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24 "Han-Joon Kim"
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Brief communication
Sensitivity of Detecting Alpha-Synuclein Accumulation in the Gastrointestinal Tract and Tissue Volume Examined
Chaewon Shin, Seong-Ik Kim, Sung-Hye Park, Jung Hwan Shin, Chan Young Lee, Han-Kwang Yang, Hyuk-Joon Lee, Seong-Ho Kong, Yun-Suhk Suh, Han-Joon Kim, Beomseok Jeon
Received March 15, 2022  Accepted May 31, 2022  Published online July 26, 2022  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22042    [Epub ahead of print]
  • 244 View
  • 23 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
This study aimed to evaluate whether a larger tissue volume increases the sensitivity of detecting alpha-synuclein (AS) pathology in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.
Methods
Nine patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) or idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep disorder (iRBD) who underwent GI operation and had full-depth intestinal blocks were included. All patients were selected from our previous study population. A total of 10 slides (5 serial sections from the proximal and distal blocks) per patient were analyzed.
Results
In previous studies, pathologic evaluation revealed phosphorylated AS (+) in 5/9 patients (55.6%) and in 1/5 controls (20.0%); in this extensive examination, this increased to 8/9 patients (88.9%) but remained the same in controls (20.0%). The severity and distribution of positive findings were similar between patients with iRBD and PD.
Conclusion
Examining a large tissue volume increased the sensitivity of detecting AS accumulation in the GI tract.
Original Articles
Long-Term Outcomes of Deep Brain Stimulation in Pantothenate Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration-Related Dystonia
Kyung Ah Woo, Han-Joon Kim, Seung-Ho Jeon, Hye Ran Park, Kye Won Park, Seung Hyun Lee, Sun Ju Chung, Jong-Hee Chae, Sun Ha Paek, Beomseok Jeon
Received January 6, 2022  Accepted March 29, 2022  Published online July 26, 2022  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22002    [Epub ahead of print]
  • 186 View
  • 11 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
To investigate the long-term clinical outcomes of pallidal deep brain stimulation (GPi-DBS) in patients with pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN).
Methods
We reviewed the records of patients with genetically confirmed PKAN who received bilateral GPi-DBS for refractory dystonia and were clinically followed up for at least 2 years postoperatively at two centers in Korea. Pre- and postoperative Burke– Fahn–Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale motor subscale (BFMDRS-M) scores, disability subscale (BFMDRS-D) scores, and qualitative clinical information were prospectively collected. Descriptive analysis was performed for BFMDRS-M scores, BFMDRSD scores, and the orofacial, axial, and limb subscores of the BFMDRS-M at 6–12, 24–36, and 60–72 months postoperatively.
Results
Five classic-type, four atypical-type, and one unknown-type PKAN cases were identified. The mean preoperative BFMDRS-M score was 92.1 for the classic type and 38.5 for the atypical or unknown type, with a mean BFMDRS follow-up of 50.7 months and a clinical follow-up of 69.0 months. The mean improvements in BFMDRS-M score were 11.3%, 41.3%, and 30.5% at 6–12, 24–36, and 60–72 months, respectively. In four patients with full regular evaluations until 60–72 months, improvements in the orofacial, axial, and limb subscores persisted, but the disability scores worsened from 24–36 months post-operation compared to the baseline, mainly owing to the aggravation of eating and feeding disabilities.
Conclusion
The benefits of GPi-DBS on dystonia may persist for more than 5 years in PKAN. The effects on patients’ subjective disability may have a shorter duration despite improvements in dystonia owing to the complex manifestations of PKAN.
Semiautomated Algorithm for the Diagnosis of Multiple System Atrophy With Predominant Parkinsonism
Woong-Woo Lee, Han-Joon Kim, Hong Ji Lee, Han Byul Kim, Kwang Suk Park, Chul-Ho Sohn, Beomseok Jeon
Received December 8, 2021  Accepted March 10, 2022  Published online July 26, 2022  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21178    [Epub ahead of print]
  • 185 View
  • 14 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Putaminal iron deposition is an important feature that helps differentiate multiple system atrophy with predominant parkinsonism (MSA-p) from Parkinson’s disease (PD). Most previous studies used visual inspection or quantitative methods with manual manipulation to perform this differentiation. We investigated the value of a new semiautomated diagnostic algorithm using 3T-MR susceptibility-weighted imaging for MSA-p.
Methods
This study included 26 MSA-p, 68 PD, and 41 normal control (NC) subjects. The algorithm was developed in 2 steps: 1) determine the image containing the remarkable putaminal margin and 2) calculate the phase-shift values, which reflect the iron concentration. The next step was to identify the best differentiating conditions among several combinations. The highest phaseshift value of each subject was used to assess the most effective diagnostic set.
Results
The raw phase-shift values were present along the lateral margin of the putamen in each group. It demonstrates an anterior- to-posterior gradient that was identified most frequently in MSA-p. The average of anterior 5 phase shift values were used for normalization. The highest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.874, 80.8% sensitivity, and 86.7% specificity) of MSA-p versus PD was obtained under the combination of 3 or 4 vertical pixels and one dominant side when the normalization methods were applied. In the subanalysis for the MSA-p patients with a longer disease duration, the performance of the algorithm improved.
Conclusion
This algorithm detected the putaminal lateral margin well, provided insight into the iron distribution of the putaminal rim of MSA-p, and demonstrated good performance in differentiating MSA-p from PD.
Development of Clinical Milestones in Parkinson’s Disease After Bilateral Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation
Jed Noel A. Ong, Jung Hwan Shin, Seungho Jeon, Chan Young Lee, Han-Joon Kim, Sun Ha Paek, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(2):124-131.   Published online May 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21106
  • 614 View
  • 70 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients does not halt disease progression, as these patients will progress and develop disabling non-levodopa responsive symptoms. These features may act as milestones that represent the overall functionality of patients after DBS. The objective of this study was to investigate the development of clinical milestones in advanced PD patients who underwent bilateral STN-DBS.
Methods
The study evaluated PD patients who underwent STN-DBS at baseline up to their last follow-up using the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale and Hoehn and Yahr scale. The symptoms of hallucinations, dysarthria, dysphagia, frequent falls, difficulty walking, cognitive impairment and the loss of autonomy were chosen as the clinical milestones.
Results
A total of 106 patients with a mean age of 47.21 ± 10.52 years at disease onset, a mean age of 58.72 ± 8.74 years at surgery and a mean disease duration of 11.51 ± 4.4 years before surgery were included. Initial improvement of motor symptoms was seen after the surgery with the appearance of clinical milestones over time. Using the moderately disabling criteria, 81 patients (76.41%) developed at least one clinical milestone, while 48 patients (45.28%) developed a milestone when using the severely disabling criteria.
Conclusion
STN-DBS has a limited effect on axial and nonmotor symptoms of the PD patients, in contrast to the effect on motor symptoms. These symptoms may serve as clinical milestones that can convey the status of PD patients and its impact on the patients and their caregivers. Therefore, advanced PD patients, even those treated with bilateral STN-DBS, will still require assistance and cannot live independently in the long run.
Brief communication
Automatic Measurement of Postural Abnormalities With a Pose Estimation Algorithm in Parkinson’s Disease
Jung Hwan Shin, Kyung Ah Woo, Chan Young Lee, Seung Ho Jeon, Han-Joon Kim, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(2):140-145.   Published online January 19, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21129
  • 1,108 View
  • 211 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
This study aims to develop an automated and objective tool to evaluate postural abnormalities in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients.
Methods
We applied a deep learning-based pose-estimation algorithm to lateral photos of prospectively enrolled PD patients (n = 28). We automatically measured the anterior flexion angle (AFA) and dropped head angle (DHA), which were validated with conventional manual labeling methods.
Results
The automatically measured DHA and AFA were in excellent agreement with manual labeling methods (intraclass correlation coefficient > 0.95) with mean bias equal to or less than 3 degrees.
Conclusion
The deep learning-based pose-estimation algorithm objectively measured postural abnormalities in PD patients.
Letter to the editor
A Case of AOA2 With Compound Heterozygous SETX Mutations
Hee Jin Chang, Ryul Kim, Minchae Kim, Jangsup Moon, Man Jin Kim, Han-Joon Kim
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(2):178-180.   Published online December 24, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21139
  • 1,091 View
  • 200 Download
PDF
Brief communication
Investigation of Nocturnal Hypokinesia and Health-Related Quality of Life in Parkinsonian Patients with the Korean Version of the Nocturnal Hypokinesia Questionnaire
Ji-Hyun Choi, Jee-Young Lee, Chaewon Shin, Dallah Yoo, Jin Hee Im, Kyung Ah Woo, Han-Joon Kim, Tae-Beom Ahn, Jong-Min Kim, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2021;14(3):221-225.   Published online May 26, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20172
  • 2,159 View
  • 51 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
To assess nocturnal hypokinesia using the Korean version of the Nocturnal Hypokinesia Questionnaire (NHQ-K) in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients across disease stages.
Methods
We developed the NHQ-K and performed questionnaire-based interviews with 108 PD patients from three referral hospitals. Clinical associations of nocturnal hypokinesia and its impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) were also analyzed.
Results
The NHQ-K showed acceptable internal consistency (0.83) and interrater reliability (0.95). Nocturnal hypokinesia significantly affected HRQoL in PD patients at both the early and advanced stages (adjusted p < 0.001). Increased severity of nocturnal hypokinesia was associated with dyskinesias, off-period disability, apathy, and anxious mood in PD patients (adjusted p < 0.01) after controlling for disease severity and medication dose.
Conclusion
The NHQ-K is useful for screening nocturnal hypokinesia in PD patients. Given the high impact of nocturnal hypokinesia on HRQoL, comprehensive management of nocturnal disability is needed for PD patients.
Case Report
Young-Onset Parkinson’s Disease with Impulse Control Disorder Due to Novel Variants of F-Box Only Protein 7
Dallah Yoo, Ji-Hyun Choi, Jin-Hee Im, Man Jin Kim, Han-Joon Kim, Sung Sup Park, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(3):225-228.   Published online September 9, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20026
  • 3,549 View
  • 98 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
F-box only protein 7 (FBXO7) is a rare monogenic cause of hereditary Parkinson’s disease (PD) with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance and a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations. Here, we report a de novo PD patient with onset at the age of 28 with novel compound heterozygous variants in the FBXO7 gene (c.1162C>T, p.Gln388X; c.80G>A, p.Arg27His). The clinical features of the patient were problematic impulse control disorder behaviors and pyromania, and pyramidal signs were negative. We describe the novel pathogenic variants of the FBXO7 gene with detailed clinical pictures to report the expanding genotypes and phenotypes of FBXO7-associated parkinsonism.
Letter to the editor
A Rare Case of Late Adult-Onset Niemann-Pick Disease Type C
Ryul Kim, Dallah Yoo, Sangmin Park, Jung Hwan Shin, Ji-Hyun Choi, Han-Joon Kim, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(2):163-165.   Published online March 18, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.19077
  • 4,459 View
  • 164 Download
  • 2 Citations
PDFSupplementary Material
Review Article
Immunotherapy Targeting Neurodegenerative Proteinopathies: α-Synucleinopathies and Tauopathies
Junghwan Shin, Han-Joon Kim, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(1):11-19.   Published online December 19, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.19057
  • 6,100 View
  • 380 Download
  • 12 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
α-Synuclein and tau deposition in the central nervous system is responsible for various parkinsonian syndromes, including Parkinson’s disease, multiple system atrophy, dementia with Lewy bodies, progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration. Emerging evidence has suggested that pathologic α-synuclein and tau are transmitted from cell to cell and further accelerate the aggregation of pathologic proteins in neighboring cells. Furthermore, extracellular pathologic proteins have also been reported to provoke inflammatory responses that lead to neurodegeneration. Therefore, immunotherapies targeting extracellular α-synuclein and tau have been proposed as potential disease-modifying strategies. In this review, we summarize completed phase I trials and ongoing phase II trials of immunotherapies against α-synuclein and tau and further discuss concerns and hurdles to overcome in the future.
Letter to the editor
Successful Pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation in a Patient with Childhood-Onset Generalized Dystonia with ANO3 Mutation
Dallah Yoo, Han-Joon Kim, Jong-Hee Chae, Sun Ha Paek, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2019;12(3):190-191.   Published online July 17, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.19016
  • 3,867 View
  • 104 Download
  • 5 Citations
PDFSupplementary Material
Original Article
Nonmotor and Dopamine Transporter Change in REM Sleep Behavior Disorder by Olfactory Impairment
Jee-Young Lee, Eun Jin Yoon, Yu Kyeong Kim, Chae Won Shin, Hyunwoo Nam, Jae Min Jeong, Han-Joon Kim, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2019;12(2):103-112.   Published online May 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18061
  • 4,747 View
  • 179 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
It is unclear whether the decline in dopamine transporters (DAT) differs among idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) patients with different levels of olfactory impairment. This study aimed to characterize DAT changes in relation to nonmotor features in iRBD patients by olfactory loss.
Methods
This prospective cohort study consisted of three age-matched groups: 30 polysomnography-confirmed iRBD patients, 30 drug-naïve Parkinson’s disease patients, and 19 healthy controls without olfactory impairment. The iRBD group was divided into two groups based on olfactory testing results. Participants were evaluated for reported prodromal markers and then underwent 18F-FP-CIT positron emission tomography and 3T MRI. Tracer uptakes were analyzed in the caudate, anterior and posterior putamen, substantia nigra, and raphe nuclei.
Results
Olfactory impairment was defined in 38.5% of iRBD patients. Mild parkinsonian signs and cognitive functions were not different between the two iRBD subgroups; however, additional prodromal features, constipation, and urinary and sexual dysfunctions were found in iRBD patients with olfactory impairment but not in those without. Tracer uptake showed significant group differences in all brain regions, except the raphe nuclei. The iRBD patients with olfactory impairment had uptake reductions in the anterior and posterior putamen, caudate, and substantia nigra (p < 0.016 in all, adjusted for age), which ranged from 0.6 to 0.8 of age-normative values. In contrast, those without olfactory impairment had insignificant changes in all regions ranging above 0.8.
Conclusion
There was a clear distinction in DAT loss and nonmotor profiles by olfactory status in iRBD.
Case Report
A Patient with Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Presenting as Parkinsonism
Ji-Hyun Choi, Jee-Young Lee, Han-Joon Kim, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2018;11(3):145-148.   Published online September 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18028
  • 4,399 View
  • 93 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
The current body of literature contains 5 reports of myotonic dystrophy (DM) with parkinsonism: 4 reports of DM type 2 and 1 report of clinically suspected DM type 1. To date, there have been no genetically proven cases of DM type 1 with parkinsonism. Here, we report the first case of genetically proven DM type 1 and parkinsonism that developed ahead of muscle symptoms with bilateral putaminal, presynaptic dopaminergic deficits on imaging. A 54-year-old female patient presented with bradykinesia, axial and bilateral limb rigidity, stooped posture, and hypomimia, which did not respond to levodopa. At age 56, she developed neck flexion weakness. Examination showed bilateral facial weakness, percussion and grip myotonia, and electromyography confirmed myotonic discharges. A genetic study of DM type 1 showed a DMPK mutation. At age 58, gait freezing, postural instability, and frequent falling developed and did not respond to increasing doses of levodopa. At age 59, the patient died from asphyxia.
Original Articles
Musculoskeletal Problems Affect the Quality of Life of Patients with Parkinson’s Disease
Young Eun Kim, Han-Joon Kim, Ji Young Yun, Woong-Woo Lee, Hui-Jun Yang, Jong-Min Kim, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2018;11(3):133-138.   Published online September 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18022
  • 5,709 View
  • 130 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Musculoskeletal problems are more common in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) than in normal elderly, but the impact of musculoskeletal problems on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with PD is unknown.
Methods
Four hundred consecutive patients with PD were enrolled for the evaluation of musculoskeletal problems and HRQoL. HRQoL was assessed by the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, which comprised physical health and mental health.
Results
Of the total patients, 265 patients had musculoskeletal problems, and 135 patients did not have musculoskeletal problems. Patients with musculoskeletal problems reported lower levels of HRQoL in terms of physical health than did patients without musculoskeletal problems (p < 0.05). In women, all components of physical health were lower in patients with musculoskeletal problems than in patients without musculoskeletal problems (p < 0.05). Meanwhile, in men, only the bodily pain score of physical health was lower in patients with musculoskeletal problems than in patients without musculoskeletal problems. Mental health and physical health were negatively correlated with depression, Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale I & II scores, and pain severity from musculoskeletal problems, in that order (p < 0.01 for all).
Conclusion
These results suggest that musculoskeletal problems in patients with PD affect HRQoL significantly, mainly in terms of physical health rather than mental health and especially in women rather than men. Musculoskeletal problems should not be overlooked in the care of patients with PD.
Amantadine and the Risk of Dyskinesia in Patients with Early Parkinson’s Disease: An Open-Label, Pragmatic Trial
Aryun Kim, Young Eun Kim, Ji Young Yun, Han-Joon Kim, Hui-Jun Yang, Woong-Woo Lee, Chae Won Shin, Hyeyoung Park, Yu Jin Jung, Ahro Kim, Yoon Kim, Mihee Jang, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2018;11(2):65-71.   Published online May 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18005
  • 6,810 View
  • 214 Download
  • 12 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
We examined whether amantadine can prevent the development of dyskinesia.
Methods
Patients with drug-naïve Parkinson’s disease (PD), younger than 70 years of age and in the early stage of PD (Hoehn and Yahr scale < 3), were recruited from April 2011 to December 2014. The exclusion criteria included the previous use of antiparkinsonian medication, the presence of dyskinesia, significant psychological disorders, and previous history of a hypersensitivity reaction. Patients were consecutively assigned to one of 3 treatment groups in an open label fashion: Group A-1, amantadine first and then levodopa when needed; Group A-2, amantadine first, dopamine agonist when needed, and then levodopa; and Group B, dopamine agonist first and then levodopa when needed. The primary endpoint was the development of dyskinesia, which was analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier survival rate.
Results
A total of 80 patients were enrolled: Group A-1 (n = 27), Group A-2 (n = 27), and Group B (n = 26). Twenty-four patients were excluded from the analysis due to the following: withdrawal of amantadine or dopamine agonist (n = 9), alternative diagnosis (n = 2), withdrawal of consent (n = 1), and breach in the protocol (n = 12). After exclusion, 5 of the 56 (8.93%) patients developed dyskinesia. Patients in Group A-1 and A-2 tended to develop dyskinesia less often than those in Group B (cumulative survival rates of 0.933, 0.929, and 0.700 for A-1, A-2, and B, respectively; p = 0.453).
Conclusion
Amantadine as an initial treatment may decrease the incidence of dyskinesia in patients with drug-naïve PD.

JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders