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Roongroj Bhidayasiri 5 Articles
Validation of the Thai Version of the Movement Disorder Society-Sponsored Revision of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale
Priya Jagota, Prachaya Srivanitchapoom, Sitthi Petchrutchatachart, Surat Singmaneesakulchai, Apichart Pisarnpong, Praween Lolekha, Suwanna Setthawatcharawanich, Parnsiri Chairangsaris, Natlada Limotai, Pawut Mekawichai, Pattamon Panyakaew, Onanong Phokaewvarangkul, Jirada Sringean, Yuvadee Pitakpatapee, Nancy LaPelle, Pablo Martinez-Martin, Xuehan Ren, Sheng Luo, Glenn T. Stebbins, Christopher G. Goetz, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(2):151-155.   Published online March 16, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21104
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
This study aims to validate the Thai translation of the Movement Disorder Society-sponsored revision of the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS).
Methods
The English version was translated into Thai and then back-translated into English. The translated version underwent 2 rounds of cognitive pretesting to assess the ease of comprehension, ease of use and comfort with the scale. Then, it underwent large clinimetric testing.
Results
The Thai version was validated in 354 PD patients. The comparative fit index (CFI) for all four parts of the Thai version of the MDS-UPDRS was 0.93 or greater. Exploratory factor analysis identified isolated item differences in factor structure between the Thai and English versions.
Conclusion
The overall factor structure of the Thai version was consistent with that of the English version based on the high CFIs (all CFI ≥ 0.90). Hence, it can be designated the official Thai version of the MDS-UPDRS.
Umami and Other Taste Perceptions in Patients With Parkinson’s Disease
Priya Jagota, Nattida Chotechuang, Chanawat Anan, Teeraparp Kitjawijit, Chanchai Boonla, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(2):115-123.   Published online March 22, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21058
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Studies of taste perceptions in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients have been controversial, and none of these studies have assessed umami taste. This study aimed to assess umami, along with the other 4 taste functions in PD patients.
Methods
Participants were tested for gustation using the modified filter paper disc method and olfaction using the modified Sniffin’ Stick-16 (mSS-16) test (only 14 culturally suitable items were used). A questionnaire evaluated patients’ subjective olfactory and gustatory dysfunction, taste preference, appetite, and food habits.
Results
A total of 105 PD patients and 101 age- and sex-matched controls were included. The body mass index (BMI) of PD patients was lower than that of controls (PD = 22.62, controls = 23.86, p = 0.028). The mSS-16 score was 10.7 for controls and 6.4 for PD patients (p < 0.001) (normal ≥ 9). Taste recognition thresholds (RTs) for sweet, salty, sour, bitter and umami tastes were significantly higher in PD, indicating poorer gustation. All taste RTs correlated with each other, except for umami. Most patients were unaware of their dysfunction. Patients preferred sweet, salty and umami tastes more than the controls. Dysgeusia of different tastes in patients was differentially associated with poorer discrimination of tastes, an inability to identify the dish and adding extra seasoning to food. BMI and mSS-16 scores showed no correlation in either patients or controls.
Conclusion
PD patients have dysgeusia for all five tastes, including umami, which affects their appetite and diet. Patients preferred sweet, salty and umami tastes. This information can help adjust patients’ diets to improve their nutritional status.
Peak-Dose Ballism Associated with Declining Implantable Pulse Generator Battery Life in Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson’s Disease
Denzel Chong Jen-Rei, Lim Thien Thien, Lee Hock Keong, Hoe Wei Leng, Onanong Phokaewvarangkul, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
J Mov Disord. 2021;14(2):166-169.   Published online December 7, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20078
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PDFSupplementary Material
COVID-19: An Early Review of Its Global Impact and Considerations for Parkinson’s Disease Patient Care
Roongroj Bhidayasiri, Sasivimol Virameteekul, Jong-Min Kim, Pramod Kr. Pal, Sun-Ju Chung
J Mov Disord. 2020;13(2):105-114.   Published online April 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20042
  • 11,825 View
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  • 41 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
While many infectious disorders are unknown to most neurologists, COVID-19 is very different. It has impacted neurologists and other health care workers, not only in our professional lives but also through the fear and panic within our own families, colleagues, patients and their families, and even in the wider public. COVID-19 affects all sorts of individuals, but the elderly with underlying chronic conditions are particularly at risk of severe disease, or even death. Parkinson’s disease (PD) shares a common profile as an age-dependent degenerative disorder, frequently associated with comorbidities, particularly cardiovascular diseases, so PD patients will almost certainly fall into the high-risk group. Therefore, the aim of this review is to explore the risk of COVID-19 in PD based on the susceptibility to severe disease, its impact on PD disease severity, potential long-term sequelae, and difficulties of PD management during this outbreak, where neurologists face various challenges on how we can maintain effective care for PD patients without exposing them, or ourselves, to the risk of infection. It is less than six months since the identification of the original COVID-19 case on New Year’s Eve 2019, so it is still too early to fully understand the natural history of COVID-19 and the evidence on COVID-19-related PD is scant. Though the possibilities presented are speculative, they are theory-based, and supported by prior evidence from other neurotrophic viruses closely related to SARS-CoV-2. Neurologists should be on high alert and vigilant for potential acute and chronic complications when encountering PD patients who are suspected of having COVID-19.
Beyond the Classic Segawa Disease, GCH1-Associated Neurodegenerative Parkinsonism: Practical Considerations for Physicians
Jirat Chenbhanich, Jirada Sringean, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
J Mov Disord. 2017;10(2):102-104.   Published online April 18, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.17009
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  • 4 Citations
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JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders