge, Mohamed Janabi
    BMC Neurology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Backward Gait is Associated with Motor Symptoms and Fear of Falling in Patients withDe NovoParkinson's Disease
    Kyum-Yil Kwon, Suyeon Park, Hye Mi Lee, Young-Min Park, Jinhee Kim, Jaehwan Kim, Seong-Beom Koh
    Journal of Clinical Neurology.2019; 15(4): 473.     CrossRef

JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders Twitter