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Priya Jagota 5 Articles
Historical and More Common Nongenetic Movement Disorders From Asia
Norlinah Mohamed Ibrahim, Priya Jagota, Pramod Kumar Pal, Roongroj Bhidayasiri, Shen-Yang Lim, Yoshikazu Ugawa, Zakiyah Aldaajani, Beomseok Jeon, Shinsuke Fujioka, Jee-Young Lee, Prashanth Lingappa Kukkle, Huifang Shang, Onanong Phokaewvarangkul, Cid Diesta, Cholpon Shambetova, Chin-Hsien Lin
J Mov Disord. 2023;16(3):248-260.   Published online June 9, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.22224
  • 1,972 View
  • 123 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Nongenetic movement disorders are common throughout the world. The movement disorders encountered may vary depending on the prevalence of certain disorders across various geographical regions. In this paper, we review historical and more common nongenetic movement disorders in Asia. The underlying causes of these movement disorders are diverse and include, among others, nutritional deficiencies, toxic and metabolic causes, and cultural Latah syndrome, contributed by geographical, economic, and cultural differences across Asia. The industrial revolution in Japan and Korea has led to diseases related to environmental toxin poisoning, such as Minamata disease and β-fluoroethyl acetate-associated cerebellar degeneration, respectively, while religious dietary restriction in the Indian subcontinent has led to infantile tremor syndrome related to vitamin B12 deficiency. In this review, we identify the salient features and key contributing factors in the development of these disorders.

Citations

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  • Diabetic striatopathy and other acute onset de novo movement disorders in hyperglycemia
    Subhankar Chatterjee, Ritwik Ghosh, Payel Biswas, Shambaditya Das, Samya Sengupta, Souvik Dubey, Biman Kanti Ray, Alak Pandit, Julián Benito-León, Rana Bhattacharjee
    Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research & Reviews.2024; 18(3): 102997.     CrossRef
Nine Hereditary Movement Disorders First Described in Asia: Their History and Evolution
Priya Jagota, Yoshikazu Ugawa, Zakiyah Aldaajani, Norlinah Mohamed Ibrahim, Hiroyuki Ishiura, Yoshiko Nomura, Shoji Tsuji, Cid Diesta, Nobutaka Hattori, Osamu Onodera, Saeed Bohlega, Amir Al-Din, Shen-Yang Lim, Jee-Young Lee, Beomseok Jeon, Pramod Kumar Pal, Huifang Shang, Shinsuke Fujioka, Prashanth Lingappa Kukkle, Onanong Phokaewvarangkul, Chin-Hsien Lin, Cholpon Shambetova, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
J Mov Disord. 2023;16(3):231-247.   Published online June 13, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.23065
  • 2,775 View
  • 226 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Clinical case studies and reporting are important to the discovery of new disorders and the advancement of medical sciences. Both clinicians and basic scientists play equally important roles leading to treatment discoveries for both cures and symptoms. In the field of movement disorders, exceptional observation of patients from clinicians is imperative, not just for phenomenology but also for the variable occurrences of these disorders, along with other signs and symptoms, throughout the day and the disease course. The Movement Disorders in Asia Task Force (TF) was formed to help enhance and promote collaboration and research on movement disorders within the region. As a start, the TF has reviewed the original studies of the movement disorders that were preliminarily described in the region. These include nine disorders that were first described in Asia: Segawa disease, PARK-Parkin, X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy, Woodhouse-Sakati syndrome, benign adult familial myoclonic epilepsy, Kufor-Rakeb disease, tremulous dystonia associated with mutation of the calmodulin-binding transcription activator 2 gene, and paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia. We hope that the information provided will honor the original researchers and help us learn and understand how earlier neurologists and basic scientists together discovered new disorders and made advances in the field, which impact us all to this day.
From Evidence to the Dish: A Viewpoint of Implementing a Thai-Style Mediterranean Diet for Parkinson’s Disease
Onanong Phokaewvarangkul, Nitinan Kantachadvanich, Vijittra Buranasrikul, Appasone Phoumindr, Saisamorn Phumphid, Priya Jagota, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
J Mov Disord. 2023;16(3):279-284.   Published online June 19, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.23021
  • 1,541 View
  • 121 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
PDFSupplementary Material

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  • Old problems, new solutions: harnessing technology and innovation in Parkinson’s disease—evidence and experiences from Thailand
    Roongroj Bhidayasiri
    Journal of Neural Transmission.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
Validation of the Thai Version of the Movement Disorder Society-Sponsored Revision of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale
Priya Jagota, Prachaya Srivanitchapoom, Sitthi Petchrutchatachart, Surat Singmaneesakulchai, Apichart Pisarnpong, Praween Lolekha, Suwanna Setthawatcharawanich, Parnsiri Chairangsaris, Natlada Limotai, Pawut Mekawichai, Pattamon Panyakaew, Onanong Phokaewvarangkul, Jirada Sringean, Yuvadee Pitakpatapee, Nancy LaPelle, Pablo Martinez-Martin, Xuehan Ren, Sheng Luo, Glenn T. Stebbins, Christopher G. Goetz, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(2):151-155.   Published online March 16, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21104
  • 3,343 View
  • 157 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective
This study aims to validate the Thai translation of the Movement Disorder Society-sponsored revision of the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS).
Methods
The English version was translated into Thai and then back-translated into English. The translated version underwent 2 rounds of cognitive pretesting to assess the ease of comprehension, ease of use and comfort with the scale. Then, it underwent large clinimetric testing.
Results
The Thai version was validated in 354 PD patients. The comparative fit index (CFI) for all four parts of the Thai version of the MDS-UPDRS was 0.93 or greater. Exploratory factor analysis identified isolated item differences in factor structure between the Thai and English versions.
Conclusion
The overall factor structure of the Thai version was consistent with that of the English version based on the high CFIs (all CFI ≥ 0.90). Hence, it can be designated the official Thai version of the MDS-UPDRS.

Citations

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  • Validation of the Kazakh Version of the Movement Disorder Society-Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale
    Saltanat Abdraimova, Zhanybek Myrzayev, Altynay Karimova, Altynay Talgatkyzy, Talgat Khaibullin, Gulnaz Kaishibayeva, Sandugash Elubaeva, Karlygash Esembekova, Dongrak Choi, Pablo Martinez-Martin, Christopher G. Goetz, Glenn T. Stebbins, Sheng Luo, Chingi
    Clinical Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2024; 10: 100232.     CrossRef
  • Residual effects of combined vibratory and plantar stimulation while seated influences plantar pressure and spatiotemporal gait measures in individuals with Parkinson’s disease exhibiting freezing of gait
    Warongporn Phuenpathom, Pattamon Panyakaew, Peerapon Vateekul, Decho Surangsrirat, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
    Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Global Epidemiology of Movement Disorders: Rare or Underdiagnosed?
    Sarah A. O'Shea, Ludy C. Shih
    Seminars in Neurology.2023; 43(01): 004.     CrossRef
  • Vibratory and plantar pressure stimulation: Steps to improve freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease
    Warongporn Phuenpathom, Pattamon Panyakaew, Peerapon Vateekul, Decho Surangsrirat, Akarin Hiransuthikul, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2022; 105: 43.     CrossRef
Umami and Other Taste Perceptions in Patients With Parkinson’s Disease
Priya Jagota, Nattida Chotechuang, Chanawat Anan, Teeraparp Kitjawijit, Chanchai Boonla, Roongroj Bhidayasiri
J Mov Disord. 2022;15(2):115-123.   Published online March 22, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.21058
  • 4,777 View
  • 226 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
Studies of taste perceptions in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients have been controversial, and none of these studies have assessed umami taste. This study aimed to assess umami, along with the other 4 taste functions in PD patients.
Methods
Participants were tested for gustation using the modified filter paper disc method and olfaction using the modified Sniffin’ Stick-16 (mSS-16) test (only 14 culturally suitable items were used). A questionnaire evaluated patients’ subjective olfactory and gustatory dysfunction, taste preference, appetite, and food habits.
Results
A total of 105 PD patients and 101 age- and sex-matched controls were included. The body mass index (BMI) of PD patients was lower than that of controls (PD = 22.62, controls = 23.86, p = 0.028). The mSS-16 score was 10.7 for controls and 6.4 for PD patients (p < 0.001) (normal ≥ 9). Taste recognition thresholds (RTs) for sweet, salty, sour, bitter and umami tastes were significantly higher in PD, indicating poorer gustation. All taste RTs correlated with each other, except for umami. Most patients were unaware of their dysfunction. Patients preferred sweet, salty and umami tastes more than the controls. Dysgeusia of different tastes in patients was differentially associated with poorer discrimination of tastes, an inability to identify the dish and adding extra seasoning to food. BMI and mSS-16 scores showed no correlation in either patients or controls.
Conclusion
PD patients have dysgeusia for all five tastes, including umami, which affects their appetite and diet. Patients preferred sweet, salty and umami tastes. This information can help adjust patients’ diets to improve their nutritional status.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The missing piece of the puzzle – The key role of the dietitian in the management of Parkinson's disease
    Richelle Flanagan, Carley Rusch, Fiona E. Lithander, Indu Subramanian
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders.2024; 121: 106021.     CrossRef
  • Body mass index in patients with Parkinson’s disease: a systematic review
    Yinghui Li, Yumei Liu, Chuanning Du, Jun Wang
    Journal of Neurophysiology.2024; 131(2): 311.     CrossRef
  • Apnea behavior in early- and late-stage mouse models of Parkinson's disease: Cineradiographic analysis of spontaneous breathing, acute stress, and swallowing
    Lorena Roberta de Souza Mendes Kawamura, Max Sarmet, Priscila Sales de Campos, Sachiko Takehara, Yasuhiro Kumei, Jorge Luis Lopes Zeredo
    Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology.2024; 323: 104239.     CrossRef
  • Gustatory dysfunction is related to Parkinson's disease: A systematic review and meta‐analysis
    Il‐Youp Kwak, Kyung Soo Kim, Hyun Jin Min
    International Forum of Allergy & Rhinology.2023; 13(10): 1949.     CrossRef

JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders