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Peter A. Silburn 1 Article
The Queensland Parkinson’s Project: An Overview of 20 Years of Mortality from Parkinson’s Disease
Peter Cornelis Poortvliet, Alexander Gluch, Peter A. Silburn, George D. Mellick
J Mov Disord. 2021;14(1):34-41.   Published online December 7, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.14802/jmd.20034
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  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective
The consensus is that life expectancy for individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD) is reduced, but estimations vary. We aimed to provide an overview of 20 years of mortality and risk factor data from the Queensland Parkinson’s Project.
Methods
The analysis included 1,334 PD and 1,127 control participants. Preliminary analysis of baseline characteristics (sex, age at onset, family history, smoking status, pesticide exposure, depression and neurosurgery) was conducted, and Kaplan–Meier curves were generated for each potential risk factor. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated comparing this cohort to the general Australian population. Cox proportional hazards regression modeling was used to analyze potential predictors of mortality.
Results
In total, 625 (46.8%) PD and 237 (21.0%) control participants were deceased. Mean disease duration until death was 15.3 ± 7.84 years. Average ages at death were 78.0 ± 7.4 years and 80.4 ± 8.4 years for the deceased PD and control participants, respectively. Mortality was significantly increased for PD in general {SMR = 2.75 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.53–2.96]; p = 0.001}. SMRs were slightly higher for women and those with an age of onset before 60 years. Multivariate analysis showed that deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment was associated with lower mortality [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.76; 95% CI: 0.59–0.98], while occasional pesticide exposure increased mortality risk (HR = 1.48; 95% CI: 1.17–1.88). Family history of PD, smoking and depression were not independent predictors of mortality.
Conclusion
Mortality in PD is increased. Sex, age at onset and occasional pesticide exposure were independent determinants of increased mortality, while DBS treatment was associated with reduced mortality.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
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    BMJ Open.2022; 12(2): e052032.     CrossRef
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  • Worldwide trends in mortality related to Parkinson's disease in the period of 1994–2019: Analysis of vital registration data from the WHO Mortality Database
    Ioannis C. Lampropoulos, Foteini Malli, Olga Sinani, Konstantinos I. Gourgoulianis, Georgia Xiromerisiou
    Frontiers in Neurology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effects of physician visit frequency for Parkinson’s disease treatment on mortality, hospitalization, and costs: a retrospective cohort study
    Takako Fujita, Akira Babazono, Sung-a Kim, Aziz Jamal, Yunfei Li
    BMC Geriatrics.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef

JMD : Journal of Movement Disorders