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JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders

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5 "Beom S. Jeon"
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Review Article
Nonmotor Symptoms and Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson’s Disease
Han-Joon Kim, Beom S. Jeon, Sun Ha Paek
J Mov Disord. 2015;8(2):83-91.   Published online May 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.15010
  • 22,084 View
  • 226 Download
  • 38 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) is an established treatment for the motor symptoms in patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD). In addition to improvements in motor symptoms, many studies have reported changes in various nonmotor symptoms (NMSs) after STN DBS in patients with PD. Psychiatric symptoms, including depression, apathy, anxiety, and impulsivity, can worsen or improve depending on the electrical stimulation parameters, the locations of the stimulating contacts within the STN, and changes in medications after surgery. Global cognitive function is not affected by STN DBS, and there is no increase in the incidence of dementia after STN DBS compared to that after medical treatment, although clinically insignificant declines in verbal fluency have been consistently reported. Pain, especially PD-related pain, improves with STN DBS. Evidence regarding the effects of STN DBS on autonomic symptoms and sleep-related problems is limited and remains conflicting. Many symptoms of nonmotor fluctuations, which are occasionally more troublesome than motor fluctuations, improve with STN DBS. Although it is clear that NMSs are not target symptoms for STN DBS, NMSs have a strong influence on the quality of life of patients with PD, and clinicians should thus be aware of these NMSs when deciding whether to perform surgery and should pay attention to changes in these symptoms after STN DBS to ensure the optimal care for patients.
Case Reports
Stiff-Person Syndrome: Case Series
Yu Jin Jung, Han G. Jeong, Ryul Kim, Han-Joon Kim, Beom S. Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2014;7(1):19-21.   Published online April 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.14004
  • 11,892 View
  • 1,360 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Stiff-person syndrome (SPS) is a rare disorder, characterized by progressive fluctuating muscular rigidity and spasms. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibody is primarily involved in the pathogenesis of SPS and SPS is strongly associated with other autoimmune disease. Here we report three cases of patients with classical SPS finally confirmed by high serum level of GAD antibodies. All of our patients respond favorably to gamma amino butyric acid-enhancing drugs and immunotherapies.
Amantadine Induced Corneal Edema in a Patient with Primary Progressive Freezing of Gait
Young Eun Kim, Ji Young Yun, Hui-Jun Yang, Han-Joon Kim, Mee Kum Kim, Won Ryang Wee, Beom S. Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2013;6(2):34-36.   Published online October 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.13008
  • 16,562 View
  • 60 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Amantadine is commonly used for Parkinsonism. However amantadine can induce adverse corneal reaction. Here we report a patient with primary progressive freezing of gait who had severe corneal edema associated with amantadine, which was reversible after discontinuation of the amantadine. This report alerts neurologists for this reversible but potentially critical corneal edema in patients with Parkinsonism who are receiving amantadine.

Hypomania Induced by Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation in a Parkinson’s Disease Patient: Does It Suggest a Dysfunction of the Limbic Circuit?
Ji Seon Kim, Hee Jin Kim, Ji-Young Lee, Jong Min Kim, Ji Young Yun, Beom S. Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2012;5(1):14-17.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.12004
  • 11,316 View
  • 62 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

The aim of this report was to describe a case of hypomania after deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) in a Parkinson’s disease (PD) patient. 59-year-old man with a 15-year history of PD underwent bilateral implantation of electrodes to the STN. Immediately after surgery, his motor function was markedly improved and his mood was elevated to hypomania. Fusion images of the preoperative MRI and postoperative CT scan showed that the electrodes were located in the medial portion of the STN. In this case, behavioral mood change was related to the deep brain stimulation. Moreover, the anatomical location and the functional alteration of the STN after the DBS surgery might be related to the regulatory system of the associative and limbic cortico-subcortical circuits.

Adult Onset Familial Cherry-Red Spot Myoclonus
Chi Kyung Kim, Beom S. Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2009;2(1):50-52.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.09014
  • 17,508 View
  • 53 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF

We report a case of a 36-year-old woman with progressive generalized myoclonus that first became apparent 9 years ago. Her younger brother had similar problems. Examination of her eyes revealed cherry-red spots. Hexosaminidase A, β-galactosidase and neuraminidase activity were normal. Although the laboratory findings were negative, cherry-red spots, progressive myoclonus and autosomal recessive inheritance pattern suggested that she had an unknown type of lysosomal storage disease.


JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders