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JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders

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Original Article
Amantadine and the Risk of Dyskinesia in Patients with Early Parkinson’s Disease: An Open-Label, Pragmatic Trial
Aryun Kim, Young Eun Kim, Ji Young Yun, Han-Joon Kim, Hui-Jun Yang, Woong-Woo Lee, Chae Won Shin, Hyeyoung Park, Yu Jin Jung, Ahro Kim, Yoon Kim, Mihee Jang, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2018;11(2):65-71.   Published online May 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.18005
  • 6,810 View
  • 214 Download
  • 12 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
We examined whether amantadine can prevent the development of dyskinesia.
Methods
Patients with drug-naïve Parkinson’s disease (PD), younger than 70 years of age and in the early stage of PD (Hoehn and Yahr scale < 3), were recruited from April 2011 to December 2014. The exclusion criteria included the previous use of antiparkinsonian medication, the presence of dyskinesia, significant psychological disorders, and previous history of a hypersensitivity reaction. Patients were consecutively assigned to one of 3 treatment groups in an open label fashion: Group A-1, amantadine first and then levodopa when needed; Group A-2, amantadine first, dopamine agonist when needed, and then levodopa; and Group B, dopamine agonist first and then levodopa when needed. The primary endpoint was the development of dyskinesia, which was analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier survival rate.
Results
A total of 80 patients were enrolled: Group A-1 (n = 27), Group A-2 (n = 27), and Group B (n = 26). Twenty-four patients were excluded from the analysis due to the following: withdrawal of amantadine or dopamine agonist (n = 9), alternative diagnosis (n = 2), withdrawal of consent (n = 1), and breach in the protocol (n = 12). After exclusion, 5 of the 56 (8.93%) patients developed dyskinesia. Patients in Group A-1 and A-2 tended to develop dyskinesia less often than those in Group B (cumulative survival rates of 0.933, 0.929, and 0.700 for A-1, A-2, and B, respectively; p = 0.453).
Conclusion
Amantadine as an initial treatment may decrease the incidence of dyskinesia in patients with drug-naïve PD.
Letter to the editor
Myotonia Congenita Can Be Mistaken as Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia
Aryun Kim, Mihee Jang, Han-Joon Kim, Yoon Kim, Dae-Seong Kim, Jin-Hong Shin, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2018;11(1):49-51.   Published online January 23, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.17056
  • 5,716 View
  • 123 Download
  • 4 Citations
PDF
Original Articles
Validation of the Conversion between the Mini-Mental State Examination and Montreal Cognitive assessment in Korean Patients with Parkinson’s Disease
Ryul Kim, Han-Joon Kim, Aryun Kim, Mi-Hee Jang, Hyun Jeong Kim, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2018;11(1):30-34.   Published online January 11, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.17038
  • 6,884 View
  • 231 Download
  • 13 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Two conversion tables between the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) have recently been established for Parkinson’s disease (PD). This study aimed to validate them in Korean patients with PD and to evaluate whether they could be influenced by educational level.
Methods
A total of 391 patients with PD who undertook both the Korean MMSE and the Korean MoCA during the same session were retrospectively assessed. The mean, median, and root mean squared error (RMSE) of the difference between the true and converted MMSE scores and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were calculated according to educational level (6 or fewer years, 7–12 years, or 13 or more years).
Results
Both conversions had a median value of 0, with a small mean and RMSE of differences, and a high correlation between the true and converted MMSE scores. In the classification according to educational level, all groups had roughly similar values of the median, mean, RMSE, and ICC both within and between the conversions.
Conclusion
Our findings suggest that both MMSE-MoCA conversion tables are useful instruments for transforming MoCA scores into converted MMSE scores in Korean patients with PD, regardless of educational level. These will greatly enhance the utility of the existing cognitive data from the Korean PD population in clinical and research settings.
Need for Registration and Reporting of Acupuncture Trials in Parkinson’s Disease in Korea
Timothy E. Lee, Aryun Kim, Mihee Jang, Beomseok Jeon
J Mov Disord. 2017;10(3):130-134.   Published online September 22, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.17047
  • 5,836 View
  • 84 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Many people dealing with Parkinson’s disease (PD) turn to complementary and alternative medicine when searching for a cure or relief from symptoms. Acupuncture is widely used in the Korean PD population to alleviate symptoms and in hopes of curing the illness. However, acupuncture use for PD patients has only recently begun to be studied scientifically and is still considered an unproven treatment for PD. Therefore, there is an urgent need for acupuncture to be studied, validated and used for PD. Thus, our study’s aim is to examine how many acupuncture studies in PD are registered and reported in Korea.
Methods
The registries Clinicaltrials.gov and the Clinical Research Information Service (CRIS) and the search engine PubMed were searched to find relevant human clinical studies involving acupuncture therapy in PD patients. We examined the registration of trials, the posting and publication of results, and whether published articles were registered.
Results
In Clinicaltrials.gov, one completed trial was found with published results. In CRIS, one completed trial was found with published results. A total of 6 publications were found in our study: 2 articles were registered, but only 1 had the registered trial number listed in the article.
Conclusion
Acupuncture is popular among the PD population in Korea regardless of its unproven safety and efficacy. Despite the pressing need for clinical trials, the number of studies listed in the registries was small, and only a few publications were registered. More effort and rigor are needed to validate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for PD.

JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders