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JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders

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3 "Sang Won Han"
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Original Articles
Cognition, Olfaction and Uric Acid in Early de novo Parkinson’s Disease
Hwa Reung Lee, Joong Hyun Park, Sang Won Han, Jong Sam Baik
J Mov Disord. 2018;11(3):139-144.   Published online September 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18037
  • 5,177 View
  • 136 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Cognitive impairment is one of the nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD), and olfactory dysfunction is used as a marker to detect premotor stages of PD. Serum uric acid (sUA) levels have been found to be a risk factor for PD. Our objective in this study was to examine whether sUA levels are associated with cognitive changes and olfactory dysfunction in early de novo PD patients.
Methods
The study participants included 196 de novo PD patients. We assessed cognitive function by the Korean versions of the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment and assessed olfactory function by the Korean version of the Sniffin’ Sticks test.
Results
The mean sUA level was 4.7 mg/dL and was significantly lower in women than in men. Cognitive scores were lower in women, suggesting that sUA levels were related to cognitive function. The olfactory functions were not related to sUA level but were clearly associated with cognitive scores. Olfactory threshold, odor discrimination, and odor identification were all significantly related to cognitive scores.
Conclusion
We conclude that lower sUA levels were associated with cognitive impairment, not olfactory dysfunction, in de novo PD patients. This finding suggests that UA is neuroprotective as an antioxidant in the cognitive function of PD patients.
A Comparative Study of Central Hemodynamics in Parkinson’s Disease
Joong Hyun Park, Sang Won Han, Jong Sam Baik
J Mov Disord. 2017;10(3):135-139.   Published online August 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.17035
  • 4,878 View
  • 90 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
To explore the central aortic pressure in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD).
Methods
We investigated central arterial stiffness by measurement of the augmentation index (AIx) in PD patients. Patients were eligible for the study if they were de novo PD and 45 years of age or older. The patients’ demographics, vascular risk factors, and neurologic examinations were collected at baseline. The AIx was measured by applanation tonometry.
Results
A total of 147 subjects (77 in control and 70 in PD groups) were enrolled in the study. While there was no significant difference in peripheral systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), or mean arterial pressure between groups, peripheral pulse pressure (PP) was significantly lower in the PD group than in the control group (p = 0.012). Regarding central pressure, aortic DBP was significantly higher and PP was significantly lower in the PD group (p = 0.001, < 0.0001). Although there was no significant difference in the AIx between the groups, a trend toward a lower AIx was observed in the PD group (31.2% vs. 28.1%, p = 0.074).
Conclusion
This study showed that peripheral and central PP was significantly lower in the PD group than in the control group. Our study suggests that PD patients may have a low risk of a cardiovascular event by reason of a lower PP.
Case Report
Dopaminergic Medication-Related Repetitive Behaviors in Parkinson’s Disease
Jong Sam Baik, Sang Won Han, Jeong Yeon Kim, Jae Hyeon Park
J Mov Disord. 2008;1(2):101-103.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.08020
  • 12,149 View
  • 138 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

A set of impulse control and repetitive behaviors presumed to be related to dopaminergic medications has been recognized in Parkinson’s disease (PD). A 68-year-old man presented with compulsive gathering of new towels for 8 months after increasing his medication dosage. After we reduced a dose of Sinemet® and ropinirole as before, and added amantadine, his repetitive behavior was gone and dyskinesia was improved.


JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders