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Volume 9(2); May 2016
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Review Articles
Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation for Treatment of Focal Hand Dystonia: Update and Future Direction
Hyun Joo Cho, Mark Hallett
J Mov Disord. 2016;9(2):55-62.   Published online May 25, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.16014
  • 15,132 View
  • 223 Download
  • 19 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Focal hand dystonia (FHD) is characterized by excessive and unwanted muscle activation in both the hand and arm resulting in impaired performance in particular tasks. Understanding the pathophysiology of FHD has progressed significantly for several decades and this has led to consideration of other potential therapies such as non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS). A number of studies have been conducted to develop new therapy for FHD using transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation. In this paper, we review previous studies and describe the potential therapeutic use of NIBS for FHD. We also discuss the future direction of NIBS to treat FHD.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Technical Ability and Performing Scale (TAPS): A newly developed patient-reported functional rating scale for Musician's focal dystonia
    Marina Ramella, Rosa Maria Converti, Giulia Giacobbi, Anna Castagna, Enrico Saibene, Francesca Borgnis, Francesca Baglio
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2022; 99: 79.     CrossRef
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    Genko Oyama, Nobutaka Hattori
    Journal of Neural Transmission.2021; 128(4): 559.     CrossRef
  • Taakspecifieke focale dystonie bij musici
    T. DOOMS
    Tijdschrift voor Geneeskunde.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Laryngeal Dystonia
    Kristina Simonyan, Julie Barkmeier-Kraemer, Andrew Blitzer, Mark Hallett, John F. Houde, Teresa Jacobson Kimberley, Laurie J. Ozelius, Michael J. Pitman, Robert Mark Richardson, Nutan Sharma, Kristine Tanner
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  • Treatment of focal hand dystonia: current status
    Navnika Gupta, Sanjay Pandey
    Neurological Sciences.2021; 42(9): 3561.     CrossRef
  • Alterations of Interhemispheric Functional Connectivity and Degree Centrality in Cervical Dystonia: A Resting-State fMRI Study
    Wenyan Jiang, Yiwu Lei, Jing Wei, Lu Yang, Shubao Wei, Qiong Yin, Shuguang Luo, Wenbin Guo
    Neural Plasticity.2019; 2019: 1.     CrossRef
  • Update on current and emerging therapies for dystonia
    Karlo J Lizarraga, Duha Al-Shorafat, Susan Fox
    Neurodegenerative Disease Management.2019; 9(3): 135.     CrossRef
  • Lasting Effects of Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Writer’s Cramp: A Case Report
    Antonino Naro, Luana Billeri, Simona Portaro, Placido Bramanti, Rocco Salvatore Calabrò
    Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A unifying motor control framework for task-specific dystonia
    Anna Sadnicka, Katja Kornysheva, John C. Rothwell, Mark J. Edwards
    Nature Reviews Neurology.2018; 14(2): 116.     CrossRef
  • Pain in focal dystonias – A focused review to address an important component of the disease
    Micol Avenali, R. De Icco, M. Tinazzi, G. Defazio, L. Tronconi, G. Sandrini, C. Tassorelli
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2018; 54: 17.     CrossRef
  • Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Combined with Action Observation and Electromyographic Biofeedback Training in a Patient with Writer’s Cramp
    Yohei Okada, Chiharu Shibamoto, Yukari Osumi, Chihiro Asano, Riho Takeuchi, Sachio Nabeshima, Shu Morioka, Koji Shomoto
    Journal of Movement Disorders.2018; 11(2): 82.     CrossRef
  • Dystonia
    Bettina Balint, Niccolò E. Mencacci, Enza Maria Valente, Antonio Pisani, John Rothwell, Joseph Jankovic, Marie Vidailhet, Kailash P. Bhatia
    Nature Reviews Disease Primers.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Stereotactic Lesioning of the Thalamic Vo Nucleus for the Treatment of Writer's Cramp (Focal Hand Dystonia)
    Takeshi Shimizu, Tomoyuki Maruo, Shimpei Miura, Haruhiko Kishima, Yukitaka Ushio, Satoshi Goto
    Frontiers in Neurology.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Biased Visuospatial Attention in Cervical Dystonia
    Gaetana Chillemi, Caterina Formica, Adriana Salatino, Alessandro Calamuneri, Paolo Girlanda, Francesca Morgante, Demetrio Milardi, Carmen Terranova, Alberto Cacciola, Angelo Quartarone, Raffaella Ricci
    Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society.2018; 24(1): 22.     CrossRef
  • Evidence-based guidelines on the therapeutic use of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS)
    Jean-Pascal Lefaucheur, Andrea Antal, Samar S. Ayache, David H. Benninger, Jérôme Brunelin, Filippo Cogiamanian, Maria Cotelli, Dirk De Ridder, Roberta Ferrucci, Berthold Langguth, Paola Marangolo, Veit Mylius, Michael A. Nitsche, Frank Padberg, Ulrich Pa
    Clinical Neurophysiology.2017; 128(1): 56.     CrossRef
  • Research Priorities in Limb and Task-Specific Dystonias
    Sarah Pirio Richardson, Eckart Altenmüller, Katharine Alter, Ron L. Alterman, Robert Chen, Steven Frucht, Shinichi Furuya, Joseph Jankovic, H. A. Jinnah, Teresa J. Kimberley, Codrin Lungu, Joel S. Perlmutter, Cecília N. Prudente, Mark Hallett
    Frontiers in Neurology.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation as an Alternative Treatment in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease
    Yeo Jin Kim
    Brain & Neurorehabilitation.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Non‐invasive brain stimulation for dystonia: therapeutic implications
    R. Erro, M. Tinazzi, F. Morgante, K. P. Bhatia
    European Journal of Neurology.2017; 24(10): 1228.     CrossRef
  • Cathodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Improves Focal Hand Dystonia in Musicians: A Two-Case Study
    Sara Marceglia, Simona Mrakic-Sposta, Manuela Fumagalli, Roberta Ferrucci, Francesca Mameli, Maurizio Vergari, Sergio Barbieri, Alberto Priori
    Frontiers in Neuroscience.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
Movement Disorders Following Cerebrovascular Lesions: Etiology, Treatment Options and Prognosis
Do-Young Kwon
J Mov Disord. 2016;9(2):63-70.   Published online May 25, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.16008
  • 19,483 View
  • 606 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Post-stroke movement disorders are uncommon, but comprise an important part of secondary movement disorders. These exert variable and heterogeneous clinical courses according to the stroke lesion and its temporal relationships. Moreover, the predominant stroke symptoms hinder a proper diagnosis in clinical practice. This article describes the etiology, treatment options and prognosis of post-stroke movement disorders.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Adult-onset sporadic chorea: real-world data from a single-centre retrospective study
    Roberta Bovenzi, Matteo Conti, Rocco Cerroni, Mariangela Pierantozzi, Alessandro Stefani, Antonio Pisani, Nicola Biagio Mercuri, Tommaso Schirinzi
    Neurological Sciences.2022; 43(1): 387.     CrossRef
  • Parkinsonism and ataxia
    Giulia Franco, Giulia Lazzeri, Alessio Di Fonzo
    Journal of the Neurological Sciences.2022; 433: 120020.     CrossRef
  • Movement Disorders Associated With Cerebral Artery Stenosis: A Nationwide Study
    Kye Won Park, Nari Choi, Eungseok Oh, Chul Hyoung Lyoo, Min Seok Baek, Han-Joon Kim, Dalla Yoo, Jee-Young Lee, Ji-Hyun Choi, Jae Hyeok Lee, Seong-Beom Koh, Young Hee Sung, Jin Whan Cho, Hui-Jun Yang, Jinse Park, Hae-Won Shin, Tae-Beom Ahn, Ho-Sung Ryu, So
    Frontiers in Neurology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Post-stroke movement disorders disappearance: a report of disappearance of tardive dyskinesia after stroke and a literature review
    Min Seung Kim, InJa Shin, Don Gueu Park, Jung han Yoon
    Acta Neurologica Belgica.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Post-stroke Movement Disorders: Clinical Spectrum, Pathogenesis, and Management
    Priyanka Tater, Sanjay Pandey
    Neurology India.2021; 69(2): 272.     CrossRef
  • Hemibalismo y hemicorea secundarios a un ataque cerebrovascular isquémico insular, una presentación inusual: reporte de caso
    Carlos Martínez-Rubio, Hellen Kreinter-Rosenbaum, Habib Moutran-Barroso
    Neurología Argentina.2020; 12(3): 207.     CrossRef
  • Hemiballismus in subcortical lacunar infarcts
    ChinyeluUchenna Ufoaroh, OvercomerNnaemeka Agah, Nnamdi Morah, ErnestNdukaife Anyabolu
    Nigerian Journal of Medicine.2020; 29(3): 527.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 and stroke: Red flags for secondary movement disorders?
    Daniella Balduino Victorino, Marcia Guimarães-Marques, Mariana Nejm, Fulvio Alexandre Scorza, Carla Alessandra Scorza
    eNeurologicalSci.2020; 21: 100289.     CrossRef
  • Post-stroke restless arm syndrome mimicking hemichorea–hemiballism
    Ha-yom Kim, Moon-Ho Park, Do-Young Kwon
    Acta Neurologica Belgica.2017; 117(3): 791.     CrossRef
  • Vascular Pathology Causing Late Onset Generalized Chorea: A Clinico-Pathological Case Report
    Paula Salgado, Ricardo Taipa, Joana Domingos, Daniel Dias, Manuel Melo Pires, Marina Magalhães
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice.2017; 4(6): 819.     CrossRef
Movement Disorders Following Cerebrovascular Lesion in the Basal Ganglia Circuit
Jinse Park
J Mov Disord. 2016;9(2):71-79.   Published online May 25, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.16005
  • 25,857 View
  • 837 Download
  • 28 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Movement disorders are primarily associated with the basal ganglia and the thalamus; therefore, movement disorders are more frequently manifest after stroke compared with neurological injuries associated with other structures of the brain. Overall clinical features, such as types of movement disorder, the time of onset and prognosis, are similar with movement disorders after stroke in other structures. Dystonia and chorea are commonly occurring post-stroke movement disorders in basal ganglia circuit, and these disorders rarely present with tremor. Rarer movement disorders, including tic, restless leg syndrome, and blepharospasm, can also develop following a stroke. Although the precise mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these conditions have not been fully characterized, disruptions in the crosstalk between the inhibitory and excitatory circuits resulting from vascular insult are proposed to be the underlying cause. The GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid)ergic and dopaminergic systems play key roles in post-stroke movement disorders. This review summarizes movement disorders induced by basal ganglia and thalamic stroke according to the anatomical regions in which they manifest.

Citations

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    Jay Patel, Muhammad Khalil, Sidra Zafar
    Cureus.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Ritwik Ghosh, Souvik Dubey, Shambaditya Das, Julián Benito-León
    The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.2022; 107(3): 557.     CrossRef
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    Satoshi Kimura, Jun Tsugawa, Takafumi Mitsutake, Yuji Tateishi, Hayatsura Hanada, Yusuke Morinaga, Ritsuro Inoue, Yoko Hirata, Yusuke Takemura, Kouhei Nii, Yoshio Tsuboi, Toshio Higashi
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  • Post-stroke Movement Disorders: Clinical Spectrum, Pathogenesis, and Management
    Priyanka Tater, Sanjay Pandey
    Neurology India.2021; 69(2): 272.     CrossRef
  • Diagnostic Challenges in Outpatient Stroke: Stroke Chameleons and Atypical Stroke Syndromes
    Emma JC Wallace, Ava L Liberman
    Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment.2021; Volume 17: 1469.     CrossRef
  • Ischemic stroke-induced polyaxonal innervation at the neuromuscular junction is attenuated by robot-assisted mechanical therapy
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  • Neurovascular Unit as a Source of Ischemic Stroke Biomarkers—Limitations of Experimental Studies and Perspectives for Clinical Application
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  • Vascular Pathology Causing Late Onset Generalized Chorea: A Clinico-Pathological Case Report
    Paula Salgado, Ricardo Taipa, Joana Domingos, Daniel Dias, Manuel Melo Pires, Marina Magalhães
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice.2017; 4(6): 819.     CrossRef
Movement Disorders Following Cerebrovascular Lesions in Cerebellar Circuits
Seong-Min Choi
J Mov Disord. 2016;9(2):80-88.   Published online May 25, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.16004
  • 18,942 View
  • 453 Download
  • 16 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Cerebellar circuitry is important to controlling and modifying motor activity. It conducts the coordination and correction of errors in muscle contractions during active movements. Therefore, cerebrovascular lesions of the cerebellum or its pathways can cause diverse movement disorders, such as action tremor, Holmes’ tremor, palatal tremor, asterixis, and dystonia. The pathophysiology of abnormal movements after stroke remains poorly understood. However, due to the current advances in functional neuroimaging, it has recently been described as changes in functional brain networks. This review describes the clinical features and pathophysiological mechanisms in different types of movement disorders following cerebrovascular lesions in the cerebellar circuits.

Citations

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    Neurological Sciences.2022; 43(12): 6731.     CrossRef
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    Priyanka Tater, Sanjay Pandey
    Neurology India.2021; 69(2): 272.     CrossRef
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Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid β1-42, Tau, and Alpha-Synuclein Predict the Heterogeneous Progression of Cognitive Dysfunction in Parkinson’s Disease
Ju-Hee Kang
J Mov Disord. 2016;9(2):89-96.   Published online May 25, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.16017
  • 18,442 View
  • 231 Download
  • 16 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease with heterogeneous pathological and clinical features. Cognitive dysfunction, a frequent non-motor complication, is a risk factor for poor prognosis and shows inter-individual variation in its progression. Of the clinical studies performed to identify biomarkers of PD progression, the Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) study is the largest study that enrolled drug-naïve and very early stage PD patients. The baseline characteristics of the PPMI cohort were recently published. The diagnostic utility of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, including alpha-synuclein (α-syn), total tau, phosphorylated tau at Thr181, and amyloid β1-42, was not satisfactory. However, the baseline data on CSF biomarkers in the PPMI study suggested that the measurement of the CSF biomarkers enables the prediction of future cognitive decline in PD patients, which was consistent with previous studies. To prove the hypothesis that the interaction between Alzheimer’s pathology and α-syn pathology is important to the progression of cognitive dysfunction in PD, longitudinal observational studies must be followed. In this review, the neuropathological nature of heterogeneous cognitive decline in PD is briefly discussed, followed by a summarized interpretation of baseline CSF biomarkers derived from the data in the PPMI study. The combination of clinical, biochemical, genetic and imaging biomarkers of PD constitutes a feasible strategy to predict the heterogeneous progression of PD.

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Original Articles
Cardiovascular Autonomic Dysfunction in Mild and Advanced Parkinson’s Disease
Joong-Seok Kim, Si-Hoon Lee, Yoon-Sang Oh, Jeong-Wook Park, Jae-Young An, Sung-Kyung Park, Si-Ryung Han, Kwang-Soo Lee
J Mov Disord. 2016;9(2):97-103.   Published online March 28, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.16001
  • 17,310 View
  • 194 Download
  • 25 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
The purpose of the present study was to investigate cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) with mild to severe stages of motor symptoms and to compare cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction between drug-naïve and dopaminergic drug-treated groups.
Methods
This study included 188 PD patients and 25 age-matched healthy controls who underwent head-up tilt-testing, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring and 24-h Holter monitoring. Autonomic function test results were evaluated among groups categorized by motor symptom severities (mild vs. moderate vs. severe) and treatment (drug-naïve or dopaminergic drug treatment).
Results
Orthostatic hypotension and supine hypertension were more frequent in patients with PD than in healthy controls. The frequencies of orthostatic hypotension, supine hypertension, nocturnal hypertension and non-dipping were not different among groups. Additionally, no significant differences were detected in supine BP, orthostatic BP change, nighttime BP, nocturnal BP dipping, or heart rate variabilities among groups.
Conclusions
Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction is not confined to moderate to severe PD patients, and starts early in the course of the disease in a high proportion of PD patients. In addition, dopaminergic drug treatments do not affect cardiovascular autonomic function.

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Movement Disorders in Non-Wilsonian Hepatic Cirrhotic Patients: The Subgroup Analysis of Various Phenotypes and Associated Risk Factors
Kulthida Methawasin, Piyanant Chonmaitree, Chatchawan Wongjitrat, Suthee Rattanamongkolgul, Thanin Asawavichienjinda
J Mov Disord. 2016;9(2):104-113.   Published online March 28, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.15047
  • 17,636 View
  • 82 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
The aim of this subgroup analysis was to identify the risk factors associated with the development of various movement disorder phenotypes.
Methods
Eighty-three non-Wilsonian cirrhotic patients with abnormal movements were allocated into the following groups: intention tremor, bradykinesia, Parkinsonism, and abnormal ocular movements. These movement types were considered the primary outcomes as there was a sufficient sample size. Researchers took into consideration the gender, etiologies of cirrhosis, cirrhosis-related complications, hepatic encephalopathy, medical illness, and some neurological deficits as potential factors associated with these movement disorders.
Results
The male gender (p = 0.002) and alcoholic cirrhosis (p = 0.005) were significant factors for the prevalence of intention tremors. In bradykinesia, hepatic encephalopathy was highly statistically significant (p < 0.001), and females more commonly developed bradykinesia (p = 0.04). The Parkinsonism features in this study were confounded by hyperlipidemia (p = 0.04) and motor or sensory deficits (p = 0.02). Jerky pursuits and a horizontal nystagmus were detected. Jerky pursuits were significantly related to hepatic encephalopathy (p = 0.003) and bradykinesia, but there were no factors associated with the prevalence of nystagmus other than an intention tremor.
Conclusions
The association of alcoholic cirrhosis with the development of intention tremor indicates that the persistent cerebellar malfunction in cirrhotic patients is due to alcohol toxicity. The slowness of finger tapping and jerky pursuit eye movements are significantly associated with hepatic encephalopathy. Thus, further studies are needed to evaluate the diagnostic value of these two signs for an early detection of mild hepatic encephalopathy.
Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder in Parkinson’s Disease: A Preliminary Study
Chang Soo Kim, Young Hee Sung, Min Ju Kang, Kee Hyung Park
J Mov Disord. 2016;9(2):114-119.   Published online March 2, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.15039
  • 14,710 View
  • 137 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is associated with α-synucleinopathies, such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). We aimed to assess the differences in the clinical characteristics of PD with and without RBD.
Methods
Forty-two patients previously diagnosed with PD were evaluated for clinical history, motor and cognitive functioning using the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), autonomic symptoms, sleep characteristics using the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the presence of RBD using the Korean version of the RBD screening questionnaire (RBDSQ). The prevalence of RBD and the patients’ demographic features were evaluated. The patients were classified into two groups, PD with RBD and PD without RBD, based on the RBDSQ scores. The motor and cognitive functions, as well as other clinical features of the two groups were compared.
Results
A total of 42 PD patients were enrolled. Eighteen patients were classified as PD with RBD. Compared to PD without RBD, PD with RBD showed higher scores of rigidity in the UPDRS subscale. Regarding sleep problems, PD with RBD revealed higher sleep disturbance, lower sleep efficiency, and lower overall sleep quality in the PSQI. There was no difference in cognitive dysfunction between the two groups according to the Korean version of the MMSE.
Conclusions
PD with RBD was associated with poorer sleep and motor symptoms. Therefore, RBD symptoms in PD are possibly poor prognostic markers.

Citations

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  • Cerebellar Microstructural Abnormalities in Parkinson’s Disease: a Systematic Review of Diffusion Tensor Imaging Studies
    Maryam Haghshomar, Parnian Shobeiri, Seyed Arsalan Seyedi, Fatemeh Abbasi-Feijani, Amirhossein Poopak, Houman Sotoudeh, Arash Kamali, Mohammad Hadi Aarabi
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Case Report
Woodhouse-Sakati Syndrome: Report of the First Tunisian Family with the C2orf37 Gene Mutation
Olfa Hdiji, Emna Turki, Nouha Bouzidi, Imen Bouchhima, Mariem Damak, Saeed Bohlega, Chokri Mhiri
J Mov Disord. 2016;9(2):120-123.   Published online May 25, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.16003
  • 12,193 View
  • 109 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Woodhouse-Sakati syndrome (WSS) is an infrequent autosomal recessive condition characterized by progressive extrapyramidal signs, mental retardation, hypogonadism, alopecia, and diabetes mellitus. This syndrome belongs to a heterogeneous group of inherited neurodegenerative disorders characterized iron accumulation in the brain, and it is caused by mutations of the C2orf37 gene. We report the first Tunisian family with two affected sisters presenting with a phenotype suggestive of WSS. We examined the index patient presenting with movement disorders and mental retardation and then searched for similar cases in her family, which identified a sister with similar signs. We performed a genetic study that confirmed the diagnosis and revealed a c.436delC mutation of the C2orf37 gene. Therefore, WSS is an important consideration in patients presenting with movement disorders and intellectual disability. A high consanguinity contributes to the clustering of such rare autosomal recessive syndromes.

Citations

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  • Expanding on the phenotypic spectrum of Woodhouse‐Sakati syndrome due to founder pathogenic variant in DCAF17 : Report of 58 additional patients from Qatar and litera
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Letters to the editor
Tremor in a Bassoonist: Tremor in Dystonia or Essential Tremor?
Jung E Park, Vesper Fe Marie L. Ramos, Mark Hallett
J Mov Disord. 2016;9(2):124-125.   Published online March 2, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.15054
  • 10,717 View
  • 56 Download
PDFSupplementary Material
Dropped Head Syndrome after Minor Trauma in a Patient with Levosulpiride-Aggravated Vascular Parkinsonism
Soo Hyun Cho, Dokyung Lee, Tae-Beom Ahn
J Mov Disord. 2016;9(2):126-128.   Published online March 28, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.15052
  • 13,328 View
  • 73 Download
PDFSupplementary Material

JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders