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Brief communication
Evaluating the validity and reliability of the Korean version of Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson’s Disease–Cognition
Jinse Park, Eung Seok Oh, Seong-Beom Koh, In-Uk Song, Tae-Beom Ahn, Sang Jin Kim, Sang-Myung Cheon, Yun Joong Kim, Jin Whan Cho, Hyeo-Il Ma, Mee-Young Park, Jong Sam Baik, Phil Hyu Lee, Sun Ju Chung, Jong-Min Kim, Han-Joon Kim, Young-Hee Sung, Do Young Kwon, Jae-Hyeok Lee, Jee-Young Lee, Ji Sun Kim, Ji Young Yun, Hee Jin Kim, Jin Young Hong, Mi-Jung Kim, Jinyoung Youn, Ji Seon Kim, Hui-Jun Yang, Won Tae Yoon, Sooyeoun You, Kyum-Yil Kwon, Su-Yun Lee, Younsoo Kim, Hee-Tae Kim, Joong-Seok Kim, Ji-Young Kim
Received March 8, 2024  Accepted April 2, 2024  Published online April 3, 2024  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.24061    [Accepted]
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  • 12 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
The Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson’s Disease–Cognition (SCOPA-Cog) was developed to screen for cognition in PD. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the validity and reliability of the Korean version of the SCOPA-cog.
Methods
We recruited 129 PD patients from 31 clinics with movement disorders in South Korea. The original version of the SCOPA-cognition was translated into Korean using the translation-retranslation method. The test-rest method with an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Cronbach’s alpha coefficient were used to assess reliability. The Spearman’s Rank correlation analysis with Montreal Cognitive Assessment-Korean version (MOCA-K) and Korean Mini-Mental State Examination (K-MMSE) were used to assess concurrent validity.
Results
The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was 0.797, and the ICC was 0.887. Spearman’s rank correlation analysis showed a significant correlation with the K-MMSE and MOCA-K scores (r = 0.546 and r = 0.683, respectively).
Conclusions
Our results demonstrate that K-SCOPA-Cog exhibits good reliability and validity.
Original Article
Comparing MoCA Performance in Parkinson’s disease: Age and Education-Adjusted Cutoffs vs. Machine Learning
Kyeongmin Baek, Young Min Kim, Han Kyu Na, Junki Lee, Dong Ho Shin, Seok-Jae Heo, Seok Jong Chung, Kiyong Kim, Phil Hyu Lee, Young H Sohn, Jeehee Yoon, Yun Joong Kim
Received December 23, 2023  Accepted February 12, 2024  Published online February 13, 2024  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.23271    [Accepted]
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
and Objectives The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) is recommended for general cognitive evaluation in Parkinson’s Disease (PD). However, age- and education-adjusted cutoffs specifically for PD have not been developed and systematically validated across PD cohorts with diverse education levels.
Methods
This retrospective analysis utilized data from 1,293 Korean patients with PD, where cognitive diagnoses were determined through comprehensive neuropsychological assessments. Age- and education-adjusted cutoffs were formulated based on 1,202 patients with PD. To identify the optimal machine learning model, clinical parameters and MoCA domain scores from 416 patients with PD were used. Comparative analyses between machine learning and different cutoffs were conducted on an additional 91 consecutive patients with PD.
Results
The cutoffs for cognitive impairment decrease with advancing age within the same education level. Similarly, lower education levels within the same age group correspond to lower cutoffs. For individuals aged 60–80, cutoffs were set as follows: 25 or 24 for those with over 12 years of education, 23 or 22 for 10–12 years, and 21 or 20 for 7–9 years. Comparisons between age- and education-adjusted cutoffs and the machine learning method showed comparable accuracies. The cutoff method demonstrated higher sensitivity (0.8627), whereas machine learning achieved higher specificity (0.8250).
Conclusions
Both the age- and education-adjusted cutoff method and machine learning demonstrated high effectiveness in detecting cognitive impairment in PD. This study highlights the necessity of tailored cutoffs and suggests the potential of machine learning to enhance cognitive assessments in PD.
Letter to the editor
Factors associated with anticholinergic-induced oral-buccal-lingual dyskinesia in Parkinson’s disease
Joonyoung Ha, Suk Yun Kang, Kyoungwon Baik, Young H. Sohn, Phil Hyu Lee, Min Seok Baek, Jin Yong Hong
J Mov Disord. 2024;17(1):109-111.   Published online September 22, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.23069
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  • 66 Download
PDFSupplementary Material
Review Article
Subjective Cognitive Complaints in Cognitively Normal Patients With Parkinson’s Disease: A Systematic Review
Jin Yong Hong, Phil Hyu Lee
J Mov Disord. 2023;16(1):1-12.   Published online November 10, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22059
  • 3,272 View
  • 322 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Subjective cognitive complaints (SCCs) refer to self-perceived cognitive decline and are related to objective cognitive decline. SCCs in cognitively normal individuals are considered a preclinical sign of subsequent cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer’s disease, and SCCs in cognitively normal patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) are also gaining attention. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of the current research on SCCs in cognitively normal patients with PD. A systematic search found a lack of consistency in the methodologies used to define and measure SCCs. Although the association between SCCs and objective cognitive performance in cognitively normal patients with PD is controversial, SCCs appear to be predictive of subsequent cognitive decline. These findings support the clinical value of SCCs in cognitively normal status in PD; however, further convincing evidence from biomarker studies is needed to provide a pathophysiological basis for these findings. Additionally, a consensus on the definition and assessment of SCCs is needed for further investigations.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Subjective Cognitive Complaints in Parkinson's Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta‐Analysis
    Mattia Siciliano, Alessandro Tessitore, Francesca Morgante, Jennifer G. Goldman, Lucia Ricciardi
    Movement Disorders.2024; 39(1): 17.     CrossRef
  • Mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease: current view
    Kurt A. Jellinger
    Frontiers in Cognition.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of Neuropsychiatric Symptom Profiles With Cognitive Decline in Patients With Parkinson Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment
    Young-gun Lee, Mincheol Park, Seong Ho Jeong, Kyoungwon Baik, Sungwoo Kang, So Hoon Yoon, Han Kyu Na, Young H. Sohn, Phil Hyu Lee
    Neurology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Subjective cognitive complaints in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy
    Jun Seok Lee, Jong Hyeon Ahn, Jong Mok Ha, Jinyoung Youn, Jin Whan Cho
    Frontiers in Neurology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Daily Emotional Experiences in Persons with Parkinson Disease: Relations to Subjective Cognitive Complaints and Quality of Life
    Karen R. Hebert, Mackenzie Feldhacker
    Physical & Occupational Therapy In Geriatrics.2023; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Pathobiology of Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson Disease: Challenges and Outlooks
    Kurt A. Jellinger
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2023; 25(1): 498.     CrossRef
Original Article
Potential Link Between Cognition and Motor Reserve in Patients With Parkinson’s Disease
Seok Jong Chung, Yae Ji Kim, Yun Joong Kim, Hye Sun Lee, Mijin Yun, Phil Hyu Lee, Yong Jeong, Young H. Sohn
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(3):249-257.   Published online September 7, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22063
  • 2,668 View
  • 149 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
To investigate whether there is a link between cognitive function and motor reserve (i.e., individual capacity to cope with nigrostriatal dopamine depletion) in patients with newly diagnosed Parkinson’s disease (PD).
Methods
A total of 163 patients with drug-naïve PD who underwent 18F-FP-CIT PET, brain MRI, and a detailed neuropsychological test were enrolled. We estimated individual motor reserve based on initial motor deficits and striatal dopamine depletion using a residual model. We performed correlation analyses between motor reserve estimates and cognitive composite scores. Diffusion connectometry analysis was performed to map the white matter fiber tracts, of which fractional anisotropy (FA) values were well correlated with motor reserve estimates. Additionally, Cox regression analysis was used to assess the effect of initial motor reserve on the risk of dementia conversion.
Results
The motor reserve estimate was positively correlated with the composite score of the verbal memory function domain (γ = 0.246) and with the years of education (γ = 0.251). Connectometry analysis showed that FA values in the left fornix were positively correlated with the motor reserve estimate, while no fiber tracts were negatively correlated with the motor reserve estimate. Cox regression analysis demonstrated that higher motor reserve estimates tended to be associated with a lower risk of dementia conversion (hazard ratio, 0.781; 95% confidence interval, 0.576–1.058).
Conclusion
The present study demonstrated that the motor reserve estimate was well correlated with verbal memory function and with white matter integrity in the left fornix, suggesting a possible link between cognition and motor reserve in patients with PD.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Hippocampal Perfusion Affects Motor and Cognitive Functions in Parkinson Disease: An Early Phase 18F‐FP‐CIT Positron Emission Tomography Study
    Min Young Chun, Seok Jong Chung, Su Hong Kim, Chan Wook Park, Seong Ho Jeong, Hye Sun Lee, Phil Hyu Lee, Young H. Sohn, Yong Jeong, Yun Joong Kim
    Annals of Neurology.2024; 95(2): 388.     CrossRef
  • Imaging Procedure and Clinical Studies of [18F]FP-CIT PET
    Changhwan Sung, Seung Jun Oh, Jae Seung Kim
    Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Extra-Basal Ganglia Brain Structures Are Related to Motor Reserve in Parkinson’s Disease
    Jinyoung Youn, Ji Hye Won, Mansu Kim, Junmo Kwon, Seung Hwan Moon, Minkyeong Kim, Jong Hyun Ahn, Jun Kyu Mun, Hyunjin Park, Jin Whan Cho
    Journal of Parkinson's Disease.2023; 13(1): 39.     CrossRef
Review Article
Emerging Concepts of Motor Reserve in Parkinson’s Disease
Seok Jong Chung, Jae Jung Lee, Phil Hyu Lee, Young H. Sohn
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(3):171-184.   Published online August 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20029
  • 9,881 View
  • 308 Download
  • 27 Web of Science
  • 31 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
The concept of cognitive reserve (CR) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) explains the differences between individuals in their susceptibility to AD-related pathologies. An enhanced CR may lead to less cognitive deficits despite severe pathological lesions. Parkinson’s disease (PD) is also a common neurodegenerative disease and is mainly characterized by motor dysfunction related to striatal dopaminergic depletion. The degree of motor deficits in PD is closely correlated to the degree of dopamine depletion; however, significant individual variations still exist. Therefore, we hypothesized that the presence of motor reserve (MR) in PD explains the individual differences in motor deficits despite similar levels of striatal dopamine depletion. Since 2015, we have performed a series of studies investigating MR in de novo patients with PD using the data of initial clinical presentation and dopamine transporter PET scan. In this review, we summarized the results of these published studies. In particular, some premorbid experiences (i.e., physical activity and education) and modifiable factors (i.e., body mass index and white matter hyperintensity on brain image studies) could modulate an individual’s capacity to tolerate PD pathology, which can be maintained throughout disease progression.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • How long have you exercised in your life? The effect of motor reserve and current physical activity on cognitive performance
    Veronica Pucci, Carolina Guerra, Amanda Barsi, Massimo Nucci, Sara Mondini
    Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society.2024; 30(1): 11.     CrossRef
  • Hippocampal Perfusion Affects Motor and Cognitive Functions in Parkinson Disease: An Early Phase 18F‐FP‐CIT Positron Emission Tomography Study
    Min Young Chun, Seok Jong Chung, Su Hong Kim, Chan Wook Park, Seong Ho Jeong, Hye Sun Lee, Phil Hyu Lee, Young H. Sohn, Yong Jeong, Yun Joong Kim
    Annals of Neurology.2024; 95(2): 388.     CrossRef
  • Clinical severity in Parkinson’s disease is determined by decline in cortical compensation
    Martin E Johansson, Ivan Toni, Roy P C Kessels, Bastiaan R Bloem, Rick C Helmich
    Brain.2024; 147(3): 871.     CrossRef
  • Differences in [123I]Ioflupane Striatal Binding Between African American and White Patients
    Juebin Huang, Kevin J. Sullivan, Vani Vijayakumar
    Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology.2024; : jnmt.123.265806.     CrossRef
  • Plasma extracellular vesicle synaptic proteins as biomarkers of clinical progression in patients with Parkinson’s disease
    Chien-Tai Hong, Chen-Chih Chung, Ruan-Ching Yu, Lung Chan
    eLife.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Plasma extracellular vesicle synaptic proteins as biomarkers of clinical progression in patients with Parkinson’s disease
    Chien-Tai Hong, Chen-Chih Chung, Ruan-Ching Yu, Lung Chan
    eLife.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Considering the response in addition to the challenge – a narrative review in appraisal of a motor reserve framework
    Daniel Zeller, Shawn Hiew, Thorsten Odorfer, Carine Nguemeni
    Aging.2024; 16(6): 5772.     CrossRef
  • The greatest loss of unpleasant smells may be related to the risk of more severe PD symptoms
    Shih-Chi Chiu, Ting-Chun Fang, Hsin-Bei Lei, Yu-Hsuan Lin, Ming-Hong Chang, Yi-Jen Guo
    Frontiers in Neurology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Lifestyle Modulators of Neuroplasticity in Parkinson’s Disease: Evidence in Human Neuroimaging Studies
    Silvia Paola Caminiti, Silvia Gallo, Federico Menegon, Andrea Naldi, Cristoforo Comi, Giacomo Tondo
    CNS & Neurological Disorders - Drug Targets.2024; 23(5): 602.     CrossRef
  • Motor progression marker for newly diagnosed drug‐naïve patients with Parkinson's disease: A resting‐state functional MRI study
    Yanbing Hou, Lingyu Zhang, Ruwei Ou, Qianqian Wei, Xiaojing Gu, Kuncheng Liu, Junyu Lin, Tianmi Yang, Yi Xiao, Qiyong Gong, Huifang Shang
    Human Brain Mapping.2023; 44(3): 901.     CrossRef
  • The Concept of Motor Reserve in Parkinson's Disease: New Wine in Old Bottles?
    Merle C. Hoenig, Verena Dzialas, Alexander Drzezga, Thilo van Eimeren
    Movement Disorders.2023; 38(1): 16.     CrossRef
  • Patterns of striatal dopamine depletion and motor deficits in de novo Parkinson’s disease
    Seong Ho Jeong, Chan Wook Park, Hye Sun Lee, Yun Joong Kim, Mijin Yun, Phil Hyu Lee, Young H. Sohn, Seok Jong Chung
    Journal of Neural Transmission.2023; 130(1): 19.     CrossRef
  • Sex Differences in Brain Structure in de novo Parkinson’s Disease: A Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Neuroimaging Study
    Hui Li, Xuejia Jia, Min Chen, Xiuqin Jia, Qi Yang
    Journal of Parkinson's Disease.2023; 13(5): 785.     CrossRef
  • Exploring the Complex Phenotypes of Impaired Finger Dexterity in Mild-to-moderate Stage Parkinson’s Disease: A Time-Series Analysis
    Pattamon Panyakaew, Kotchakorn Duangjino, Apiwoot Kerddonfag, Teerit Ploensin, Krerk Piromsopa, Chanon Kongkamol, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
    Journal of Parkinson's Disease.2023; 13(6): 975.     CrossRef
  • Prevention of Falls in Parkinson's Disease: Guidelines and Gaps
    Richard Camicioli, Meg E. Morris, Frederico Pieruccini‐Faria, Manuel Montero‐Odasso, Surim Son, David Buzaglo, Jeffrey M. Hausdorff, Alice Nieuwboer
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice.2023; 10(10): 1459.     CrossRef
  • The incidence of deep venous thrombosis in Parkinson’s disease
    Emine Afsin, Zeliha Coşgun, Ramazan Kurul, Şule Aydın Türkoğlu
    Neurological Research.2023; 45(11): 1050.     CrossRef
  • Premorbid Educational Attainment and Long-Term Motor Prognosis in Parkinson’s Disease
    Seong Ho Jeong, Seok Jong Chung, Han Soo Yoo, Jin Ho Jung, Kyoungwon Baik, Yang Hyun Lee, Phil Hyu Lee, Young H. Sohn
    Journal of Parkinson's Disease.2022; 12(1): 129.     CrossRef
  • Parkinsonism and cerebrovascular disease
    Manisha Narasimhan, Raymond Schwartz, Glenda Halliday
    Journal of the Neurological Sciences.2022; 433: 120011.     CrossRef
  • Impact of α‐synuclein spreading on the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway depends on the onset of the pathology
    Fanfan Sun, Armando G. Salinas, Severin Filser, Sonja Blumenstock, Jose Medina‐Luque, Jochen Herms, Carmelo Sgobio
    Brain Pathology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Premorbid cancer and motor reserve in patients with Parkinson’s disease
    Yoon-Sang Oh, Sang-Won Yoo, Chul Hyoung Lyoo, Kwang-Soo Lee, Joong-Seok Kim
    Scientific Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Behavioral Reserve in Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia
    Su Hong Kim, Yae Ji Kim, Byung Hwa Lee, Peter Lee, Ji Hyung Park, Sang Won Seo, Yong Jeong
    Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Identifying the white matter structural network of motor reserve in early Parkinson's disease
    Yae Ji Kim, Chan Wook Park, Hye Won Shin, Hye Sun Lee, Yun Joong Kim, Mijin Yun, Phil Hyu Lee, Young H. Sohn, Yong Jeong, Seok Jong Chung
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2022; 102: 108.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of disease progression between brain-predominant Parkinson's disease versus Parkinson's disease with body-involvement phenotypes
    Dong-Woo Ryu, Sang-Won Yoo, Yoon-Sang Oh, Kwang-Soo Lee, Seunggyun Ha, Joong-Seok Kim
    Neurobiology of Disease.2022; 174: 105883.     CrossRef
  • Genetically-informed prediction of short-term Parkinson’s disease progression
    Hossein J. Sadaei, Aldo Cordova-Palomera, Jonghun Lee, Jaya Padmanabhan, Shang-Fu Chen, Nathan E. Wineinger, Raquel Dias, Daria Prilutsky, Sandor Szalma, Ali Torkamani
    npj Parkinson's Disease.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Potential Link Between Cognition and Motor Reserve in Patients With Parkinson’s Disease
    Seok Jong Chung, Yae Ji Kim, Yun Joong Kim, Hye Sun Lee, Mijin Yun, Phil Hyu Lee, Yong Jeong, Young H. Sohn
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2022; 15(3): 249.     CrossRef
  • Local striatal volume and motor reserve in drug-naïve Parkinson’s disease
    Seong Ho Jeong, Eun-Chong Lee, Seok Jong Chung, Hye Sun Lee, Jin Ho Jung, Young H. Sohn, Joon-Kyung Seong, Phil Hyu Lee
    npj Parkinson's Disease.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness and safety of electroacupuncture in treating Parkinson disease
    Wei Xu, Sha OuYang, Zhenhai Chi, ZhiQin Wang, DaoCheng Zhu, RiXin Chen, GenPing Zhong, FengTing Zhang, GuiQin Zhou, SiWei Duan, Lin Jiao
    Medicine.2021; 100(10): e25095.     CrossRef
  • Differences in cause and 12-month follow-up outcome of parkinsonian symptoms in depressed older adults treated with antipsychotics: a case series
    Anastasios Politis, Nikolaos Kokras, Michael Souvatzoglou, Kostas Siarkos, Panagiotis Toulas, Constantin Potagas, Theodoros Hatzipanagiotou, Georgios Limouris, Panagiotis Alexopoulos
    BMC Psychiatry.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness and safety of moxibustion for Parkinson disease
    Yonghui Hou, Baile Ning, Yamin Liu, Ying Liu, Wenbin Fu, Zehuai Wen
    Medicine.2021; 100(23): e26256.     CrossRef
  • Glucocerebrosidase Mutations and Motor Reserve in Parkinson’s Disease
    Seok Jong Chung, Phil Hyu Lee, Young H. Sohn, Yun Joong Kim
    Journal of Parkinson's Disease.2021; 11(4): 1715.     CrossRef
  • Analysis of pupillometer results according to disease stage in patients with Parkinson’s disease
    Sooyeoun You, Jeong-Ho Hong, Joonsang Yoo
    Scientific Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Article
Association between Olfactory Deficit and Motor and Cognitive Function in Parkinson’s Disease
Han Soo Yoo, Seok Jong Chung, Yang Hyun Lee, Byoung Seok Ye, Young H. Sohn, Phil Hyu Lee
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(2):133-141.   Published online April 6, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.19082
  • 9,931 View
  • 280 Download
  • 21 Web of Science
  • 21 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
To investigate whether baseline olfactory dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients is associated with baseline and longitudinal motor and cognitive function.
Methods
We recruited 228 drug-naïve PD patients who were followed for a mean of 6 years. Patients underwent the Cross-Cultural Smell Identification Test (CCSIT), a neuropsychological test, and N-(3-[18F]fluoropropyl)-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl) nortropane positron emission tomography within 6 months of the baseline evaluation. Olfactory dysfunction was categorized as normosmia (CCSIT score ≥ 9), hyposmia (CCSIT score 5–8), and anosmia (CCSIT score ≤ 4). During the follow-up period, we investigated changes in the levodopa-equivalent dose (LED) and the occurrence of wearing-off, levodopa-induced dyskinesia, and dementia.
Results
Among the PD patients, 80.7% were hyposmic at the time of diagnosis, and 26.1% were anosmic. Baseline olfactory dysfunction was not associated with either initial parkinsonian motor symptoms or with the longitudinal LED increment and motor complications. Meanwhile, the anosmic group had lower baseline scores on the Korea version of the Boston Naming Test and Stroop color reading test than the normosmic and hyposmic groups. The anosmic group exhibited a higher rate of conversion to dementia than the normosmic [adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 3.99, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08–14.72] and hyposmic (adjusted HR 2.48, 95% CI 1.15–5.32) PD groups, regardless of baseline motor deficits and cognitive status.
Conclusion
Baseline olfactory dysfunction was not associated with motor deficits and complications, but it was associated with cognitive dysfunction and prognosis, suggesting that severe olfactory impairment may reflect early cortical involvement, probably in the frontotemporal region, and rapid spreading of Lewy body pathology.

Citations

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  • Correlation of olfactory function factors with cardiac sympathetic denervation in Parkinson’s disease
    Dong-Woo Ryu, Sang-Won Yoo, Ko-Eun Choi, Yoon-Sang Oh, Joong-Seok Kim
    Journal of Neurology.2024; 271(3): 1397.     CrossRef
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    Gabriel Torres-Pasillas, Donají Chi-Castañeda, Porfirio Carrillo-Castilla, Gerardo Marín, María Elena Hernández-Aguilar, Gonzalo Emiliano Aranda-Abreu, Jorge Manzo, Luis I. García
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    Revue Neurologique.2023; 179(9): 947.     CrossRef
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    Ting-Chun Fang, Yu-Shan Tsai, Ming-Hong Chang
    Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Xiang Liu, Zhuofan Lei, Dylan Gilhooly, Junyun He, Yun Li, Rodney M. Ritzel, Hui Li, Long-Jun Wu, Shaolin Liu, Junfang Wu
    Brain, Behavior, and Immunity.2023; 114: 22.     CrossRef
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    Fardin Nabizadeh, Kasra Pirahesh, Elham Khalili
    Neurological Sciences.2022; 43(7): 4193.     CrossRef
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    Jaewon Kim, Dong Keon Yon, Kyu Yeong Choi, Jang Jae Lee, Namwoo Kim, Kun Ho Lee, Jae Gwan Kim
    Alzheimer's Research & Therapy.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Jiju Narayanan Avanipully, Dithu Thekkekkara, Sahyadri M, Vipan K. Parihar, Santhepete Nanjundaiah Manjula
    Journal of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapeutics.2022; 13(1): 31.     CrossRef
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    Zara M. Patel, Eric H. Holbrook, Justin H. Turner, Nithin D. Adappa, Mark W. Albers, Aytug Altundag, Simone Appenzeller, Richard M. Costanzo, Ilona Croy, Greg E. Davis, Puya Dehgani‐Mobaraki, Richard L. Doty, Valerie B. Duffy, Bradley J. Goldstein, David
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    Tommaso Ercoli, Carla Masala, Gianluca Cadeddu, Marcello Mario Mascia, Gianni Orofino, Angelo Fabio Gigante, Paolo Solla, Giovanni Defazio, Lorenzo Rocchi
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    Vasudeva Murthy Challakere Ramaswamy, Peter William Schofield
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  • Nasal and Parotid Blood Pool Activity Is Significantly Correlated with Metabolic Syndrome Components and Sleep Apnea
    William T. Phillips, Nasser J. Issa, Shereef B. Elhalwagi, Hilda T. Draeger, Joyce G. Schwartz, Jonathan A. Gelfond
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    Gabriel A. de Erausquin, Heather Snyder, Traolach S. Brugha, Sudha Seshadri, Maria Carrillo, Rajesh Sagar, Yueqin Huang, Charles Newton, Carmela Tartaglia, Charlotte Teunissen, Krister Håkanson, Rufus Akinyemi, Kameshwar Prasad, Giovanni D'Avossa, Gabriel
    Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Machine learning-based prediction of cognitive outcomes in de novo Parkinson’s disease
    Joshua Harvey, Rick A. Reijnders, Rachel Cavill, Annelien Duits, Sebastian Köhler, Lars Eijssen, Bart P. F. Rutten, Gemma Shireby, Ali Torkamani, Byron Creese, Albert F. G. Leentjens, Katie Lunnon, Ehsan Pishva
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    Chao Li, Ying Hou, Xu Wang, Yue-xuan Li, Feng Li, Chao Zhang, Wei-guo Li
    Frontiers in Neurology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Jae Jung Lee, Jin Yong Hong, Jong Sam Baik
    Journal of Neural Transmission.2021; 128(6): 763.     CrossRef
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    Journal of Parkinson's Disease.2021; 11(4): 1703.     CrossRef
Case Report
A Case of Abnormal Postures in the Left Extremities after Pontine Hemorrhage: Dystonia or Pseudodystonia?
Chan Wook Park, Seok Jong Chung, Young H. Sohn, Phil Hyu Lee
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(1):62-65.   Published online January 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.19074
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
It is difficult to determine the pathoanatomical correlates of dystonia because of its complex pathophysiology, and most cases with secondary dystonia are associated with basal ganglia lesions. Moreover, it is a challenging issue that patients with abnormal postures accompanied by other neurological findings in the affected body part (e.g., sensory loss) can be diagnosed with true dystonia or pseudodystonia. Here, we report a case of abnormal postures with loss of proprioception in the left extremities after right dorsal pontine hemorrhage.

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  • Rehabilitation of hemidystonia as a result of right pontine hemorrhagic stroke
    Melanie Aing, Craig DiTommaso
    The Journal of the International Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine.2023; 6(4): 116.     CrossRef
  • Hemidystonia after Pontine Hemorrhage Successfully Treated with Pharmacotherapy and Intensive Rehabilitation: a Case Report
    Gyu Seong Kim, Yeon Gyu Jeong, Yoon Jeong Jeong, Seo Yeon Yoon
    Brain & Neurorehabilitation.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Articles
Heterogeneous Patterns of Striatal Dopamine Loss in Patients with Young- versus Old-Onset Parkinson’s Disease: Impact on Clinical Features
Seok Jong Chung, Han Soo Yoo, Yang Hyun Lee, Phil Hyu Lee, Young H. Sohn
J Mov Disord. 2019;12(2):113-119.   Published online May 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18064
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  • 24 Web of Science
  • 26 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Ample evidence has suggested that age at onset of Parkinson’s disease (PD) is associated with heterogeneous clinical features in individuals. We hypothesized that this may be attributed to different patterns of nigrostriatal dopamine loss.
Methods
A total of 205 consecutive patients with de novo PD who underwent 18F-FP-CIT PET scans (mean follow-up duration, 6.31 years) were divided into three tertile groups according to their age at onset of parkinsonian motor symptoms. Striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) availability was compared between the old- (n = 73) and young-onset (n = 66) groups. In addition, the risk of developing freezing of gait (FOG) and longitudinal requirements for dopaminergic medications were examined.
Results
The old-onset PD group (mean age at onset, 72.66 years) exhibited more severe parkinsonian motor signs than the young-onset group (52.58 years), despite comparable DAT availability in the posterior putamen; moreover, the old-onset group exhibited more severely decreased DAT availability in the caudate than the young-onset group. A Cox regression model revealed that the old-onset PD group had a higher risk for developing FOG than the young-onset group [hazard ratio 2.523, 95% confidence interval (1.239–5.140)]. The old-onset group required higher doses of dopaminergic medications for symptom control than the young-onset group over time.
Conclusion
The present study demonstrated that the old-onset PD group exhibited more severe dopamine loss in the caudate and were more likely to develop gait freezing, suggesting that age at onset may be one of the major determinants of the pattern of striatal dopamine depletion and progression of gait disturbance in PD.

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Patients and Their Caregivers’ Burdens for Parkinson’s Disease in Korea
Jong Sam Baik, Joong-Seok Kim, Seong-Beom Koh, Jin Whan Cho, Phil Hyu Lee, Hyeo-Il Ma, Yun Joong Kim, Tae-Beom Ahn, Sang Jin Kim, Yong Duk Kim, Seong-min Choi, Ho-Won Lee, Hee Tae Kim
J Mov Disord. 2017;10(3):109-115.   Published online September 22, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.17053
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Many patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) suffer from motor and non-motor symptoms. According to these variable symptoms of PD, patients or caregivers have a poorer quality of life than patients with other neurodegenerative diseases. Since the difficulties are varied for all patients, prioritizing their difficulties differs among all cases. The goal of this study was to investigate the burdens of PD among the caregivers as well as patients and to identify areas requiring aid from the government.
Methods
We surveyed the awareness and perceptions of PD in patients and caregivers of PD by a face-to-face questionnaire. The questionnaire was divided into three sections: symptoms of PD (part A), desire for policies (part B), and difficulties faced by their caregivers (part C). Part A comprised 8 questions, Part B had 2 questions, and Part C had 3 questions.
Results
In total, 853 subjects (702 patients and 151 caregivers) were enrolled in this study. The major difficulties experienced by PD patients were physical (67%), psychiatric (60%) and socio-economic (52%). Assessing the physical difficulties, more than half the patients experienced severe difficulties (29% very severe, 39% severe). Psychiatric difficulties were assessed as severe (35%) and very severe (21%) among the patients. Severe difficulties were also experienced socio-economically, at 52% in patients and 49% in caregivers, especially among patients in their fifties (58%) and those with their spouse (65%) as caregivers. The topmost need was the introduction of new technology for treatment of PD (62%), followed by relief of costs for treatment (38%) and a family support system (31%). The majority (91%) of the patients were diagnosed with PD within two years after onset of symptoms.
Conclusion
We know that the difficulties of PD and the needs for government assistance are different between patients and caregivers. These results emphasize that perceiving the difficulties and needs of patients and caregivers early can help to prevent and ameliorate the burden of disease.

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Review Article
MicroRNA Biomarkers in Neurodegenerative Diseases and Emerging NanoSensors Technology
Pratik Shah, Seok Keun Cho, Peter Waaben Thulstrup, Morten Jannik Bjerrum, Phil Hyu Lee, Ju-Hee Kang, Yong-Joo Bhang, Seong Wook Yang
J Mov Disord. 2017;10(1):18-28.   Published online January 18, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.16037
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AbstractAbstract PDF
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are essential small RNA molecules (20–24 nt) that negatively regulate the expression of target genes at the post-transcriptional level. Due to their roles in a variety of biological processes, the aberrant expression profiles of miRNAs have been identified as biomarkers for many diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and neurodegenerative diseases. In order to precisely, rapidly and economically monitor the expression of miRNAs, many cutting-edge nanotechnologies have been developed. One of the nanotechnologies, based on DNA encapsulated silver nanoclusters (DNA/AgNCs), has increasingly been adopted to create nanoscale bio-sensing systems due to its attractive optical properties, such as brightness, tuneable emission wavelengths and photostability. Using the DNA/AgNCs sensor methods, the presence of miRNAs can be detected simply by monitoring the fluorescence alteration of DNA/AgNCs sensors. We introduce these DNA/ AgNCs sensor methods and discuss their possible applications for detecting miRNA biomarkers in neurodegenerative diseases.

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Original Article
Validation of the Korean Version of the Scale for Outcomes in Parkinson’s Disease-Autonomic
Ji-Young Kim, In-Uk Song, Seong-Beom Koh, Tae-Beom Ahn, Sang Jin Kim, Sang-Myung Cheon, Jin Whan Cho, Yun Joong Kim, Hyeo-Il Ma, Mee-Young Park, Jong Sam Baik, Phil Hyu Lee, Sun Ju Chung, Jong-Min Kim, Han-Joon Kim, Young-Hee Sung, Do Young Kwon, Jae-Hyeok Lee, Jee-Young Lee, Ji Sun Kim, Ji Young Yun, Hee Jin Kim, Jin Young Hong, Mi-Jung Kim, Jinyoung Youn, Ji Seon Kim, Eung Seok Oh, Hui-Jun Yang, Won Tae Yoon, Sooyeoun You, Kyum-Yil Kwon, Hyung-Eun Park, Su-Yun Lee, Younsoo Kim, Hee-Tae Kim, Joong-Seok Kim
J Mov Disord. 2017;10(1):29-34.   Published online January 18, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.16057
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Autonomic symptoms are commonly observed in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and often limit the activities of daily living. The Scale for Outcomes in Parkinson’s disease-Autonomic (SCOPA-AUT) was developed to evaluate and quantify autonomic symptoms in PD. The goal of this study was to translate the original SCOPA-AUT, which was written in English, into Korean and to evaluate its reliability and validity for Korean PD patients.
Methods
For the translation, the following processes were performed: forward translation, backward translation, expert review, pretest of the pre-final version and development of the final Korean version of SCOPA-AUT (K-SCOPA-AUT). In total, 127 patients with PD from 31 movement disorder clinics of university-affiliated hospitals in Korea were enrolled in this study. All patients were assessed using the K-SCOPA-AUT and other motor, non-motor, and quality of life scores. Test-retest reliability for the K-SCOPA-AUT was assessed over a time interval of 10−14 days.
Results
The internal consistency and reliability of the K-SCOPA-AUT was 0.727 as measured by the mean Cronbach’s α-coefficient. The test-retest correlation reliability was 0.859 by the Guttman split-half coefficient. The total K-SCOPA-AUT score showed a positive correlation with other non-motor symptoms [the Korean version of non-motor symptom scale (K-NMSS)], activities of daily living (Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale part II) and quality of life [the Korean version of Parkinson’s Disease Quality of Life 39 (K-PDQ39)].
Conclusion
The K-SCOPA-AUT had good reliability and validity for the assessment of autonomic dysfunction in Korean PD patients. Autonomic symptom severities were associated with many other motor and non-motor impairments and influenced quality of life.

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Case Report
Familial Hyperekplexia, a Potential Cause of Cautious Gait: A New Korean Case and a Systematic Review of Phenotypes
Yoonju Lee, Nan Young Kim, Sangkyoon Hong, Su Jin Chung, Seong Ho Jeong, Phil Hyu Lee, Young H. Sohn
J Mov Disord. 2017;10(1):53-58.   Published online December 27, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.16044
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Familial hyperekplexia, also called startle disease, is a rare neurological disorder characterized by excessive startle responses to noise or touch. It can be associated with serious injury from frequent falls, apnea spells, and aspiration pneumonia. Familial hyperekplexia has a heterogeneous genetic background with several identified causative genes; it demonstrates both dominant and recessive inheritance in the α1 subunit of the glycine receptor (GLRA1), the β subunit of the glycine receptor and the presynaptic sodium and chloride-dependent glycine transporter 2 genes. Clonazepam is an effective medical treatment for hyperekplexia. Here, we report genetically confirmed familial hyperekplexia patients presenting early adult cautious gait. Additionally, we review clinical features, mode of inheritance, ethnicity and the types and locations of mutations of previously reported hyperekplexia cases with a GLRA1 gene mutation.

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Original Articles
The MMSE and MoCA for Screening Cognitive Impairment in Less Educated Patients with Parkinson’s Disease
Ji In Kim, Mun Kyung Sunwoo, Young H. Sohn, Phil Hyu Lee, Jin Y. Hong
J Mov Disord. 2016;9(3):152-159.   Published online September 21, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.16020
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
To explore whether the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) can be used to screen for dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in less educated patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD).
Methods
We reviewed the medical records of PD patients who had taken the Korean MMSE (K-MMSE), Korean MoCA (K-MoCA), and comprehensive neuropsychological tests. Predictive values of the K-MMSE and K-MoCA for dementia or MCI were analyzed in groups divided by educational level.
Results
The discriminative powers of the K-MMSE and K-MoCA were excellent [area under the curve (AUC) 0.86–0.97] for detecting dementia but not for detecting MCI (AUC 0.64–0.85). The optimal screening cutoff values of both tests increased with educational level for dementia (K-MMSE < 15 for illiterate, < 20 for 0.5–3 years of education, < 23 for 4–6 years, < 25 for 7–9 years, and < 26 for 10 years or more; K-MoCA < 7 for illiterate, < 13 for 0.5–3 years, < 16 for 4–6 years, < 19 for 7–9 years, < 20 for 10 years or more) and MCI (K-MMSE < 19 for illiterate, < 26 for 0.5–3 years, < 27 for 4–6 years, < 28 for 7–9 years, and < 29 for 10 years or more; K-MoCA < 13 for illiterate, < 21 for 0.5–3 years, < 23 for 4–6 years, < 25 for 7–9 years, < 26 for 10 years or more).
Conclusion
Both MMSE and MoCA can be used to screen for dementia in patients with PD, regardless of educational level; however, neither test is sufficient to discriminate MCI from normal cognition without additional information.

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Jae-Hyeok Lee, Jongkyu Park, Ho-Sung Ryu, Hyeyoung Park, Young Eun Kim, Jin Yong Hong, Sang Ook Nam, Young-Hee Sung, Seung-Hwan Lee, Jee-Young Lee, Myung Jun Lee, Tae-Hyoung Kim, Chul Hyoung Lyoo, Sun Ju Chung, Seong Beom Koh, Phil Hyu Lee, Jin Whan Cho, Mee Young Park, Yun Joong Kim, Young H. Sohn, Beom Seok Jeon, Myung Sik Lee
J Mov Disord. 2016;9(1):20-27.   Published online January 25, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.15058
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) represents a group of inherited movement disorders characterized by iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. Recent advances have included the identification of new causative genes and highlighted the wide phenotypic variation between and within the specific NBIA subtypes. This study aimed to investigate the current status of NBIA in Korea.
Methods
We collected genetically confirmed NBIA patients from twelve nationwide referral hospitals and from a review of the literature. We conducted a study to describe the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of Korean adults with atypical pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN).
Results
Four subtypes of NBIA including PKAN (n = 30), PLA2G6-related neurodegeneration (n = 2), beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration (n = 1), and aceruloplasminemia (n = 1) have been identified in the Korean population. The clinical features of fifteen adults with atypical PKAN included early focal limb dystonia, parkinsonism-predominant feature, oromandibular dystonia, and isolated freezing of gait (FOG). Patients with a higher age of onset tended to present with parkinsonism and FOG. The p.R440P and p.D378G mutations are two major mutations that represent approximately 50% of the mutated alleles. Although there were no specific genotype-phenotype correlations, most patients carrying the p.D378G mutation had a late-onset, atypical form of PKAN.
Conclusions
We found considerable phenotypic heterogeneity in Korean adults with atypical PKAN. The age of onset may influence the presentation of extrapyramidal symptoms.

Citations

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JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders