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JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders

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8 "Ji Young Yun"
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Original Articles
Musculoskeletal Problems Affect the Quality of Life of Patients with Parkinson’s Disease
Young Eun Kim, Han-Joon Kim, Ji Young Yun, Woong-Woo Lee, Hui-Jun Yang, Jong-Min Kim, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2018;11(3):133-138.   Published online September 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18022
  • 5,709 View
  • 130 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Musculoskeletal problems are more common in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) than in normal elderly, but the impact of musculoskeletal problems on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with PD is unknown.
Methods
Four hundred consecutive patients with PD were enrolled for the evaluation of musculoskeletal problems and HRQoL. HRQoL was assessed by the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, which comprised physical health and mental health.
Results
Of the total patients, 265 patients had musculoskeletal problems, and 135 patients did not have musculoskeletal problems. Patients with musculoskeletal problems reported lower levels of HRQoL in terms of physical health than did patients without musculoskeletal problems (p < 0.05). In women, all components of physical health were lower in patients with musculoskeletal problems than in patients without musculoskeletal problems (p < 0.05). Meanwhile, in men, only the bodily pain score of physical health was lower in patients with musculoskeletal problems than in patients without musculoskeletal problems. Mental health and physical health were negatively correlated with depression, Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale I & II scores, and pain severity from musculoskeletal problems, in that order (p < 0.01 for all).
Conclusion
These results suggest that musculoskeletal problems in patients with PD affect HRQoL significantly, mainly in terms of physical health rather than mental health and especially in women rather than men. Musculoskeletal problems should not be overlooked in the care of patients with PD.
Individual Therapeutic Singing Program for Vocal Quality and Depression in Parkinson’s Disease
Eun Young Han, Ji Young Yun, Hyun Ju Chong, Kyoung-Gyu Choi
J Mov Disord. 2018;11(3):121-128.   Published online August 9, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.17078
  • 8,320 View
  • 240 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) frequently experience depression associated with voice problems. Singing involves the use of similar muscles and the neural networks associated with vocal function and emotional response. The purpose of this study is to enhance vocal quality and depressive symptoms of patients with PD using individual singing program.
Methods
The Individual Therapeutic Singing Program for PD (ITSP-PD) was conducted by a certified music therapist. In total, nine PD patients with a subjective voice problem or depression participated in 6 sessions over 2 weeks. We measured the Maximum Phonation Time (MPT) via the Praat test, the Voice Handicap Index (VHI), the Voice-Related Quality of Life (V-RQOL) and the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS).
Results
In total, 8 out of 9 patients completed all the sessions; 6 out of 8 patients participated in the follow-up test after 6 months. A statistically significant change in MPT (p = 0.011) was observed between the pre- and post-tests. The VHI (p = 0.035) and the GDS (p = 0.018) were significantly lower in the post-test. In the pre-, post-, and follow-up tests, the MPT (p = 0.030), V-RQOL (p = 0.008), and GDS (p = 0.009) were significantly changed.
Conclusion
The ITSP-PD based on neurological singing therapy for PD showed therapeutic possibility for vocal function and depression in patients with PD. Our findings suggest the need for a randomized study to examine the continuing positive effects of the ITSP-PD over a longer period of time.
Amantadine and the Risk of Dyskinesia in Patients with Early Parkinson’s Disease: An Open-Label, Pragmatic Trial
Aryun Kim, Young Eun Kim, Ji Young Yun, Han-Joon Kim, Hui-Jun Yang, Woong-Woo Lee, Chae Won Shin, Hyeyoung Park, Yu Jin Jung, Ahro Kim, Yoon Kim, Mihee Jang, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2018;11(2):65-71.   Published online May 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18005
  • 6,810 View
  • 214 Download
  • 12 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
We examined whether amantadine can prevent the development of dyskinesia.
Methods
Patients with drug-naïve Parkinson’s disease (PD), younger than 70 years of age and in the early stage of PD (Hoehn and Yahr scale < 3), were recruited from April 2011 to December 2014. The exclusion criteria included the previous use of antiparkinsonian medication, the presence of dyskinesia, significant psychological disorders, and previous history of a hypersensitivity reaction. Patients were consecutively assigned to one of 3 treatment groups in an open label fashion: Group A-1, amantadine first and then levodopa when needed; Group A-2, amantadine first, dopamine agonist when needed, and then levodopa; and Group B, dopamine agonist first and then levodopa when needed. The primary endpoint was the development of dyskinesia, which was analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier survival rate.
Results
A total of 80 patients were enrolled: Group A-1 (n = 27), Group A-2 (n = 27), and Group B (n = 26). Twenty-four patients were excluded from the analysis due to the following: withdrawal of amantadine or dopamine agonist (n = 9), alternative diagnosis (n = 2), withdrawal of consent (n = 1), and breach in the protocol (n = 12). After exclusion, 5 of the 56 (8.93%) patients developed dyskinesia. Patients in Group A-1 and A-2 tended to develop dyskinesia less often than those in Group B (cumulative survival rates of 0.933, 0.929, and 0.700 for A-1, A-2, and B, respectively; p = 0.453).
Conclusion
Amantadine as an initial treatment may decrease the incidence of dyskinesia in patients with drug-naïve PD.
Validity and Reliability Study of the Korean Tinetti Mobility Test for Parkinson’s Disease
Jinse Park, Seong-Beom Koh, Hee Jin Kim, Eungseok Oh, Joong-Seok Kim, Ji Young Yun, Do-Young Kwon, Younsoo Kim, Ji Seon Kim, Kyum-Yil Kwon, Jeong-Ho Park, Jinyoung Youn, Wooyoung Jang
J Mov Disord. 2018;11(1):24-29.   Published online January 23, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.17058
  • 8,360 View
  • 240 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Postural instability and gait disturbance are the cardinal symptoms associated with falling among patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). The Tinetti mobility test (TMT) is a well-established measurement tool used to predict falls among elderly people. However, the TMT has not been established or widely used among PD patients in Korea. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Korean version of the TMT for PD patients.
Methods
Twenty-four patients diagnosed with PD were enrolled in this study. For the interrater reliability test, thirteen clinicians scored the TMT after watching a video clip. We also used the test-retest method to determine intrarater reliability. For concurrent validation, the unified Parkinson’s disease rating scale, Hoehn and Yahr staging, Berg Balance Scale, Timed-Up and Go test, 10-m walk test, and gait analysis by three-dimensional motion capture were also used. We analyzed receiver operating characteristic curve to predict falling.
Results
The interrater reliability and intrarater reliability of the Korean Tinetti balance scale were 0.97 and 0.98, respectively. The interrater reliability and intra-rater reliability of the Korean Tinetti gait scale were 0.94 and 0.96, respectively. The Korean TMT scores were significantly correlated with the other clinical scales and three-dimensional motion capture. The cutoff values for predicting falling were 14 points (balance subscale) and 10 points (gait subscale).
Conclusion
We found that the Korean version of the TMT showed excellent validity and reliability for gait and balance and had high sensitivity and specificity for predicting falls among patients with PD.
Validation of the Korean Version of the Scale for Outcomes in Parkinson’s Disease-Autonomic
Ji-Young Kim, In-Uk Song, Seong-Beom Koh, Tae-Beom Ahn, Sang Jin Kim, Sang-Myung Cheon, Jin Whan Cho, Yun Joong Kim, Hyeo-Il Ma, Mee-Young Park, Jong Sam Baik, Phil Hyu Lee, Sun Ju Chung, Jong-Min Kim, Han-Joon Kim, Young-Hee Sung, Do Young Kwon, Jae-Hyeok Lee, Jee-Young Lee, Ji Sun Kim, Ji Young Yun, Hee Jin Kim, Jin Young Hong, Mi-Jung Kim, Jinyoung Youn, Ji Seon Kim, Eung Seok Oh, Hui-Jun Yang, Won Tae Yoon, Sooyeoun You, Kyum-Yil Kwon, Hyung-Eun Park, Su-Yun Lee, Younsoo Kim, Hee-Tae Kim, Joong-Seok Kim
J Mov Disord. 2017;10(1):29-34.   Published online January 18, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.16057
  • 12,208 View
  • 322 Download
  • 19 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Autonomic symptoms are commonly observed in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and often limit the activities of daily living. The Scale for Outcomes in Parkinson’s disease-Autonomic (SCOPA-AUT) was developed to evaluate and quantify autonomic symptoms in PD. The goal of this study was to translate the original SCOPA-AUT, which was written in English, into Korean and to evaluate its reliability and validity for Korean PD patients.
Methods
For the translation, the following processes were performed: forward translation, backward translation, expert review, pretest of the pre-final version and development of the final Korean version of SCOPA-AUT (K-SCOPA-AUT). In total, 127 patients with PD from 31 movement disorder clinics of university-affiliated hospitals in Korea were enrolled in this study. All patients were assessed using the K-SCOPA-AUT and other motor, non-motor, and quality of life scores. Test-retest reliability for the K-SCOPA-AUT was assessed over a time interval of 10−14 days.
Results
The internal consistency and reliability of the K-SCOPA-AUT was 0.727 as measured by the mean Cronbach’s α-coefficient. The test-retest correlation reliability was 0.859 by the Guttman split-half coefficient. The total K-SCOPA-AUT score showed a positive correlation with other non-motor symptoms [the Korean version of non-motor symptom scale (K-NMSS)], activities of daily living (Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale part II) and quality of life [the Korean version of Parkinson’s Disease Quality of Life 39 (K-PDQ39)].
Conclusion
The K-SCOPA-AUT had good reliability and validity for the assessment of autonomic dysfunction in Korean PD patients. Autonomic symptom severities were associated with many other motor and non-motor impairments and influenced quality of life.
Case Reports
Amantadine Induced Corneal Edema in a Patient with Primary Progressive Freezing of Gait
Young Eun Kim, Ji Young Yun, Hui-Jun Yang, Han-Joon Kim, Mee Kum Kim, Won Ryang Wee, Beom S. Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2013;6(2):34-36.   Published online October 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.13008
  • 16,554 View
  • 60 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Amantadine is commonly used for Parkinsonism. However amantadine can induce adverse corneal reaction. Here we report a patient with primary progressive freezing of gait who had severe corneal edema associated with amantadine, which was reversible after discontinuation of the amantadine. This report alerts neurologists for this reversible but potentially critical corneal edema in patients with Parkinsonism who are receiving amantadine.

Hypomania Induced by Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation in a Parkinson’s Disease Patient: Does It Suggest a Dysfunction of the Limbic Circuit?
Ji Seon Kim, Hee Jin Kim, Ji-Young Lee, Jong Min Kim, Ji Young Yun, Beom S. Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2012;5(1):14-17.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.12004
  • 11,308 View
  • 62 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

The aim of this report was to describe a case of hypomania after deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) in a Parkinson’s disease (PD) patient. 59-year-old man with a 15-year history of PD underwent bilateral implantation of electrodes to the STN. Immediately after surgery, his motor function was markedly improved and his mood was elevated to hypomania. Fusion images of the preoperative MRI and postoperative CT scan showed that the electrodes were located in the medial portion of the STN. In this case, behavioral mood change was related to the deep brain stimulation. Moreover, the anatomical location and the functional alteration of the STN after the DBS surgery might be related to the regulatory system of the associative and limbic cortico-subcortical circuits.

A Case of Adrenoleukodystrophy Presenting as Progressive Cerebellar Dysfunction
Seunguk Jung, Jong Won Chung, Ji Young Yun, Han-Joon Kim, Beom Seok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2009;2(2):91-94.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.09025
  • 11,730 View
  • 78 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a hereditary neurological disorder affecting the nervous system and adrenal cortex. The phenotype of X-ALD ranges from the rapidly progressive cerebral form to milder adrenomyeloneuropathy. However, cerebellar manifestations are rare. We report a case of adrenoleukodystrophy presenting as progressive cerebellar dysfunction resembling olivopontocerebellar degeneration, with a review of the literature


JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders